Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


Dross Skimmin'

Dave F

#13375

Dross Skimmin' | 30 November, 1998

All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot.

On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web.

How do you know when to skim dross?

Dave F

reply »

Earl Moon

#13376

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 30 November, 1998

| All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot. | | On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web. | | How do you know when to skim dross? | | Dave F | Ah Dave, you're going to love this. Sacrifice nothing for solder joint quality. Skim, skim, skim.

Nothwistanding the fact dross protects solder from oxidation, it is oxidation. What do you have in your mind to set us all up this way?

Earl Moon

reply »

Dave f

#13377

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 1 December, 1998

| | All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot. | | | | On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web. | | | | How do you know when to skim dross? | | | | Dave F | | | Ah Dave, you're going to love this. Sacrifice nothing for solder joint quality. Skim, skim, skim. | | Nothwistanding the fact dross protects solder from oxidation, it is oxidation. What do you have in your mind to set us all up this way? | | Earl Moon | Earl: It's not a "set-up" ... it's a dilemma. Dave F

reply »

Earl Moon

#13378

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 1 December, 1998

| | | All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot. | | | | | | On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web. | | | | | | How do you know when to skim dross? | | | | | | Dave F | | | | | Ah Dave, you're going to love this. Sacrifice nothing for solder joint quality. Skim, skim, skim. | | | | Nothwistanding the fact dross protects solder from oxidation, it is oxidation. What do you have in your mind to set us all up this way? | | | | Earl Moon | | | Earl: It's not a "set-up" ... it's a dilemma. Dave F | Dave,

You always pose provocative questions and issues. I apologize for expecting this was another. After all, I look to you for advice.

As for the dilemma, what's the problem. I mean, "norman" solder pots and waves form oxides. It can't be avoided unless in an inert atmosphere - then only to a much lesser degree.

I always opt on the side of keeping dross to a minimum without regarding its "protective" qualities. I don't want "crud" contaminated solder joints any more than I want excessively oxided ones.

Can other excessive metallic inclusions in the solder be causing poor solder joints? Dave, you know I, and so many others, am on your side. What's your problem?

Earl Moon

reply »

Dave F

#13379

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 1 December, 1998

| | | | All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot. | | | | | | | | On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web. | | | | | | | | How do you know when to skim dross? | | | | | | | | Dave F | | | | | | | Ah Dave, you're going to love this. Sacrifice nothing for solder joint quality. Skim, skim, skim. | | | | | | Nothwistanding the fact dross protects solder from oxidation, it is oxidation. What do you have in your mind to set us all up this way? | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | Earl: It's not a "set-up" ... it's a dilemma. Dave F | | | Dave, | | You always pose provocative questions and issues. I apologize for expecting this was another. After all, I look to you for advice. | | As for the dilemma, what's the problem. I mean, "norman" solder pots and waves form oxides. It can't be avoided unless in an inert atmosphere - then only to a much lesser degree. | | I always opt on the side of keeping dross to a minimum without regarding its "protective" qualities. I don't want "crud" contaminated solder joints any more than I want excessively oxided ones. | | Can other excessive metallic inclusions in the solder be causing poor solder joints? Dave, you know I, and so many others, am on your side. What's your problem? | | Earl Moon | Earl: Thank you for your input. My problem is: I'd like to be able to give wave solder operators guidelines on when to skim the dross from the solder pot. The guidelines should have low overall cost. So, we need excellant solder joints and worker safety and low solder loss. Somewhere between:

1 Having someone masked, suited, vented, and constantly skimming ... AND 2 Waiting until you see dross rafts going over the wave

Is a middle ground. I seek the middle ground. That's it. TTYL Dave F

reply »

Earl Moon

#13380

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 1 December, 1998

| | | | | All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot. | | | | | | | | | | On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web. | | | | | | | | | | How do you know when to skim dross? | | | | | | | | | | Dave F | | | | | | | | | Ah Dave, you're going to love this. Sacrifice nothing for solder joint quality. Skim, skim, skim. | | | | | | | | Nothwistanding the fact dross protects solder from oxidation, it is oxidation. What do you have in your mind to set us all up this way? | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | Earl: It's not a "set-up" ... it's a dilemma. Dave F | | | | | Dave, | | | | You always pose provocative questions and issues. I apologize for expecting this was another. After all, I look to you for advice. | | | | As for the dilemma, what's the problem. I mean, "norman" solder pots and waves form oxides. It can't be avoided unless in an inert atmosphere - then only to a much lesser degree. | | | | I always opt on the side of keeping dross to a minimum without regarding its "protective" qualities. I don't want "crud" contaminated solder joints any more than I want excessively oxided ones. | | | | Can other excessive metallic inclusions in the solder be causing poor solder joints? Dave, you know I, and so many others, am on your side. What's your problem? | | | | Earl Moon | | | Earl: Thank you for your input. My problem is: I'd like to be able to give wave solder operators guidelines on when to skim the dross from the solder pot. The guidelines should have low overall cost. So, we need excellant solder joints and worker safety and low solder loss. Somewhere between: | | 1 Having someone masked, suited, vented, and constantly skimming ... AND | 2 Waiting until you see dross rafts going over the wave | | Is a middle ground. I seek the middle ground. That's it. TTYL Dave F | Dave,

I knew that? Hell, you know it's all a compromise. How do the solder joints look - when?

