Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


low volume /semi-automatic solutions

Jipp

#24860

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 17 June, 2003

We designed small PCBs (typically 2"x5")for our some of our products for quite some time now. We did not use PCB extensively and just hand-produced everything but...

We now use them more and more and they got more sophisticated. we're heading for 200units/month. I want to keep a low level of rejects and increase productivity.

I only started looking at semi-automatic Pick&Place and I do not really know the process.

Can anyone shed some light with some interesting info or W3 links? Is it reasonable to go for semi-automatic production? Who are the big companies and the stay-away-from companies.

Thank you guys.

reply »

#24861

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 17 June, 2003

Jipp, we sell used equipment for PCBA. I could most likely steer you in the right direction if I knew a little bit more about your product. Feel free to e-mail sales@equipmentresource.com or give me a call at 303-287-9333.

Ken Fry Equipment Resource

reply »


RDR

#24863

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 17 June, 2003

First, what would you define as semi-automatic?

For SMT production you might need a screen printer (these can be anything from full manual to full auto. The low end printers manual require each board to be aligned with a piece of mylar prior to printing on the board - Two prints per board - 1 for aligning and 1 for actual paste deposit on the board.

A pretty good way to go would be to get what some call a semi-auto printer this requires the use of mylar but only for the first print and the the fiducials are recognized (after teaching) by a camera or two. (A Speedprint 200 is a good example of this)

Or you can buy a stencil and place the board on a table line up the board to the stencil and manually squeegee the paste onto the board with a putty knife.

As far as placement goes you need to define what type of components you are currently using and it would be a good idea to peek ahead and see what packages are coming down the pipe. Depending on the answer to this you will determine if you need vision or mechanical placement, A multipurpose placement unit (handles most all package technologies) or one that just places caps/resistors and smaller 50 mil pitch stuff.

How fast do you need them to be built? This will determine on the speed you need from your placement machine.

There a million (give or take) different placement machines out there with minor and major differences relating to a million (give or take) different parameters. To get an idea of some of the lower end semi-auto stuff take a look at this site http://www.manncorp.com. I am not recommending or promoting this company they just have a pretty good site that will show you a bunch of stuff that I believe is in your scope.

I need to stop, or I will go on and on and on.

Hope this helps a little. Russ

reply »

#24864

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 17 June, 2003

Hello Jipp.

Before I recomend something, can you send to me a picture of the PCB (Bare board) and one picture with the PCB with components, I could help you.

samaniegocesar@smtnet.com, samaniegocesar@hotmail.com

Regards...

reply »

#24865

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 18 June, 2003

Hi Jipp, If we are talking about 200-500 boards per month the main question is"Is it reasonable to go for semi-automatic production?". You will nead at least 1.Manual stencil printer 2.P&P machine 3.Infrared dryer or reflow oven

Most expensive part is P&P machine. You could bye used, but that means problems. If your boards are 200-400/month why don't you produce them outside your company?

reply »


CAL

#24868

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 18 June, 2003

There are a few directions to go from Here... 1) Outsource it to a CM, 2) Capital investment both have there issues. To Out source I would have processes in place to Inspect quality, resolve issues, Assure quaility, and Hope they can meet your deadlines (200 Boards sometimes do not take high priority).What I am saying is you need to be a careful watch dog.

2) To go the Capital investment you are looking at $30-50K investment. Buy New as you do not want the head aches of used stuff (at least not at this stage). Remember there are Things you need to keep in mind when going this route You will have extra costs..i.e. Stencil costs, stencil wipes, Paste costs, Nozzles, feeders, installation costs so keep in mind that once you go this way you will always have cost. I like going this way as you can monitor quality better and react faster to issues.

In addition you may want to take some basic SMT manufacturing courses.

OEMs: www.manncorp.com www.apsgold.com www.fritschusa.com www.essemtec.com www.dimasmt.com I would test drive each one for software, ease of use, craftsmanship. (I Do know with some of these manufacturers that if you down the road want to go full automatic the program does not differ from machines)

Training: www.ACIUSA.org www.Solderingtech.com www.smtplus.com

Good luck Cal

reply »

mkehoe

#24873

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 18 June, 2003

Orrrrr, just buy a small reflow oven, 5K to 7K, and eliminate the paste printing by using solid solder deposition. No shorts, no opens, no cleaning, and no voids.

www.sipad.com

If you decide to print your own paste later you can invest the extra 30-90K for a printer and go from there.

Hand placing of components down to .4mm and 0201 as well as BGA and LLP is being done every day with this process.

mk

This message was posted Add this forum to your site! Click to learn more. the Electronics Forum @

reply »


RDR

#24874

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 18 June, 2003

Not that it is important, but Manncorp is not an O.E.M. They buy equipment and put there name on it. Sometimes this can lead to service issues (sometimes they need to call the OEM to resolve issues which can lead to delays). I am not saying that these types of companies have inferior service, just something to be aware of.

Russ

reply »


CAL

#24884

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 19 June, 2003

Russ- You are correct!! Manncorp is not an OEM, but they do have exclusive North American rights to certain Product lines. OEP is better named Original Equipment Provider.

I do disagree with you though on the service issue. Siemens Has a problem they can not fix and they call Germany. Assembleon has an issue they can not fix they call the Netherlands. Fuji has a problem they can not fix they call Japan. Manncorp has a problem they call the OEM. Regardless of who it is factory training is factory training.

Now if you want to go the route of Spare Parts...then this is where the OEP falls a little short.

:-) Cal

reply »


RDR

#24891

low volume /semi-automatic solutions | 19 June, 2003

Cal, I Agree

Russ

reply »

SMT Replacement Nozzles

PCB Routers