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SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


Environmental Issues

Dave F

#15789

Environmental Issues | 21 May, 1998

Y'all: IPC set-up a site addressing the environmental issues of the printed circuit fabrication industry. Some of it is interesting and applicable to the assembly business as well, even though not aimed directly at assemblers. IPC has recently told me that they plan to broaden the focus of the site to directly apply the assemblers. Stay tuned. Dave http://www.pwbrc.org/

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Bill Schreiber

#15794

Re: Environmental Issues | 21 May, 1998

| Y'all: IPC set-up a site addressing the environmental issues of the printed circuit fabrication industry. Some of it is interesting and applicable to the assembly business as well, even though not aimed directly at assemblers. IPC has recently told me that they plan to broaden the focus of the site to directly apply the assemblers. Stay tuned. Dave | http://www.pwbrc.org/ The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is attempting to change their image within industry from the "guys in the black hats" to the "good guys." The EPA has a pilot program called "The Environmental Technology Verification Program" (ETV). The ETV will not only certify that a technology in environmentally safe, it will also verify that the technology performs to industry standards. Now, when an EPA inspector tells you that your process is environmentally unacceptable, he will not just leave and let you hanging. He will be able to recommend an alternative process that is 1) certified environmentally safe, 2)proven effective for a given application and 3) cost effective (well, within reason anyway). Smart Sonic Corporation of Newbury Park, CA has been selected by the EPA to participate in the ETV Program. Smart Sonic provides a complete process for cleaning solder paste, SMD adhesives and flux residue from stencils, misprinted PCBs and pallets used in surface mount assembly. The process is non-hazardous and replaces solvents such as CFCs, alcohol, and terpenes with an aqueous detergent that cleans all types of solder paste at ambient temperature. The EPA and Air Quality Management Districts have eliminated CFCs and are now coming down hard on VOCs such as alcohol, terpenes, etc. that contribute to smog and pose a flammable/explosion hazard to the workspace. Expect to see more programs like the ETV in the near future. A similar proactive program is put on by California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) called the "Clean Air Solvent" (CAS) Program. The chemistry used in the Smart Sonic Stencil Cleaning Process, 440-R SMT Detergent, has already been certified by the Air Quality Management District as a "Clean Air Solvent." The term "solvent" is used loosely to include any cleaning chemistry - aqueous or not. The CAS Program started in California in 1997 and is slated to begin in other states soon. As Dave says, "stay tuned!" For more information about the ETV and/or CAS Programs, go to the following URL: http://www.smartsonic.com/news.cfm

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Earl Moon

#15791

Re: Environmental Issues | 21 May, 1998

| Y'all: IPC set-up a site addressing the environmental issues of the printed circuit fabrication industry. Some of it is interesting and applicable to the assembly business as well, even though not aimed directly at assemblers. IPC has recently told me that they plan to broaden the focus of the site to directly apply the assemblers. Stay tuned. Dave | http://www.pwbrc.org/ Not bad as ISO 14000 seeks to take over the world with its advanced European "marketing" efforts - even though 9000 has done much good. Maybe anything is better, or might improve, than the way big brother is handling things with their "massive cleanup" efforts having gone on for all these years with mixed results. Of course, ISO has had its problems, but it still remains up to us to get the job done. However, the printed circuit and semiconductor guys still have much to do. Assemblers probably are the cleanest of the lot. Earl Moon

