Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


MI Solder temp & RF routing

PhingMae

#15939

MI Solder temp & RF routing | 10 May, 1998

Hello. 1 Could anyone tell me the range of temperature to solder MI components? The process eng is using 400~500 degrees Celcius!! For standard 0805/0603 chips & TH components & also to touch up on ICs. What is the consequence? 2.I am currently routing a pcb for RF circuits. Any thing I should keep in mind? 3. Is there any newsletter on SMT related where I can subscribe. Preferbably free.

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Chris Fontaine

#15942

Re: MI Solder temp & RF routing | 11 May, 1998

| Hello. | 1 Could anyone tell me the range of temperature | to solder MI components? The process eng is using 400~500 | degrees Celcius!! For standard 0805/0603 chips & TH components & | also to touch up on ICs. What is the consequence? | 2.I am currently routing a pcb for RF circuits. Any | thing I should keep in mind? | 3. Is there any newsletter on SMT related where I can subscribe. | Preferbably free. Is 400 to 500 C the soldering iron tip temperature or the solder temperature? This range of temperatures sounds more like a soldering iron tip temperature range to me, and may be acceptable for this application. If your solder is running at 400 - 500 C any number of negative things can happen. At these temps board delamination can be expected, as well as an enormous ammount of intermetalic growth (which decreases solder joint strength).

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Herb Pabes

#15944

Re: MI Solder temp & RF routing | 13 May, 1998

| | Hello. | | 1 Could anyone tell me the range of temperature | | to solder MI components? The process eng is using 400~500 | | degrees Celcius!! For standard 0805/0603 chips & TH components & | | also to touch up on ICs. What is the consequence? | | 2.I am currently routing a pcb for RF circuits. Any | | thing I should keep in mind? | | 3. Is there any newsletter on SMT related where I can subscribe. | | Preferbably free. | Is 400 to 500 C the soldering iron tip temperature | or the solder temperature? This range of temperatures | sounds more like a soldering iron tip temperature | range to me, and may be acceptable for this application. | If your solder is running at 400 - 500 C any number | of negative things can happen. At these temps | board delamination can be expected, as well as an | enormous ammount of intermetalic growth (which | decreases solder joint strength).

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Herb Pabes

#15943

Re: MI Solder temp & RF routing | 13 May, 1998

Wave solder temperatures are normally 485 deg. FARENHEIT... not Celcius.. Perhaps you got your units wrong?

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D.Lange

#15940

Re: MI Solder temp & RF routing | 14 May, 1998

| Hello. | 1 Could anyone tell me the range of temperature | to solder MI components? The process eng is using 400~500 | degrees Celcius!! For standard 0805/0603 chips & TH components & | also to touch up on ICs. What is the consequence? | 2.I am currently routing a pcb for RF circuits. Any | thing I should keep in mind? | 3. Is there any newsletter on SMT related where I can subscribe. | Preferbably free. You most definately got your units mixed up! At 400-500 degrees C (752,932 degrees F respectively) you would have done more than delaminate a PCB. Your control module is more than likely set at reflow for 400-500 degrees F and the actual temperature of the assembly would depend on belt speed, air flow, thermal absorption properties of the assembly and many other factors. I solder with setpoint (reflow) at 500 F but assembly only reaches 210-220 for approximately 30-45 seconds. You must have a thermocouple or profiler if you plan to continue soldering. Also keep in mind I am only talking about a single zone in your oven! There are likely more zones that must be adjusted to achieve the proper curve (preheat,soak,reflow and cooldown). Ask you solder manufacturer to provide you with the recommended profile for the alloy you are using. Make your oven fit this profile. If the profile is not right for your part then you are using the wrong paste.

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Earl Moon

#15941

Re: MI Solder temp & RF routing | 15 May, 1998

| | Hello. | | 1 Could anyone tell me the range of temperature | | to solder MI components? The process eng is using 400~500 | | degrees Celcius!! For standard 0805/0603 chips & TH components & | | also to touch up on ICs. What is the consequence? | | 2.I am currently routing a pcb for RF circuits. Any | | thing I should keep in mind? | | 3. Is there any newsletter on SMT related where I can subscribe. | | Preferbably free. | You most definately got your units mixed up! At 400-500 degrees C (752,932 degrees F respectively) you would have done more than delaminate a PCB. Your control module is more than likely set at reflow for 400-500 degrees F and the actual temperature of the assembly would depend on belt speed, air flow, thermal absorption properties of the assembly and many other factors. I solder with setpoint (reflow) at 500 F but assembly only reaches 210-220 for approximately 30-45 seconds. You must have a thermocouple or profiler if you plan to continue soldering. Also keep in mind I am only talking about a single zone in your oven! There are likely more zones that must be adjusted to achieve the proper curve (preheat,soak,reflow and cooldown). Ask you solder manufacturer to provide you with the recommended profile for the alloy you are using. Make your oven fit this profile. If the profile is not right for your part then you are using the wrong paste. For R/F designs many still are not using appropriate design rules for manufacturing - especiall concerning solderability. DFM must be considered first or excessive touch up, repair, and failure will be effected. Use standard, for the most part, design rules for chip device types as neck downs or? Be sure the R/F magicians are included in the design process so they adequately recalculate what neck downs, as an example, to to high speeds, impedance, and the like. Earl Moon

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