I have to say, I've never have been so impressed with doss reduction as while writing process procedures for a nitrogen "fired" wave soldering machine. It's both unreal and understandable how a nitrogen blanket and direct injection, into the solder pot, virtually eliminates oxidation and dross formation. Talking of cost - astronomical initally but maybe the long run it works economically. Talking about no-clean and VOC free, this is the way to go.

Damn, I love this stuff almost as much as you.

Enjoy,

Earl Moon

reply »

Brian Conner

#13381

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 1 December, 1998

| | | | | | All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot. | | | | | | | | | | | | On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web. | | | | | | | | | | | | How do you know when to skim dross? | | | | | | | | | | | | Dave F | | | | | | | | | | | Ah Dave, you're going to love this. Sacrifice nothing for solder joint quality. Skim, skim, skim. | | | | | | | | | | Nothwistanding the fact dross protects solder from oxidation, it is oxidation. What do you have in your mind to set us all up this way? | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | Earl: It's not a "set-up" ... it's a dilemma. Dave F | | | | | | | Dave, | | | | | | You always pose provocative questions and issues. I apologize for expecting this was another. After all, I look to you for advice. | | | | | | As for the dilemma, what's the problem. I mean, "norman" solder pots and waves form oxides. It can't be avoided unless in an inert atmosphere - then only to a much lesser degree. | | | | | | I always opt on the side of keeping dross to a minimum without regarding its "protective" qualities. I don't want "crud" contaminated solder joints any more than I want excessively oxided ones. | | | | | | Can other excessive metallic inclusions in the solder be causing poor solder joints? Dave, you know I, and so many others, am on your side. What's your problem? | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | Earl: Thank you for your input. My problem is: I'd like to be able to give wave solder operators guidelines on when to skim the dross from the solder pot. The guidelines should have low overall cost. So, we need excellant solder joints and worker safety and low solder loss. Somewhere between: | | | | 1 Having someone masked, suited, vented, and constantly skimming ... AND | | 2 Waiting until you see dross rafts going over the wave | | | | Is a middle ground. I seek the middle ground. That's it. TTYL Dave F | | | Dave, | | I knew that? Hell, you know it's all a compromise. How do the solder joints look - when? | | I have to say, I've never have been so impressed with doss reduction as while writing process procedures for a nitrogen "fired" wave soldering machine. It's both unreal and understandable how a nitrogen blanket and direct injection, into the solder pot, virtually eliminates oxidation and dross formation. Talking of cost - astronomical initally but maybe the long run it works economically. Talking about no-clean and VOC free, this is the way to go. | | Damn, I love this stuff almost as much as you. | | Enjoy, | | Earl Moon | Have either one of you seen or used a SRS machine? I had one in for a demo - very impressive. The original model was a little too awkward for production to use, however, the newer model is a little easier to use. The biggest problem that I had with the machine was it's capacity - I think that they expanded the capacity.

reply »

