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Blood letting on stencil printer

Earl Moon

#13857

Blood letting on stencil printer | 13 October, 1998

We suffered our first blood letting because of razor sharp edge clamps (DEK 265LT) and operator giving it the finger. While positioning magnetic tooling pins, one of our best slipped and really sliced off a part of his main digit. This will impact his ability to promote proper road rage inducement for some time - not to mention other possible and important uses for the ever popular middle finger.

We now cover the clamp edges during tooling pin setup and all operations where the operator might tangle with the little devils. Just thought I'd share this happening with all you DEK printers.

Earl Moon

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Justin Medernach

#13858

Re: Blood letting on stencil printer | 13 October, 1998

| We suffered our first blood letting because of razor sharp edge clamps (DEK 265LT) and operator giving it the finger. While positioning magnetic tooling pins, one of our best slipped and really sliced off a part of his main digit. This will impact his ability to promote proper road rage inducement for some time - not to mention other possible and important uses for the ever popular middle finger. | | We now cover the clamp edges during tooling pin setup and all operations where the operator might tangle with the little devils. Just thought I'd share this happening with all you DEK printers. | | Earl Moon | Earl, That's always been a very unintelligent feature on the DEK printers. You're not kidding when you say that clamp is razor sharp. I've peeled my pinky on it a couple of times. The other bad thing about that overclamp is the standoff it creates on the edge of the board. I had a packed board once with fine pitch out near the edges and there were no breakaways on the board. I'll be damned if the row of leads on the fine pitch device nearest the clamp didn't always short on me. Edge clamping is the way to go. Overclamping just doesn't cut it..... oh wait a minute, in defense of DEK, at least it cuts the operator.

Justin

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Earl Moon

#13859

Re: Blood letting on stencil printer | 13 October, 1998

| | We suffered our first blood letting because of razor sharp edge clamps (DEK 265LT) and operator giving it the finger. While positioning magnetic tooling pins, one of our best slipped and really sliced off a part of his main digit. This will impact his ability to promote proper road rage inducement for some time - not to mention other possible and important uses for the ever popular middle finger. | | | | We now cover the clamp edges during tooling pin setup and all operations where the operator might tangle with the little devils. Just thought I'd share this happening with all you DEK printers. | | | | Earl Moon | | | Earl, | That's always been a very unintelligent feature on the DEK printers. You're not kidding when you say that clamp is razor sharp. I've peeled my pinky on it a couple of times. The other bad thing about that overclamp is the standoff it creates on the edge of the board. I had a packed board once with fine pitch out near the edges and there were no breakaways on the board. I'll be damned if the row of leads on the fine pitch device nearest the clamp didn't always short on me. Edge clamping is the way to go. Overclamping just doesn't cut it..... oh wait a minute, in defense of DEK, at least it cuts the operator. | | Justin | Justin,

Great to see from you again. Yes, I know of that which you speak concerning getting the stencil down on fine pitch. There is a space.

Why doesn'e DEK do something useful like providing real edge clamps or push ins like normal people. Maybe the head chopping (can't spell guillotine) isn't over in merry old England.

Thanks for the response,

Earl Moon

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Tony B

#13860

Re: Avoiding Blood letting on stencil printer | 14 October, 1998

| | | We suffered our first blood letting because of razor sharp edge clamps (DEK 265LT) and operator giving it the finger. While positioning magnetic tooling pins, one of our best slipped and really sliced off a part of his main digit. This will impact his ability to promote proper road rage inducement for some time - not to mention other possible and important uses for the ever popular middle finger. | | | | | | We now cover the clamp edges during tooling pin setup and all operations where the operator might tangle with the little devils. Just thought I'd share this happening with all you DEK printers. | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | Earl, | | That's always been a very unintelligent feature on the DEK printers. You're not kidding when you say that clamp is razor sharp. I've peeled my pinky on it a couple of times. The other bad thing about that overclamp is the standoff it creates on the edge of the board. I had a packed board once with fine pitch out near the edges and there were no breakaways on the board. I'll be damned if the row of leads on the fine pitch device nearest the clamp didn't always short on me. Edge clamping is the way to go. Overclamping just doesn't cut it..... oh wait a minute, in defense of DEK, at least it cuts the operator. | | | | Justin | | | Justin, | | Great to see from you again. Yes, I know of that which you speak concerning getting the stencil down on fine pitch. There is a space. | | Why doesn'e DEK do something useful like providing real edge clamps or push ins like normal people. Maybe the head chopping (can't spell guillotine) isn't over in merry old England. | | Thanks for the response, | | Earl Moon

Gentlemen,

Sorry to be a bore but if you carried out risk assessments on your processes you would have been aware of the the hazards and your guy might still have his digit undamaged. Old adage: A craftsman never blames his tools.

