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What's the most reliable chipshooter ???

FRANK

#15123

What's the most reliable chipshooter ??? | 8 July, 1998

I am looking for a chipshooter capable of installing tape fed smt parts on tape up to 32mm. Chipshooter speed on 8mm components must be a minimum of 12K per hour. Reliability, customer service and price are the gating issues. Please help me make a decision by sharing your experiences with me. No salesmen please.

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Jon Medernach

#15135

Re: What do you expect to hear? | 8 July, 1998

Going to SMT from THT you will find a tremendous difference in machine reliability. All the chip shooters are 99.9+%. Fuji has the largest market share in the US so you will hear alot about Fuji. In the Far East the Create chipshooter by Panasonic KME is the leading seller because it is faster and more flexible and more accurate than the Fuji, Sanyo, or Panasert. Don't be fooled Frank, everyone's a saleman, if only to justify their own decision. Look at your product and choose the best machine for you. Everyone has good service, some better than others dependant on your location. Good luck | I am looking for a chipshooter capable of installing tape fed smt parts on tape up to 32mm. Chipshooter speed on 8mm components must be a minimum of 12K per hour. Reliability, customer service and price are the gating issues. Please help me make a decision by sharing your experiences with me. No salesmen please.

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Wayne Bracy

#15131

Re: What's the most reliable chipshooter ??? | 8 July, 1998

| I am looking for a chipshooter capable of installing tape fed smt parts on tape up to 32mm. Chipshooter speed on 8mm components must be a minimum of 12K per hour. Reliability, customer service and price are the gating issues. Please help me make a decision by sharing your experiences with me. No salesmen please.

Frank: Take a look at the Panasonic KME chip shooter. You will like the flexibility and service support. You should also look at Fuji and compare features. As for salemen think you will find some of them (us) that aren't bad guys, as well. Wayne

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smd

#15128

Re: Why Dry After DI? | 9 July, 1998

OK, I'll take a little abuse as long as you guys are giving me all this great advice. I am concerned about what might happen when a drop here and there comes from the connectors and is absorbed into the box. The box is going to suffer from this. I am going to shell out maybe 3-4K on these boxes (carboard W. burried shielding and some sort of silverish film on the surface) and can't have them getting soggy when filled with 10K worth of boards. What can I do?

| smd: I think the idiom is "schmuck," rather than "putz." ;-) | What are you concerned about? That the residual water in the 80 pin connector housing will flow down the boards and rot-out the bottom of your new boxes? Dave F | | I am about to place a huge PO for ESD boxes. Our | | assemblies need to be placed horizontally in the | | stainless racks until wavesoldered, but after the | | wash they will be placed in the boxes. The boxes | | have a conductive film but they are still cardboard | | boxes (Plastic is too expensive). So am I going to | | be the company putz for all time? I use an | | Electrovert H-400 Hydroclean. What do you guys | | suggest? Am I going to be OK? I just got the VP | | to approve this <20 minutes ago and now I read | | about this! I know a little water could sometimes | | get into our 80 pin connectors, but I thought I'd | | be OK. | | | | Aside from process flows where the next step is: | | | 1 Powering-up an assembly | | | 2 Testing the assembly on electronic test equipment | | | Is there a reason (need) to dry assemblies after water washing followed by a DI water rinse? Or is air drying OK? | | | Dave F

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Steve Gregory

#15129

Re: Why Dry After DI? Or does smd have to pay for the boxes outta his pay check? | 9 July, 1998

Hey there smd... Don't worry, I don't think you'll be the company shmuck, or putz, or doofus, or bone-head, or geek, or ding-bat, or...or...(hmmm, can't think of anything else at the moment)...but you catch my drift, don't ya? I only mean that unless there's something that you've not shared with us that we should know about...(GRIN). Just ribbin' ya'!! I think you'll be okay, those boxes can take quite a bit of abuse...I mean you don't wanna go putting dripping wet assemblies in them, but they can get a little wet and still be okay as long as they dry out in between moisture periods. We used those boxes to deliver finished boards to one of our customers final assembly building where they would test and do the final box assembly of the servers and hubs they built. We would pick-up the empty boxes at their building from the previous days delivery, and once in a while we would have to do that in the rain. The boxes would get a little wet but they would survive... Best thing to do if they get pretty wet though, is to take everything out of them if there is boards in there, and let the box dry before you carry anything else in them...that's when the damage is done, trying to carry something in them if they're wet. -Steve Gregory-

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Phil

#15127

Solder Paste Evaluation | 9 July, 1998

I am looking for some guidelines on evaluating solder paste. I am specifically interested in No-Clean Pastes, as they are a completely new ball game when it comes to slump, tack time, stencil life, tack time, etc. Thanks for any and all help given

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Wayne

#15130

Re: Why Dry After DI? Or does smd have to pay for the boxes outta his pay check? | 10 July, 1998

| Hey there smd... | Don't worry, I don't think you'll be the company shmuck, or putz, or doofus, or bone-head, or geek, or ding-bat, or...or...(hmmm, can't think of anything else at the moment)...but you catch my drift, don't ya? I only mean that unless there's something that you've not shared with us that we should know about...(GRIN).