John

#13382

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 1 December, 1998

| | | | | | | All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | How do you know when to skim dross? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Dave F | | | | | | | | | | | | | Ah Dave, you're going to love this. Sacrifice nothing for solder joint quality. Skim, skim, skim. | | | | | | | | | | | | Nothwistanding the fact dross protects solder from oxidation, it is oxidation. What do you have in your mind to set us all up this way? | | | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | | | Earl: It's not a "set-up" ... it's a dilemma. Dave F | | | | | | | | | Dave, | | | | | | | | You always pose provocative questions and issues. I apologize for expecting this was another. After all, I look to you for advice. | | | | | | | | As for the dilemma, what's the problem. I mean, "norman" solder pots and waves form oxides. It can't be avoided unless in an inert atmosphere - then only to a much lesser degree. | | | | | | | | I always opt on the side of keeping dross to a minimum without regarding its "protective" qualities. I don't want "crud" contaminated solder joints any more than I want excessively oxided ones. | | | | | | | | Can other excessive metallic inclusions in the solder be causing poor solder joints? Dave, you know I, and so many others, am on your side. What's your problem? | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | Earl: Thank you for your input. My problem is: I'd like to be able to give wave solder operators guidelines on when to skim the dross from the solder pot. The guidelines should have low overall cost. So, we need excellant solder joints and worker safety and low solder loss. Somewhere between: | | | | | | 1 Having someone masked, suited, vented, and constantly skimming ... AND | | | 2 Waiting until you see dross rafts going over the wave | | | | | | Is a middle ground. I seek the middle ground. That's it. TTYL Dave F | | | | | Dave, | | | | I knew that? Hell, you know it's all a compromise. How do the solder joints look - when? | | | | I have to say, I've never have been so impressed with doss reduction as while writing process procedures for a nitrogen "fired" wave soldering machine. It's both unreal and understandable how a nitrogen blanket and direct injection, into the solder pot, virtually eliminates oxidation and dross formation. Talking of cost - astronomical initally but maybe the long run it works economically. Talking about no-clean and VOC free, this is the way to go. | | | | Damn, I love this stuff almost as much as you. | | | | Enjoy, | | | | Earl Moon | | | Have either one of you seen or used a SRS machine? I had | one in for a demo - very impressive. The original model was | a little too awkward for production to use, however, the newer | model is a little easier to use. The biggest problem that I had with the machine was it's capacity - I think that they expanded the capacity. | Hey Dave, If I can interject my 2 cents worth of opinion here...... The way we handeled it was to put our operaters on a maintenance schedule. they do certain things to the machine at scheduled times, like it or not... I based the schedule on the number of hours the machine is run. Whether it is twice daily, or once weekly, put the operators on a schedule as to when to clean the pot. To have them make a judgement call based on how deep it is getting..... is asking for trouble. Some operators will be in there every 10 minutes, Others will wait until the bottom of the boards come out of the machine like sandpaper. Depemding on the quantity of boards run, hours that the machine is run and your best judgement call, have the operators skim at the beginning of every shift, or every tuesday & thursday, or every monday.............whatever. Start consertive and monitor the board quality. If you change the interval or how you run the machine, just keep a close eye on the solder joints.

Good luck!!

reply »

Dave F

#13383

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 2 December, 1998

| | | | | | | All y'll: I could use your input on determining when to skim dross from a wave solder pot. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | On one hand, dross protects the surface of the solder from oxidation. On the other hand too much dross may affect solder joint quality. On another hand, over 60% of the weight of dross is virgin solder that is captured on the dross web. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | How do you know when to skim dross? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Dave F | | | | | | | | | | | | | Ah Dave, you're going to love this. Sacrifice nothing for solder joint quality. Skim, skim, skim. | | | | | | | | | | | | Nothwistanding the fact dross protects solder from oxidation, it is oxidation. What do you have in your mind to set us all up this way? | | | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | | | Earl: It's not a "set-up" ... it's a dilemma. Dave F | | | | | | | | | Dave, | | | | | | | | You always pose provocative questions and issues. I apologize for expecting this was another. After all, I look to you for advice. | | | | | | | | As for the dilemma, what's the problem. I mean, "norman" solder pots and waves form oxides. It can't be avoided unless in an inert atmosphere - then only to a much lesser degree. | | | | | | | | I always opt on the side of keeping dross to a minimum without regarding its "protective" qualities. I don't want "crud" contaminated solder joints any more than I want excessively oxided ones. | | | | | | | | Can other excessive metallic inclusions in the solder be causing poor solder joints? Dave, you know I, and so many others, am on your side. What's your problem? | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | Earl: Thank you for your input. My problem is: I'd like to be able to give wave solder operators guidelines on when to skim the dross from the solder pot. The guidelines should have low overall cost. So, we need excellant solder joints and worker safety and low solder loss. Somewhere between: | | | | | | 1 Having someone masked, suited, vented, and constantly skimming ... AND | | | 2 Waiting until you see dross rafts going over the wave | | | | | | Is a middle ground. I seek the middle ground. That's it. TTYL Dave F | | | | | Dave, | | | | I knew that? Hell, you know it's all a compromise. How do the solder joints look - when? | | | | I have to say, I've never have been so impressed with doss reduction as while writing process procedures for a nitrogen "fired" wave soldering machine. It's both unreal and understandable how a nitrogen blanket and direct injection, into the solder pot, virtually eliminates oxidation and dross formation. Talking of cost - astronomical initally but maybe the long run it works economically. Talking about no-clean and VOC free, this is the way to go. | | | | Damn, I love this stuff almost as much as you. | | | | Enjoy, | | | | Earl Moon | | | Have either one of you seen or used a SRS machine? I had | one in for a demo - very impressive. The original model was | a little too awkward for production to use, however, the newer | model is a little easier to use. The biggest problem that I had with the machine was it's capacity - I think that they expanded the capacity. | Brian: I have not used the SRS in the past year or so. Chrys has. There is several threads on SMTnet about the unit. Dave F

reply »

Jason

#13384

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 4 December, 1998

| | Have either one of you seen or used a SRS machine? I had | | one in for a demo - very impressive. The original model was | | a little too awkward for production to use, however, the newer | | model is a little easier to use. The biggest problem that I had with the machine was it's capacity - I think that they expanded the capacity. | |

