Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


Component Baking

Mike Glenn

#15804

Component Baking | 21 May, 1998

Does anyone know about low pressure/low temperature ovens used for baking of moisture senstive components? Thanks

reply »

Earl Moon

#15806

Re: Component Baking | 21 May, 1998

| Does anyone know about low pressure/low temperature | ovens used for baking of moisture senstive | components? | Thanks I need to know from where your need came. I usually just bake in conventional ovens with specified times and temperatures. Please let me know what are your needs. Are they unique - or? Ignorant but wishing to be helpful and to learn, Earl Moon

reply »

Mike Glenn

#15807

Re: Component Baking | 22 May, 1998

| | Does anyone know about low pressure/low temperature | | ovens used for baking of moisture senstive | | components? | | Thanks | I need to know from where your need came. I usually just bake in conventional ovens with specified times and temperatures. Please let me know what are your needs. Are they unique - or? | Ignorant but wishing to be helpful and to learn, | Earl Moon We have many mositure sensitive parts that on tape and reel that cannot be exposed normal air for an extended amount of time Our production runs are usually high mix-low volume. This means we often have left over parts after the exposure time has expired. Unfortunatly we cannot use a conventional oven because our reels cannot withstand high temps. I'd like to use a vacuum oven system since the moisture in the part will evaporate at a lower temperature. This would allow us to bake without having to buy expensive bakeable reels.

Mike Glenn

reply »

Earl Moon

#15809

Re: Component Baking | 22 May, 1998

| | | Does anyone know about low pressure/low temperature | | | ovens used for baking of moisture senstive | | | components? | | | Thanks | | I need to know from where your need came. I usually just bake in conventional ovens with specified times and temperatures. Please let me know what are your needs. Are they unique - or? | | Ignorant but wishing to be helpful and to learn, | | | Earl Moon | We have many mositure sensitive parts that on tape and reel that cannot | be exposed normal air for an extended amount of time | Our production runs are usually high mix-low | volume. This means we often have left over parts | after the exposure time has expired. | Unfortunatly we cannot use a conventional oven | because our reels cannot withstand high temps. | I'd like to use a vacuum oven system since the | moisture in the part will evaporate at a lower | temperature. This would allow us to bake without | having to buy expensive bakeable reels. | | Mike Glenn

Mike, Thank you. As a process and quality person, I often tend to think as a component supplier producing batches of qualified components not needing additional attention as moisture. Again thanks, Earl Moon

reply »

Justin Medernach

#15805

Re: Component Baking | 22 May, 1998

| Does anyone know about low pressure/low temperature | ovens used for baking of moisture senstive | components? | Thanks Mike, Check out the people at 3M. They have come out with high temp reels and carriers that can withstand a bake. Try the guys at Grieve, Blue M, and Despatch as well. They might have some ideas. Regards, Justin

reply »

Steve Gregory

#15808

Re: Component Baking | 22 May, 1998

Hi ya' Mike! For low temperature baking, IPC-SM-786A (Procedures for Characterizing and Handling of Moisture/Reflow Sensitive IC's) specifies a low temperature bake that can be done in the component shipping packaging...ya' wanna remove the bubble-wrap and styrofoam peanuts though. You start out at 40 degrees C, in a oven that has it's humidity controlled at less that 5% relative humidity for 192 hours. Depending on how big the part is, and how much moisture it's absorbed, it could go longer than that...the 192 hours is just a starting point. Be aware that the top film peel-back force on your reeled components is going to increase. Practically every reeled component nowadays uses a thermal adhesive on the top film, and it gets stronger with a 8-day bake at 40 C. Don't go above 45 degrees C in the oven, the adhesive will begin to go bad above that temperature. Actually, if you have the time, and your pick and place machines aren't bothered by the increased peel back force, this is probably the better bake than the one at 125 degrees C. You don't have to worry about ruining the solderabilty at such a low temperature. After the bake you treat these parts the same way you would parts that had the higher temperature bake, as far as the time of exposure to the environment before soldering. I hope this helps ya' out... -Steve Gregory-

reply »

Stu Leech

#15810

Re: Component Baking | 19 October, 1999

I answered another post regarding the subject of demoisturizing bake-out. Our new process works for taped and reeled devices as well as those in trays.

Stu Leech

reply »

Plasma Prior to Conformal Coating

FPC* - Fluid Pressure Control - Dispensing Pump