SMT, PCB Electronics Industry News

SMT, PCB Electronics Industry News

News from Association Connecting Electronics Industries (IPC)

IPC Commends U.S. House of Representatives on Passage of TSCA Modernization Act of 2015 Statement from John Mitchell, IPC President and CEO

Jun 24, 2015

Association Connecting Electronics Industries® and an estimated 800,000 people employed in our 2,200 U.S. member facilities, we commend the U.S. House of Representatives for passing the TSCA Modernization Act of 2015 (H.R. 2576).

IPC supports bipartisan efforts to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976, which needs to be modernized to reflect 21st century realities. A strong, cost-effective, science-based federal chemical regulatory program is important to our members, who use chemicals to manufacture electronics for the nation’s defense, transportation, consumer and other industries. H.R. 2576 includes sensible, balanced provisions for modernizing U.S. chemical safety laws.

IPC appreciates the bipartisan leadership of House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-Mich.) and Ranking Member Frank Pallone (D-N.J.), as well as subcommittee Chairman John Shimkus (R-Ill.) and Ranking Member Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.), and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)

IPC also applauds Reps. Bill Johnson (R-Ohio) and Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.) for their efforts to reform the current TSCA reporting requirements that create an incentive to landfill byproducts rich in valuable minerals, rather than recycle them. Although this problem is not addressed in H.R. 2576, the committee report does include guidance to the US EPA to take appropriate action. IPC will continue working with members of Congress to achieve a balanced resolution of this issue.

IPC ( is a global industry association based in Bannockburn, Ill., dedicated to the competitive excellence and financial success of its 3,600 member companies which represent all facets of the electronics industry, including design, printed board manufacturing, electronics assembly and test. As a member-driven organization and leading source for industry standards, training, market research and public policy advocacy, IPC supports programs to meet the needs of an estimated $2 trillion global electronics industry. IPC maintains additional offices in Taos, N.M.; Washington, D.C.; Stockholm, Sweden; Moscow, Russia; Bangalore and New Delhi, India; Bangkok, Thailand; and Qingdao, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Chengdu, Suzhou and Beijing, China.

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