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Earl Moon

#15795

Re: Environmental Issues | 21 May, 1998

| | Y'all: IPC set-up a site addressing the environmental issues of the printed circuit fabrication industry. Some of it is interesting and applicable to the assembly business as well, even though not aimed directly at assemblers. IPC has recently told me that they plan to broaden the focus of the site to directly apply the assemblers. Stay tuned. Dave | | http://www.pwbrc.org/ | The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is attempting to change their image within industry from the "guys in the black hats" to the "good guys." The EPA has a pilot program called "The Environmental Technology Verification Program" (ETV). The ETV will not only certify that a technology in environmentally safe, it will also | verify that the technology performs to industry standards. Now, when an EPA inspector tells you that your process is environmentally unacceptable, he will not just leave and let you hanging. He will be able to recommend an alternative process that is 1) certified environmentally safe, 2)proven effective for a given application and 3) cost effective (well, within reason anyway). | Smart Sonic Corporation of Newbury Park, CA has been selected by the EPA to participate in the ETV Program. | Smart Sonic provides a complete process for cleaning solder paste, SMD adhesives and flux residue from stencils, misprinted PCBs and pallets used in surface mount assembly. The process is non-hazardous and replaces solvents such as CFCs, alcohol, and terpenes with an aqueous detergent that cleans all types of solder paste at ambient temperature. | The EPA and Air Quality Management Districts have eliminated CFCs and are now coming down hard on VOCs such as alcohol, terpenes, etc. that contribute to smog and pose a flammable/explosion hazard to the workspace. Expect to see more programs like the ETV in the near future. | A similar proactive program is put on by California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) called the "Clean Air Solvent" (CAS) Program. The chemistry used in the Smart Sonic Stencil Cleaning Process, 440-R SMT Detergent, has already been certified by the Air Quality Management District as a "Clean Air Solvent." The term "solvent" is used loosely to include any cleaning chemistry - aqueous or not. The CAS Program started in California in 1997 and is slated to begin in other states soon. As Dave says, "stay tuned!" | For more information about the ETV and/or CAS Programs, go to the following URL: | http://www.smartsonic.com/news.cfm Bill, Most of us have evolved watching all these wonderful changes. Most of them (concerning CFC's and the like) are great. I still wonder where ETV, AQMD, and the rest are going and what role, if any, ISO 14000 (do we need another one of these) plays in our futures. I mean, if we are so environmentally conscious and strictly regulated by mandate in this country, do we need another ISO to get us off the dime? Earl Moon

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Steve Gregory

#15792

Re: Environmental Issues | 21 May, 1998

I hear ya' Earl! I don't know why there seems to be such a push for us to eliminate lead...you're right, assemblers are pretty clean when it comes to lead....actually, the whole industry is, when compared to other industries and the amounts of lead they use...batteries for instance. When was the last time you've heard of lead poisoning of ANYONE? I think the last one I heard of was dealing with children eating lead based paint chips on the east coast in some old apartment building that had paint from WWII in it...again, nothing even remotely to do with electronics. The one other story I can remember that had anything to do with lead was about forcing duck hunters to use steel shot when hunting in the duck clubs down in Los Banos (which is south of San Jose). I worry even more when the government reacts from some lobby group or other organization without really researching things first. A perfect example is California's new, cleaner, safer, reformulated gas that we pay through the nose for out here. Guess what? That gas has now contaminated ground water, lakes, you name it, with MTBE's (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether) a known cancer causing agent...they even have gone so far as to recommend pregnate women out here not to drink the water...and we want them to dictate to us about our use of lead? I just don't know... -Steve Gregory-