Steve /Steve: Take it easy, can't understand why anyone would want to use wet boxes or place boards in a box when they are wet. Lets take care of the customer and provide amle time to dry the boards. 5 P's Prior Planing Prevents Piss Poor Performance.(gues that's the 6 P's) How much moisture could there be on any board that would cause damage to the packing material. I think I would worry that the boards would be damaged more if wet and placed in an esd type wrapping? As for rain in California, you guys know what rain really is. Should be in New England we had 24 days with rain in June... Wayne ps still not use to this new keyboard.

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Greg Flynn

#15126

Re: What's the most reliable chipshooter ??? | 15 July, 1998

Check out Pentus Technologies,(www.pentus.com) they have a flexible machine capable of placing 40K/hr. Regards, Greg

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Dave Kalen

#15134

Re: What's the most reliable chipshooter ??? | 15 July, 1998

| | I am looking for a chipshooter capable of installing tape fed smt parts on tape up to 32mm. Chipshooter speed on 8mm components must be a minimum of 12K per hour. Reliability, customer service and price are the gating issues. Please help me make a decision by sharing your experiences with me. No salesmen please. | | Frank: | Take a look at the Panasonic KME chip shooter. You will like the flexibility and service support. | You should also look at Fuji and compare features. | As for salemen think you will find some of them (us) that aren't bad guys, as well. | Wayne

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Dave Kalen

#15133

Re: What's the most reliable chipshooter ??? | 15 July, 1998

| | I am looking for a chipshooter capable of installing tape fed smt parts on tape up to 32mm. Chipshooter speed on 8mm components must be a minimum of 12K per hour. Reliability, customer service and price are the gating issues. Please help me make a decision by sharing your experiences with me. No salesmen please. | | Frank: | Take a look at the Panasonic KME chip shooter. You will like the flexibility and service support. | You should also look at Fuji and compare features. | As for salemen think you will find some of them (us) that aren't bad guys, as well. | Wayne

You should look at the Sanyo systems also, Even though I have to agree that many salespeople don't know much, there are exceptions to that rule as Wayne said.

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Chuck

#15125

Re: What's the most reliable chipshooter ??? | 17 July, 1998

| I am looking for a chipshooter capable of installing tape fed smt parts on tape up to 32mm. Chipshooter speed on 8mm components must be a minimum of 12K per hour. Reliability, customer service and price are the gating issues. Please help me make a decision by sharing your experiences with me. No salesmen please. Frank, I am not a salesman (officially) but I play one on TV. Seriously though, I am the Refurbishment Manager with Philips in Alpharetta GA. I honestly can't tell you who makes the most reliable chipshooter, but I can tell you the Comet can do what you are asking. Of course, you didn't ask for much (just component size, speed and reliability). What Jon said is true, you have to compare the application to the machine before an intelligent decision can be made. Without going through the sales song and dance, a used Comet will be competitively priced and there aren't many on the used market so they must be reliable, otherwise people would be getting rid of them. If you want new, the Sapphire is our latest and greatest.

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Rin OR

#15124

Re: What's the most reliable chipshooter ??? | 17 July, 1998

| I am looking for a chipshooter capable of installing tape fed smt parts on tape up to 32mm. Chipshooter speed on 8mm components must be a minimum of 12K per hour. Reliability, customer service and price are the gating issues. Please help me make a decision by sharing your experiences with me. No salesmen please. If you are just looking for Chipshooter only , you can look at FUJI, Sanyo, Panasonic KME, Panasert and Universals, they all met your requirement, fast and expensive. If you wanted the completed line from one machine manufacturing, FUJI and Universal would be the best to look at. Also I am not the saleman and all the equipments I had mention above I had been working on it before. Hope this help!!! Rin

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Jim Price

#15132

Re: What's the most reliable chipshooter ??? | 4 August, 1998

| | I am looking for a chipshooter capable of installing tape fed smt parts on tape up to 32mm. Chipshooter speed on 8mm components must be a minimum of 12K per hour. Reliability, customer service and price are the gating issues. Please help me make a decision by sharing your experiences with me. No salesmen please. | I am a sales schmuck but that doesn't take away from the fact that the Panasert MV2F supports up to 44mm tape and will just about triple the 8mm part speed you mention. Further, it will do .5mm TSOP's at 30K / hour. | Frank: | Take a look at the Panasonic KME chip shooter. You will like the flexibility and service support. | You should also look at Fuji and compare features. | As for salemen think you will find some of them (us) that aren't bad guys, as well. | Wayne

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