Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


To overcome human problem

tommy

#26689

To overcome human problem | 20 December, 2003

My boss who always like to read smt related mag,pick up what he can or don't understand from the article and blame all quality issue on engineering. We are seeing solder paste residue all over Juki printer equipment,on the floor,etc.This is mainly due to machine keeper don't follow work manual to carry out daily task.Daily quality issue and customer return has become norm to us.My boss would prefer us to reply customer by putting all failure on process rather then human ignorance. What can we do to prevent human error and ensure machine keeper comply with the working procedures.We don't have money to automate each process. Any suggestion are welcome.

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#26690

To overcome human problem | 20 December, 2003

Hello, You may not like my idea but here goes. Take the operators in a room and tell them to look at each other. Then tell them that If the solder paste isn't put where it belongs and not placed where it dosen't belong, that some of you won't be in this room next week. And we will continue to replace you people till the problem is resolved. There is a lot of qualified operators out of work and they also realize that solder paste is expensive. If the boss dosen't believe that this will work, I would look for a new boss. This solution would also work for software engineers at some of the machine manufactures. thanks for your time.

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Dean

#26693

To overcome human problem | 20 December, 2003

Hi Tommy.

A clean printer has always been a hot button with me as-well. Solder paste is like a can of paint. As soon as you open it up you will get it on all the things you wanted to preserve as clean.

The cleanliness and condition of your stencil printer is a direct reflection of your entire manufacturing model. Example: Dusty printer hoods, solder paste on floor, conveyor belts, solder on the inside or the "skins" dust bunnies under machine etc. tells me my product may not receive the best process and attention it deserves. On the other-hand a sterile printner, clean floors, no dust on equipment (or under) is a direct indicator of process and quality.

PROOF: as design features decrease, the average factory contamination must reduce accordingly to maintain the same solder joint contamination level.

Plus it's a safety hazzard! (assuming your not lead-free)

Here is what you need: 1. Clear expectation of what is required. You should not have hard-fast consequences if you don't have a clear expectation. Who, What, When, Where, How. Document your needs as a work instruction. Pictures of Acceptable vs. Not acceptable conditons of cleanliness would be helpful.

2. Engineering must train the leads, supervisors, managers and operators. You need buy-in at every level. You need everyone's support as Engineering can not support this alone (been there- done that!) 3. Local champions (leads / supervisors) must audit your process for compliance. Engineerings responsibility has ended in the definition of the process. Manufacturing must be allowed to take over and engage the process.

Expect grumblings in the begining. It will not be easy. Change is never easy. The entire process described helps install a sense of discipline.

Good luck.

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Primus

#26696

To overcome human problem | 22 December, 2003

Hi,I am a Mfg. Engineering Tech. and do Maintenance on all of our Equipment. 4796 HSPs, Dek 265 LT screen printers, GSMs, ect. We have 6 lines of equipment with certain operators assigned to each line, and you can really tell which operators do or don't do daily maintenance, or proper clean up. It all boils down to training, and which operators care. Seems like the ones who don't care are the ones who cry the loudest when raises don't come due to lack of profit. I love working on and repairing this equipment, but it really upsets me when I must do it due to someone else not caring about it. Good operators is where it all starts. I know it is frustrating, first hand. Start to document problem areas, operators and report it to management once a month. This way You are covered #1,and #2 it may start the purging process of some less than par operators. Nice to see I am not the only one with this problem.

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tommy

#26697

To overcome human problem | 22 December, 2003

Many thanks to all of you for contributing your valuable ideas and sharing your thoughts. Once again thanks.

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Dean

#26707

To overcome human problem | 22 December, 2003

Digital camera's are worth their weight in gold!

Foremost it's a health and safety issue. That alone should compel the management team to get with the program.

As an Engineer I have to know how to operate, program, maintain, troubleshoot and CLEAN every piece of equipment we have. If I am asked to help on a printer and I see solder on everything but the stencil, I have the Manager, supervisor, line lead and the operator know that the reason the line is down is because I will not work in/on an unsafe environment. And you know that with that kind of pressure...the leads and operator are going to fix the situation ASAP.

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ex maintain leader

#26713

To overcome human problem | 23 December, 2003

I'm agree with suggestion "ceaning importance"

you schould make your leader job in three group of maintenace the equipment

1st daily maintenance line operator is responsieble to lean the machine on the surface where is not need any tools required operation. Each shift, minimum end of the shift, controller .. lineleader/supervisor.

2nd weekly maintenance maintenance technician should be chequed the operators aktivity and do the maintenance, he schould have a chek list wich at first schould be signitured and directl reporting to you, random checking needed by you

3rd engineering maintenance plan and mountly checking the machines if it is too many then the worstes and the best

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