Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


Soldering BGA

Chris C

#20469

Soldering BGA | 24 June, 2002

Do I really need a Vapour Phase Oven or a Nitrogen Oven when soldering PBGA's if my PCB has only 2 to 3 BGA's (ball pitch of 0.5mm to 1.27mm) ? Is the quality of soldering when using an 8-Zone Convective Oven is not acceptable? I have been bombarded by equipment suppliers that my company needs vapour phase or nitrogen oven to solder those bga's on my products and that my 8 zone oven is not reliable enough to do the job. I want to stick with my ovens since the above 2 types of ovens are really expensive. Please help !

thanks

reply »


RDR

#20471

Soldering BGA | 24 June, 2002

I sure hope you don't need any of those!! otherwise I don't know what I or probably most of the people reading this forum have been doing for the last 5 years. We are using a 4 zone oven (wish I had an 8 zone) and have great success putting these down. by the way who is telling you this nonsense?

Russ

reply »

#20472

Soldering BGA | 24 June, 2002

Russ is correct.

The sales-types telling you these stories are not acting reputably. You should not allow them in your plant. If you do not control the sales-types that gain entry to your plant, ask that person to come on-line here and we will explain to that person why they should exclude these suppliers and how they should go about complaining the management of the equipment suppler.

What equipment companies do these sales-types [that are telling you that you need to buy their equipment because your 8-zone oven is inadequate] represent?

reply »

ianchan

#20474

Soldering BGA | 25 June, 2002

Hi mate,

"inadequate/not reliable" is a performance basis lingo term used for machines that are not treated like the precious things they are. treat em well and they will work reliable enough for you. ill-treat and scrimp on the PM(maintenance) and sooner or later they will rebel and foul you up.

4 zones, 6 zones, 8 zones, 12 zones, all can reflow SMD type of components. the only difference relative to oven length is the longer the oven (more zones) the easier for process control to achieve that reflow profile the customer and QA love. The shorter the oven, the more sweat and blood required to get the same reflow profile (or nearest to that lovable profile). Your process engineer should be able to advise you on how he sets the zone temperatures to get a correlation to the reflow profile graph-plot out. try to adjust conveyor belt speed first, only then play with the zone temperature settings if you need to finetune the reflow profile.

By chance, those sales types distint relatives of someone important in your plant(factory)? try running a check on their backgrounds and put up notices at key entry points as follows:

"Engineer escort required beyond this point, by order of management".

reply »

ianchan

#20475

Soldering BGA | 25 June, 2002

Vapour Phase is a "phased out" technology.

Hot Air Convection is the commonly acceptable type of Reflow Oven. Some folks are getting good improvements for "IR + Hot Air Convection" (combined) Oven technology.

Nitrogen Ovens have their own set of process parameters to consider. This translates to their own problems. Unless you have luxury of time and resources to experiment, leave such ovens for the "bigger boys" until it becomes as wide spread as Hot Air Convection Oven technology.

Kindly note I advocate advancement and learning of new stuff, just that some persons' careers/bosses do not support such learning environments. many persons' are expected to start contributing immediately within the first week on the job.

Hope you don't fall into this category, much... Cheers!

reply »

Daan Terstegge

#20476

Soldering BGA | 25 June, 2002

Because BGA's are so hard to rework, you'll want the maximum process window for your reflow equipment, and this includes an inert atmosphere. But as long as solderability and temperature profile are well controlled you can have perfect results with any ordinary full convection oven. Just make sure that the BGA sees similar temperatures as the rest of the board.

Daan Terstegge http://www.smtinfo.net

This message was posted Add this forum to your site! Click to learn more. the Electronics Forum @

reply »

#20477

Soldering BGA | 25 June, 2002

Ianchan: Watch yourself. Old style vapor phase oven are being replaced by ovens build to capitalize on new generation fluids [ie, Ausimont, F2, etc]. These machines could fill roles in soldering of no-leads.

reply »

ianchan

#20495

Soldering BGA | 26 June, 2002

Hi Dave F,

I'd hold you to that "could" opinion of yours... and I'd be most willing to give the new VP ovens a try if such ovens become commerically acceptable to the pocket and match up to our current process control requirements (that we can achieve using our Hot Air Convection Ovens) call for.

thanks for the gentle warning, I'd make sure to watch my back too *grinz*

reply »

PCB Soldering Tools

ii-feed SMD Intelligent Feeder