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Where Is That #2%&*** Reel????

Here's the situation: * Multi-line SMT shop * Reels of fly... - Aug 23, 2004 by davef  

#30175

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 23 August, 2004

Here's the situation: * Multi-line SMT shop * Reels of fly-shit are stocked in a common area for the lines

Here's the question: What do you do when the only reel of part number "A" is running on "Line #1" AND the expediter for "Line #2" has ripped every last strand of hair from her head while trying to find the reel of part number "A" that the computer says is in-house, but she cannot find in either the common or any other stock area?

[We have lots of bald chicks at our plant. See, they're aways pissed, because the can't get dates AND, what makes it worse, they blame us. Well, now that we mention it, some of our bald guys are kinda touchy too. Hmmmm, you s'pose there's something going on there??]

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#30177

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 23 August, 2004

Dave, This problem plagues us as well. We just end up having to physically check all of the line set up sheets.

I am thinking some type of bar code system may be the answer. We are getting ready to implement bartector on our Fuji lines.

This should be an interesting thread.

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Rob

#30185

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 24 August, 2004

How about getting your planning people to run a common parts report on all kits/products prior to manufacturing so you can see any potential conflicts before it hits the fan?

Then when your MRP says you have enough parts, and doesn't tell you the 10K reel is split accross 3 lines you have plently of time to either cut and splice or bring in additional reels.

You can write custom reports for most MRP's, or just export to excel & sort.

Of course, in an ideal world purchasing & materials planning people would recognise that they are there to support manufacturing.....

Any how, I'm sure someone will be along in a moment to sell you a solution.

Cheers,

Rob.

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Dreamsniper

#30196

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 24 August, 2004

I agree with Rob's Common Parts Report and purchasing should be aware that with common parts a single reel parts will not work. They need to stock more supply or if this part is a common part and of low quantity (say 2 per PCB for 6 different products) parts must be manually split into few number of reels. So Manufacturing or Process engineers need to be aware too about the situation.

regards,

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V

#30197

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 24 August, 2004

I feel your pain as well. Our purchasing group minimizes the amount of material in inventory so of course they bring in only what is absolutely needed. When they see 10,000 components in house they just don't understand that the part may be used on 3 different lines. Inventory accuracy helps but the down and dirty way is to create an excel spreadsheet of all common parts and where they are used. That way if you know you have the parts in house at least you'll know where to look for them.

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CT

#30199

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 24 August, 2004

Our ERP shows when a reel has been allocated to whatever line - done at the kitting stage. It was a long tortuous process, but bar code labeling got us there. Scan out to a job, work order, etc., scan back in when it has been torn down.

Not saying we don't have the same issue with having a single reel - but at least we know where it's at. Splice is a four letter word in my dictionary, but we still do it.

I guess it doesn't surprise me that the Manufacturing Engineer has to be called upon to solve supply chain issues, and it's even more comforting to know that things are not all that different from place to place...

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Cal

#30202

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 24 August, 2004

Hey Dave I deal with this every day. UGH!!!! We created a Bin location for each of our pick-and-place machines. Once the parts are moved from stock the computer will be updated as SMT 01xxx, SMT 02, and SMT 03 Bin location for that part. SMT01-03 are the machine numbers and the XXX is the work order number. This works well..but 90% OF our facility is a repair of Telecom equipment and They are always cutting the tapes leaving no leader.

Cal

www.headshaver.org

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KEN

#30214

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 24 August, 2004

Here's one for ya'

Purchasing buys SMT RJ45 connector parts on gray market in reels....reels that are 36 inch diameter!

The pendilum swings the other way...

Purchasing needs 10,000 resistors. They buy 20 (500 count) reels!

I don't know about the reel splitting process. I worked at a company that had a bar-code label process for splitting / combining reels. Some genius spliced a 0603 cap tape to a sot23 tape....absolutely fabulous.

Is there a smt purchasing 101 video anywhere?

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#30222

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 25 August, 2004

I have to chime in here. When I read some of these posts its seems as though alot of people are dealing with outdated equipment (or at least equipment that was not designed for today's manufacturing environment).

Gone are the days that you could have 10 of those reels on the floor. Lower inventories and frequent changeover is your new way of life and you best make some adjustments. Forgive the upcoming plug but it is pertinent, and after all that's what this forum is about;finding solutions to everyday problems.

The Contact Systems C5 series placement machines have built in inventory control software that you can use to determine where that @#$%!& reel is at any given moment. You will know on what feeder/in what slot/of which machine not only that reel is but all reels that have the same part number. You will also know how many parts are on each reel. You can use it to manage all of your inventory, the WIP inventory, or the point of use (fly stuff) inventory. For more information: http://www.contactsystems.com

p.s. our customer base has no trouble getting dates;)

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Rob

#30223

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 25 August, 2004

Wow, you really can do great things with Meccano. Thats it, I'm throwing away all 8 of my ultra fast bomb proof Fujis and swapping them for a brand new Fisher-Price "My First SMT Machine".

Cheers Greg, I've now seen the light!