Tony B

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Earl Moon

#13861

Re: Avoiding Blood letting on stencil printer | 14 October, 1998

| | | | We suffered our first blood letting because of razor sharp edge clamps (DEK 265LT) and operator giving it the finger. While positioning magnetic tooling pins, one of our best slipped and really sliced off a part of his main digit. This will impact his ability to promote proper road rage inducement for some time - not to mention other possible and important uses for the ever popular middle finger. | | | | | | | | We now cover the clamp edges during tooling pin setup and all operations where the operator might tangle with the little devils. Just thought I'd share this happening with all you DEK printers. | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | Earl, | | | That's always been a very unintelligent feature on the DEK printers. You're not kidding when you say that clamp is razor sharp. I've peeled my pinky on it a couple of times. The other bad thing about that overclamp is the standoff it creates on the edge of the board. I had a packed board once with fine pitch out near the edges and there were no breakaways on the board. I'll be damned if the row of leads on the fine pitch device nearest the clamp didn't always short on me. Edge clamping is the way to go. Overclamping just doesn't cut it..... oh wait a minute, in defense of DEK, at least it cuts the operator. | | | | | | Justin | | | | | Justin, | | | | Great to see from you again. Yes, I know of that which you speak concerning getting the stencil down on fine pitch. There is a space. | | | | Why doesn'e DEK do something useful like providing real edge clamps or push ins like normal people. Maybe the head chopping (can't spell guillotine) isn't over in merry old England. | | | | Thanks for the response, | | | | Earl Moon | | Gentlemen, | | Sorry to be a bore but if you carried out risk assessments on your processes you would have been aware of the the hazards and your guy might still have his digit undamaged. | Old adage: A craftsman never blames his tools. | | Tony B | | No boredom taken. Point well made. Risk assessment effective. Safety procedures not effective when not followed. This was a message to all concerning safety when working in and around moving, sharp, and otherwise "onr'y chinery" because it can be dangerous out there.

I'm glad everyone uses the head support assembly. I would hate, one morning, to see the DEK "Trex" having an operator's legs sticking out of its mouth.

Also, I am growing rather fond of the "DEKster" except for those notable exceptions. I've always been an MPM kind of guy, but DEK has a lot to offer. It would be even better without the sharp edges.

Earl Moon

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Justin Medernach

#13862

Re: Avoiding Blood letting on stencil printer | 14 October, 1998

| | | | | We suffered our first blood letting because of razor sharp edge clamps (DEK 265LT) and operator giving it the finger. While positioning magnetic tooling pins, one of our best slipped and really sliced off a part of his main digit. This will impact his ability to promote proper road rage inducement for some time - not to mention other possible and important uses for the ever popular middle finger. | | | | | | | | | | We now cover the clamp edges during tooling pin setup and all operations where the operator might tangle with the little devils. Just thought I'd share this happening with all you DEK printers. | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | That's always been a very unintelligent feature on the DEK printers. You're not kidding when you say that clamp is razor sharp. I've peeled my pinky on it a couple of times. The other bad thing about that overclamp is the standoff it creates on the edge of the board. I had a packed board once with fine pitch out near the edges and there were no breakaways on the board. I'll be damned if the row of leads on the fine pitch device nearest the clamp didn't always short on me. Edge clamping is the way to go. Overclamping just doesn't cut it..... oh wait a minute, in defense of DEK, at least it cuts the operator. | | | | | | | | Justin | | | | | | | Justin, | | | | | | Great to see from you again. Yes, I know of that which you speak concerning getting the stencil down on fine pitch. There is a space. | | | | | | Why doesn'e DEK do something useful like providing real edge clamps or push ins like normal people. Maybe the head chopping (can't spell guillotine) isn't over in merry old England. | | | | | | Thanks for the response, | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | Gentlemen, | | | | Sorry to be a bore but if you carried out risk assessments on your processes you would have been aware of the the hazards and your guy might still have his digit undamaged. | | Old adage: A craftsman never blames his tools. | | | | Tony B | | | | No boredom taken. Point well made. Risk assessment effective. Safety procedures not effective when not followed. This was a message to all concerning safety when working in and around moving, sharp, and otherwise "onr'y chinery" because it can be dangerous out there. | | I'm glad everyone uses the head support assembly. I would hate, one morning, to see the DEK "Trex" having an operator's legs sticking out of its mouth. | | Also, I am growing rather fond of the "DEKster" except for those notable exceptions. I've always been an MPM kind of guy, but DEK has a lot to offer. It would be even better without the sharp edges. | | Earl Moon | Tony, Slap to the head well taken. I'm relatively new to this kind of thing and I would have never even thought to consider an operator injury type assessment. I kind of thought it was always an unwritten rule, "As long as you keep your paws out of it, when it runs, you're all set." Thanks for the lesson.

