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Use of acetone (67-64-1) in removing flux

JD

#29170

Use of acetone (67-64-1) in removing flux | 18 June, 2004

Just curious if anyone has had any problems because of using acetone to clean flux off boards or parts. Is acetone an acceptable flux remover for re-work? What are the pros and cons about using acetone

Thanks in advance, JD

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Cal

#29171

Use of acetone (67-64-1) in removing flux | 18 June, 2004

we noticed Electroytic caps (Rubber plug), standoffs, and most of the plastic and rubber parts were effected and started to break down.

I do not know id the mask material is effected or what residue is left behind ....as we never made it past the 1st phase

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JD

#29174

Use of acetone (67-64-1) in removing flux | 18 June, 2004

Out of curiosity, what method did you use? I ask because I have used acetone on a Q-Tip to clean up boards after rework for some time and haven't noticed anything like that. Did you notice it right away? Or after some time went by?

I may need to re-consider how I've been doing things.

Thanks JD

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#29220

Use of acetone (67-64-1) in removing flux | 23 June, 2004

Acetone is likely not compatible with several component types, the evaporation charactoristics are desirable.

IPA is more compatible, though, may not solubilize the residues.

Austin American Technology developed MegaSolv JB and MegaSolv NOC for these reasons. MegaSolv is compatible, evaporates readily, solubilizes flux residues. Today, MegaSolv is available from Petroferm http://www.petroferm.com

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#29241

Use of acetone (67-64-1) in removing flux | 24 June, 2004

Echoing SheanDalton's comments [above in this thread]: * A good way to strip part markings, solder mask, etc. * A fairly aggressive against most polymers. * A flammable material. * VOC issues in its use. * Assembly workers don't like the smell. * A good solvent that evaporates quickly. But if you're trying to clean the boards, you will just dissolve any acetone-soluble contaminates and the evaporating solvent will deposit them elsewhere on the assemblies.

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