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Bill Schreiber

#15796

Re: Environmental Issues | 22 May, 1998

| | | Y'all: IPC set-up a site addressing the environmental issues of the printed circuit fabrication industry. Some of it is interesting and applicable to the assembly business as well, even though not aimed directly at assemblers. IPC has recently told me that they plan to broaden the focus of the site to directly apply the assemblers. Stay tuned. Dave | | | http://www.pwbrc.org/ | | The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is attempting to change their image within industry from the "guys in the black hats" to the "good guys." The EPA has a pilot program called "The Environmental Technology Verification Program" (ETV). The ETV will not only certify that a technology in environmentally safe, it will also | | verify that the technology performs to industry standards. Now, when an EPA inspector tells you that your process is environmentally unacceptable, he will not just leave and let you hanging. He will be able to recommend an alternative process that is 1) certified environmentally safe, 2)proven effective for a given application and 3) cost effective (well, within reason anyway). | | Smart Sonic Corporation of Newbury Park, CA has been selected by the EPA to participate in the ETV Program. | | Smart Sonic provides a complete process for cleaning solder paste, SMD adhesives and flux residue from stencils, misprinted PCBs and pallets used in surface mount assembly. The process is non-hazardous and replaces solvents such as CFCs, alcohol, and terpenes with an aqueous detergent that cleans all types of solder paste at ambient temperature. | | The EPA and Air Quality Management Districts have eliminated CFCs and are now coming down hard on VOCs such as alcohol, terpenes, etc. that contribute to smog and pose a flammable/explosion hazard to the workspace. Expect to see more programs like the ETV in the near future. | | A similar proactive program is put on by California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) called the "Clean Air Solvent" (CAS) Program. The chemistry used in the Smart Sonic Stencil Cleaning Process, 440-R SMT Detergent, has already been certified by the Air Quality Management District as a "Clean Air Solvent." The term "solvent" is used loosely to include any cleaning chemistry - aqueous or not. The CAS Program started in California in 1997 and is slated to begin in other states soon. As Dave says, "stay tuned!" | | For more information about the ETV and/or CAS Programs, go to the following URL: | | http://www.smartsonic.com/news.cfm | Bill, | Most of us have evolved watching all these wonderful changes. Most of them (concerning CFC's | and the like) are great. I still wonder where ETV, AQMD, and the rest are going and what role, if any, ISO 14000 (do we need another one of these) plays in our futures. I mean, if we are | so environmentally conscious and strictly regulated by mandate in this country, do we need | another ISO to get us off the dime? | Earl Moon Earl, The EPA and AQMD have been around a lot longer than ISO. I don't see the EPA program (ETV) or the AQMD program (CAS) as another ISO. I think these regulatory agencies are trying to prevent another mass exodus of companies out of such states as California because of strict environmental regulations. We all know "Big Brother" is going to regulate the environment. The ETV and CAS Programs are just an attempt to take some of the sting out of it. Best regards, Bill

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Earl Moon

#15793

Re: Environmental Issues | 22 May, 1998

| I hear ya' Earl! I don't know why there seems to be such a push for us to eliminate lead...you're right, assemblers are pretty clean when it comes to lead....actually, the whole industry is, when compared to other industries and the amounts of lead they use...batteries for instance. | When was the last time you've heard of lead poisoning of ANYONE? I think the last one I heard of was dealing with children eating lead based paint chips on the east coast in some old apartment building that had paint from WWII in it...again, nothing even remotely to do with electronics. The one other story I can remember that had anything to do with lead was about forcing duck hunters to use steel shot when hunting in the duck clubs down in Los Banos (which is south of San Jose). | I worry even more when the government reacts from some lobby group or other organization without really researching things first. | A perfect example is California's new, cleaner, safer, reformulated gas that we pay through the nose for out here. Guess what? That gas has now contaminated ground water, lakes, you name it, with MTBE's (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether) a known cancer causing agent...they even have gone so far as to recommend pregnate women out here not to drink the water...and we want them to dictate to us about our use of lead? | I just don't know... | -Steve Gregory- Steve baby, And how 'bout those prices at 30 cents/gal. higher than the rest of the state or more compared with the world. It's almost, no it's as if we are constantly being used as laboratory rats - almost like the Microsoft playground in which we all must learn to eat sand along with breatning and drinking what? Windows 95/98 forever. Suck rocks. Christ, I do get carried away - and nowhere left to go? Did receive a consulting offer in Calgary. I hear you just eat dust there. Earl Moon