Sincerely, Justin Medernach Mfg. Eng. Flextronics Int'l PIC East

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Earl Moon

#13863

Re: Avoiding Blood letting on stencil printer | 14 October, 1998

| | | | | | We suffered our first blood letting because of razor sharp edge clamps (DEK 265LT) and operator giving it the finger. While positioning magnetic tooling pins, one of our best slipped and really sliced off a part of his main digit. This will impact his ability to promote proper road rage inducement for some time - not to mention other possible and important uses for the ever popular middle finger. | | | | | | | | | | | | We now cover the clamp edges during tooling pin setup and all operations where the operator might tangle with the little devils. Just thought I'd share this happening with all you DEK printers. | | | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | That's always been a very unintelligent feature on the DEK printers. You're not kidding when you say that clamp is razor sharp. I've peeled my pinky on it a couple of times. The other bad thing about that overclamp is the standoff it creates on the edge of the board. I had a packed board once with fine pitch out near the edges and there were no breakaways on the board. I'll be damned if the row of leads on the fine pitch device nearest the clamp didn't always short on me. Edge clamping is the way to go. Overclamping just doesn't cut it..... oh wait a minute, in defense of DEK, at least it cuts the operator. | | | | | | | | | | Justin | | | | | | | | | Justin, | | | | | | | | Great to see from you again. Yes, I know of that which you speak concerning getting the stencil down on fine pitch. There is a space. | | | | | | | | Why doesn'e DEK do something useful like providing real edge clamps or push ins like normal people. Maybe the head chopping (can't spell guillotine) isn't over in merry old England. | | | | | | | | Thanks for the response, | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | Gentlemen, | | | | | | Sorry to be a bore but if you carried out risk assessments on your processes you would have been aware of the the hazards and your guy might still have his digit undamaged. | | | Old adage: A craftsman never blames his tools. | | | | | | Tony B | | | | | | No boredom taken. Point well made. Risk assessment effective. Safety procedures not effective when not followed. This was a message to all concerning safety when working in and around moving, sharp, and otherwise "onr'y chinery" because it can be dangerous out there. | | | | I'm glad everyone uses the head support assembly. I would hate, one morning, to see the DEK "Trex" having an operator's legs sticking out of its mouth. | | | | Also, I am growing rather fond of the "DEKster" except for those notable exceptions. I've always been an MPM kind of guy, but DEK has a lot to offer. It would be even better without the sharp edges. | | | | Earl Moon | | | Tony, | Slap to the head well taken. I'm relatively new to this kind of thing and I would have never even thought to consider an operator injury type assessment. I kind of thought it was always an unwritten rule, "As long as you keep your paws out of it, when it runs, you're all set." Thanks for the lesson. | | Sincerely, | Justin Medernach | Mfg. Eng. | Flextronics Int'l | PIC East | Everyone,

The lesson in all this has to be protect your most valuable investment. It is not the equipement. It is the operator. Risk assessment is the first place to start, in some people's minds. Who would have thought about injury taking from production efficiency and effectiveness.

I think Tony did. However, after making the right evaluation comes the safety then material handling procedure.

It's fine to have the best facilities, equipment, and tools. Without well trained process managers, there is nothing.

Earl Moon

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#18183

Re: Avoiding Blood letting on stencil printer | 15 November, 2001

Although this is a old message, I would like to add that DEK do offer a edge clamping option on ALL 265 class machines, thereby removing those sharp edges from the machine.

Regards

Mark.

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CAL

#18197

Re: Avoiding Blood letting on stencil printer | 17 November, 2001

TONY- I don't beleive the Craftsman called this posting in. Nurses are not supose to stick themselves with needles, Carpenters are not supose to get splinters, Electricians should never get shocked.....but in reallity it happens. Risk assesment is a great Idea and works well in some cases but does not replace common sense. OSHA even has a small understanding of this (or Steak knives would have to be stamped "Sharp Object").

Could you help people out a little further and give them some web links to sites for risk assessment incase they have no Idea what you are talking about? I am on the road and do not have my site listings.

EARL- Thanks for the FYI....Information like this can only help others prepare for whats down the road.

Cal

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SP700avi inline smt screen printer