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SMT package types


RDR

#22170

SMT package types | 29 October, 2002

Does anybody know of any document(s) that define the different package types such as SOP, SOIC, VSOP, TSOP,TSSOP, QSOP, LQFP, VQFP, etc...? I am re-doing our component library and would like to use industry names for each component type.

Thanks

Russ

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Daan

#22171

SMT package types | 29 October, 2002

Very helpfull are the downloadable catalogues of dummy component suppliers, like Topline (http://www.toplinedummy.com)and Practicalcomponents (http://www.practicalcomponents.com).

Daan Terstegge www.smtinfo.net

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Tony

#22174

SMT package types | 29 October, 2002

Those are a great help for component ID as far as looking at the part and finding the correct name but is there a list of what all those letters mean? It would help me to remember if I could relate it to a real discription.

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genny

#22175

SMT package types | 29 October, 2002

SOP small outline package SOIC small outline integrated circuit TSOP thin SOP TSSOP thin shrink SOP PQFP plastic quad flat pack (also CQFP is ceramic QFP) LQFP low profile QFP VQFP I don't know QSOP a guess is 'quad small outline pkg'

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#22176

SMT package types | 29 October, 2002

IPC-SM-782 defines some of the acronyms.

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#22177

SMT package types | 29 October, 2002

SOP small outline package, SOIC small outline integrated circuit, VSOP very small outline package, TSOP thin small outline package,TSSOP thin shrink small outline package, QSOP ???, LQFP low profile quad flat pack, VQFP ???

The packages come and go and there is no standard naming convention. Some givens are O = outline, S = small (or when used with another S means small shrink), T = thin, P = package (pack), V = very, F = flat, L = typically means low (as in low profile).

A useful reference might be IPC-SM-782 surface mount design and land pattern standard. For the newer packages, the Practical dummy components catalog (as mentioned) is usually more up to date.

Have you ever considered making your identifiers more generic? For example, drop the L, T, B and M off of the QFP designators and just handle the rest with the part number and description.

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RDR

#22178

SMT package types | 29 October, 2002

Thanks for the info, I have previously not used the Ps and Qs so to speak and I am finding now that we are running into trouble mostly due to component height and body sizes. So for example we currently have "16 pin SOP" what we need is "16 pin SOP, 16 pin TSSOP, 16 pin SOIC, 16 pin QSOP," each one of these packages requires different library data since none of them are the same size or height. I have a copy of IPC 782 but it is pretty bare regarding all of the packages. I will get ahold of the dummy component catalogs and that should help a lot.

Russ

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#22190

SMT package types | 30 October, 2002

How about your designator actually contains size info in a code. For example, SO14-237-050-090. That is "package type" - "width" (over leads) - "lead pitch" - "thickness". The problem with this is a great deal of thought has to be put in before committing. If you look at the Practical components part numbering system it is along the same concept. (maybe the Practical numbers are the answer)

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Stephen

#22191

SMT package types | 30 October, 2002

One thing to take note of with the TSOP's is that is a T1 variety and a T2 variety. One has the leads on the sides, the other has leads on the ends. I believe the T1 has the leads on the ends, but I would have to look it up to be sure.

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