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Earl Moon

#15797

Re: Environmental Issues | 22 May, 1998

| | | | Y'all: IPC set-up a site addressing the environmental issues of the printed circuit fabrication industry. Some of it is interesting and applicable to the assembly business as well, even though not aimed directly at assemblers. IPC has recently told me that they plan to broaden the focus of the site to directly apply the assemblers. Stay tuned. Dave | | | | http://www.pwbrc.org/ | | | The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is attempting to change their image within industry from the "guys in the black hats" to the "good guys." The EPA has a pilot program called "The Environmental Technology Verification Program" (ETV). The ETV will not only certify that a technology in environmentally safe, it will also | | | verify that the technology performs to industry standards. Now, when an EPA inspector tells you that your process is environmentally unacceptable, he will not just leave and let you hanging. He will be able to recommend an alternative process that is 1) certified environmentally safe, 2)proven effective for a given application and 3) cost effective (well, within reason anyway). | | | Smart Sonic Corporation of Newbury Park, CA has been selected by the EPA to participate in the ETV Program. | | | Smart Sonic provides a complete process for cleaning solder paste, SMD adhesives and flux residue from stencils, misprinted PCBs and pallets used in surface mount assembly. The process is non-hazardous and replaces solvents such as CFCs, alcohol, and terpenes with an aqueous detergent that cleans all types of solder paste at ambient temperature. | | | The EPA and Air Quality Management Districts have eliminated CFCs and are now coming down hard on VOCs such as alcohol, terpenes, etc. that contribute to smog and pose a flammable/explosion hazard to the workspace. Expect to see more programs like the ETV in the near future. | | | A similar proactive program is put on by California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) called the "Clean Air Solvent" (CAS) Program. The chemistry used in the Smart Sonic Stencil Cleaning Process, 440-R SMT Detergent, has already been certified by the Air Quality Management District as a "Clean Air Solvent." The term "solvent" is used loosely to include any cleaning chemistry - aqueous or not. The CAS Program started in California in 1997 and is slated to begin in other states soon. As Dave says, "stay tuned!" | | | For more information about the ETV and/or CAS Programs, go to the following URL: | | | http://www.smartsonic.com/news.cfm | | Bill, | | Most of us have evolved watching all these wonderful changes. Most of them (concerning CFC's | | and the like) are great. I still wonder where ETV, AQMD, and the rest are going and what role, if any, ISO 14000 (do we need another one of these) plays in our futures. I mean, if we are | | so environmentally conscious and strictly regulated by mandate in this country, do we need | | another ISO to get us off the dime? | | Earl Moon | Earl, | The EPA and AQMD have been around a lot longer than ISO. I don't see the EPA program (ETV) or the AQMD program (CAS) as another ISO. I think these regulatory agencies are trying to prevent another mass exodus of companies out of such states as California because of strict environmental regulations. We all know "Big Brother" is going to regulate the environment. The ETV and CAS Programs are just an attempt to take some of the sting out of it. | Best regards, | Bill I read you loud and clear Bill. However, we had MIL-Q-9858 since 1963 (Rev A as it is still even though given over to ISO) and it became the cornerstone of ISO 9000 without our country's finest "craftsmen" (quality goes in before the name goes on - "Zenith" circa 1950's and '60's hype before Iococa) embracing it as a sound quality system as ours - without European "marketing" intervention. I realize we are environmentally conscious because of government dictates attempting to overcome greed (oxymoron as who's greedy? - the government or us or is the government really us) as people actually get locked up for "dumping" when caught, but don't we need some kind of unification instead of so many fragmented regulations and regulators?

Respectfully, Earl Moon

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Dave F

#15790

Re: Environmental Issues / Lead Thread On IPC | 25 May, 1998

| Y'all: IPC set-up a site addressing the environmental issues of the printed circuit fabrication industry. Some of it is interesting and applicable to the assembly business as well, even though not aimed directly at assemblers. IPC has recently told me that they plan to broaden the focus of the site to directly apply the assemblers. Stay tuned. Dave | http://www.pwbrc.org/ Y'all: Without trying to inspire undue ranting, there is a treat running on IPC about lead. Dave

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