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#30227

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 25 August, 2004

Not all manufacturers are as big and prominent as you must be. The C5 (22,000 cph/192 feeders)is the right tool for the job for many small to mid size CMs and OEMs who also read these threads and addresses the orignal posters' problem. Fuji makes good machines, they are not designed for fast changeover, small lot sizes, etc. My post was to the point of the original problem. Your post adds nothing to the conversation.

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#30228

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 25 August, 2004

I like that feature, good thinking, but can your machine print barcode labels as well? If you tear down a job and set up a new one, you could attach these labels to each reel and tag the remaining quantity of components, before they go back to the stock room. This way, partial empty reels can be traced and not just full ones. Else, how would you know the quantity of components on a partial empty reel?

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#30229

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 25 August, 2004

Stefan, The scenario you describe is the way it is done on our 3 series placement machines. The C5 series is a databased arrangement. Each reel (tube and tray) that comes in the door gets a unique ID (and a barcode label). This is done with the C5 inventory software and a barcode printer. These reels are automatically added to the database. The machine updates the database when it takes a part from a reel (real time inventory, no pun intended). There are no new labels needed when a job is torn down as the updated information about the reels is in the database. You can see everything you need to know about any part number such as total quantity, how many reels do you have of that part number, where the reels are, and even how many parts are on each reel. Component traceability comes along with this (from which reel did a particular circuit reference get placed). Of course, you could buy a Fuji and merge 2 or 3 third party softwares and hardwares to try and achieve the same result. Thanks for asking, Greg

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smokejumper

#30235

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 25 August, 2004

Dave, you�re probably looking for a bar-code tracking system. Mydata actually has this function built into their software. You can search by part number and it will tell you even across multiple machine if your share info.

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Rob

#30246

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 26 August, 2004

OK Greg, I'm sorry, I'll go & stand in the naughty corner.

On a serious note, can elements of your machine database be outputted in a format that can be loaded (or backflushed)into an MRP, ERP or stock program (.TXT file or something)so that you can update your stock levels after mfg automatically (inc. attrition)as this would save a lot of time and hassle, especially for the smaller guys.

You could then also merge it into a label printing program without much hassle, generating new labels for each reel.

Cheers,

Rob.

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#30249

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 26 August, 2004

Yes, Rob, the database can be output to a text file. But you do not need to create new labels because the correct information is in the database. The original label on the reel contains the reel's unique ID which correlates to the database (the information about the quantity on the reel is in the database, not on a label). When the machine has a mispick or vision error, those parts are deducted from the reel quantity as well thus keeping a more accurate inventory count. When loading the feeders, typically no parts are lost due to the tether on the take up reel that requires only a few millimeters of cover tape leader. Even without a cover tape leader only a couple of components (8mm) will be lost. These lost components can be manually adjusted but this is not necessary because the system is self correcting. That is, when a reel empties, it is deleted from the database. If some components were lost during load and unload cycles they are considered no longer available when the reel is deleted. Thanks for asking-- Greg

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justathought

#30295

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 30 August, 2004

All of these options are great for the C5 but.... are there any service issues we should know about? Like can you service them? Greg you said the C5 is rated at 22,000 CPH is this true of the single head design or just the unfinished dual head design that your website shows a composite drawing of?

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#30302

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 31 August, 2004

The 22,000 cph is for the dual beam machine (C5d), which is in production now alongside our single beam machine. They are built on the same frame and share many assemblies. In fact we only show rendered images of both machines. This is to show the newer cover style which you can see at the ATExpo show in Chicago (September 28-30). Our service department is currently up to speed on the new platform and we are adding field service personnel at this time. We have just added a former speedline tech and are still searching. I hope to have some new pictures on the website and even a video clip within the next few days. Keep checking http://www.contactsystems.com for updated information.

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JB

#30616

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 20 September, 2004

Greg, You are a great salesman. To bad your company can not produce this machine. Contact began with the c7, Decided it cost to much to produce and went with the c5 theroy. Your company has less then two software guys that have a clue. I understand one of the best has left with the rest. Your company has one assembler (Steve) and that is only when he is not being the field service guy. Contact is a company with great theory but no way to produce. The 1st c5 was in production over a year ago and you have produced 2 at best. This is not a machine that has been proven. Anyone can sit around a table and discuss all the wonderful things a customer would want. It takes a company that has resourses and personel to produce it. Contact is not one of those companies. Greg wake up. You need to produce more the 1 proto type machine a year to be a contender in this market.

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#30650

Where Is That #2%&*** Reel???? | 22 September, 2004

JB, First of all thank you for the "great salesman" compliment. And thank you for bringing up this wonderful thread because the more people that read it the better. I don't mean to make you look foolish (or maybe I do) but perhaps you should take a look at our website (www.contactsystems.com). On the home page there is a link to some C5 production pictures. You will see our C5 production line with 8 machines currently in process. The machine in the foreground shows the new cover scheme I talked about earlier. The fourth machine is the first of our dual beam models. Unfortunately Steve was not available at the time the pictures were taken.

For a closer look at the machine please visit our booth at the ATE show in Chicago next week.

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