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Solder Recovery System (SRS)

Chrys

#13883

Solder Recovery System (SRS) | 9 October, 1998

Dave F asked me for an update on the SRS we evaluated last month...

I like this machine. Over 80% of your wave dross is actually good solder; you just can't get to it without some type of separating agent. I like the mechanical sepration method much more than the chemical method like Kleenox (Maybe becuase I'm a mechanical engineer and electrons elude me!)

The SRS works by heating the dross to about 580F and squishing it between two hydraulic pistons. The good solder is squeezed out into an tray below where it is cast as an ingot for return to the solder pot. The dross that is left it "swept" into a chute where it falls into a regualr reclaim bucket.

The machines themselves run on 208/220V electricity, have thier own filtration systems, and are on carts on wheels so they can be rolled from machine to machine. They come in 15 and 30 lb models. They run about $20K, depending on size and options.

Considering that an operation loses anywhere from $1.25 to $2.00 per pound of dross produced depending on their consumtion and pricing, it doesn't take long to get payback on this machine. I calculated that my operation would get payback in 7 months, and then save up to $40K per year thereafter by reusing solder. I've taled to some of my friends that have them & they really like them.

Okay, so there's got to be some drawbacks, right? -Well, the ingot that gets cast has some dross on top of it. It kind of falls through the solder-squeezing cracks during the "sweeping" operation. They tell me that it's only on the surface. -If you put too much dross in, you'll overfill your ingot tray - makes it kind of hard to remove. - For how ever much solder/dross you put in, you get about 2/3 back. So you still have some that goes off to reclaim. - An unproven theory that has been discussed - reusing solder will reintroduce contaminants into the pot. You may, in two or three years, end up with dangerously high levels of copper or other solderpot-unfriendly metals.

Overall, I think it's a worthy machine. I want one. The benefits far outweigh the minor drawbacks in my opinion.

A few more things I'm looking at before purchasing - We now have the capability to do dross inclusion tests on bar solder. So first I'm gonna cut my ingot in the machine shop to see if the dross really is on the top. Then I'm gonna run the dross inclusion tests to see how this solder measures up with commercial virgin and reclaim bar products.

Finally, my sister plant in Florida just purchsed one and will be able to give me the production-worthy evaluation in a few months.

I'll keep the forum posted.

Chrys

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Dave F

#13884

Re: Solder Recovery System (SRS) | 9 October, 1998

| Dave F asked me for an update on the SRS we evaluated last month... | | I like this machine. Over 80% of your wave dross is actually good solder; you just can't get to it without some type of separating agent. I like the mechanical sepration method much more than the chemical method like Kleenox (Maybe becuase I'm a mechanical engineer and electrons elude me!) | | The SRS works by heating the dross to about 580F and squishing it between two hydraulic pistons. The good solder is squeezed out into an tray below where it is cast as an ingot for return to the solder pot. The dross that is left it "swept" into a chute where it falls into a regualr reclaim bucket. | | The machines themselves run on 208/220V electricity, have thier own filtration systems, and are on carts on wheels so they can be rolled from machine to machine. They come in 15 and 30 lb models. They run about $20K, depending on size and options. | | Considering that an operation loses anywhere from $1.25 to $2.00 per pound of dross produced depending on their consumtion and pricing, it doesn't take long to get payback on this machine. I calculated that my operation would get payback in 7 months, and then save up to $40K per year thereafter by reusing solder. I've taled to some of my friends that have them & they really like them. | | Okay, so there's got to be some drawbacks, right? | -Well, the ingot that gets cast has some dross on top of it. It kind of falls through the solder-squeezing cracks during the "sweeping" operation. They tell me that it's only on the surface. | -If you put too much dross in, you'll overfill your ingot tray - makes it kind of hard to remove. | - For how ever much solder/dross you put in, you get about 2/3 back. So you still have some that goes off to reclaim. | - An unproven theory that has been discussed - reusing solder will reintroduce contaminants into the pot. You may, in two or three years, end up with dangerously high levels of copper or other solderpot-unfriendly metals. | | Overall, I think it's a worthy machine. I want one. The benefits far outweigh the minor drawbacks in my opinion. | | A few more things I'm looking at before purchasing - We now have the capability to do dross inclusion tests on bar solder. So first I'm gonna cut my ingot in the machine shop to see if the dross really is on the top. Then I'm gonna run the dross inclusion tests to see how this solder measures up with commercial virgin and reclaim bar products. | | Finally, my sister plant in Florida just purchsed one and will be able to give me the production-worthy evaluation in a few months. | | I'll keep the forum posted. | | Chrys | Thank you. Good job. Does this mean your sister is a gear head also? ;-) Dave F

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