----------------------------------------------------------------- I have used the SRS system from Fancort. My last company proved it out and we had been using 1 for over 2 years. They bought a second shortly after. I just finished writing an AR to purchase one for my new company. I will be getting the 30lb/bigger model you were reffering to. With a recovery on the average of 75% good reuseable solder, it wasn't hard to justify. In our case it will pay for itself in a little over 8 weeks. Anyone interested should check out Fancort's website @ http://www.fancort.com/products.htm

Earl & Dave, can't we all just get along? hehe. JKidding

Jason

reply »

Earl Moon

#13385

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 5 December, 1998

| | | Have either one of you seen or used a SRS machine? I had | | | one in for a demo - very impressive. The original model was | | | a little too awkward for production to use, however, the newer | | | model is a little easier to use. The biggest problem that I had with the machine was it's capacity - I think that they expanded the capacity. | | | | | ----------------------------------------------------------------- | I have used the SRS system from Fancort. My last company proved it out and we had been using 1 for over 2 years. They bought a second shortly after. I just finished writing an AR to purchase one for my new company. I will be getting the 30lb/bigger model you were reffering to. With a recovery on the average of 75% good reuseable solder, it wasn't hard to justify. In our case it will pay for itself in a little over 8 weeks. Anyone interested should check out Fancort's website @ http://www.fancort.com/products.htm | | Earl & Dave, can't we all just get along? hehe. JKidding | | Jason | See Dave,

When the elders begin play, the kids have to but in.

Jason, where the hell you been? Where's all your cohorts? Must be the holidays. Besides, I know you're hiding someting. What technical pot are you stiring now? No "Gates" paranoia here.

Earl Moon

reply »

Jason

#13386

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 7 December, 1998

| | | | Have either one of you seen or used a SRS machine? I had | | | | one in for a demo - very impressive. The original model was | | | | a little too awkward for production to use, however, the newer | | | | model is a little easier to use. The biggest problem that I had with the machine was it's capacity - I think that they expanded the capacity. | | | | | | | | ----------------------------------------------------------------- | | I have used the SRS system from Fancort. My last company proved it out and we had been using 1 for over 2 years. They bought a second shortly after. I just finished writing an AR to purchase one for my new company. I will be getting the 30lb/bigger model you were reffering to. With a recovery on the average of 75% good reuseable solder, it wasn't hard to justify. In our case it will pay for itself in a little over 8 weeks. Anyone interested should check out Fancort's website @ http://www.fancort.com/products.htm | | | | Earl & Dave, can't we all just get along? hehe. JKidding | | | | Jason | | | See Dave, | | When the elders begin play, the kids have to but in. | | Jason, where the hell you been? Where's all your cohorts? Must be the holidays. Besides, I know you're hiding someting. What technical pot are you stiring now? No "Gates" paranoia here. | | Earl Moon | Who's paranoid?

Nothing to hide Earl, I simply answered the man's question without all the proper english and sarcasum.

reply »

Erwin Dorol

#13387

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 9 December, 1998

| | | | |1. What is your minimum dross generated that triggers you to procure an SRS? 2. For a 8 to 10 Kg of dross generated daily, what capacity of SRS capable of recycling these amount of dross without compromising other cost factors? Or I have'nt reached the reqiured volume yet? 3. Can you recommend a brand name of SRS for this amount? 4. I am also thinking of converting to inert atmosphere, what do you think? Am I on the right track? Please respond,

Erwin Dorol Electronic Assemblies Inc, Philippines Have either one of you seen or used a SRS machine? I had | | | | | one in for a demo - very impressive. The original model was | | | | | a little too awkward for production to use, however, the newer | | | | | model is a little easier to use. The biggest problem that I had with the machine was it's capacity - I think that they expanded the capacity. | | | | | | | | | | | ----------------------------------------------------------------- | | | I have used the SRS system from Fancort. My last company proved it out and we had been using 1 for over 2 years. They bought a second shortly after. I just finished writing an AR to purchase one for my new company. I will be getting the 30lb/bigger model you were reffering to. With a recovery on the average of 75% good reuseable solder, it wasn't hard to justify. In our case it will pay for itself in a little over 8 weeks. Anyone interested should check out Fancort's website @ http://www.fancort.com/products.htm | | | | | | Earl & Dave, can't we all just get along? hehe. JKidding | | | | | | Jason | | | | | See Dave, | | | | When the elders begin play, the kids have to but in. | | | | Jason, where the hell you been? Where's all your cohorts? Must be the holidays. Besides, I know you're hiding someting. What technical pot are you stiring now? No "Gates" paranoia here. | | | | Earl Moon | | | Who's paranoid? | | Nothing to hide Earl, I simply answered the man's question without all the proper english and sarcasum. | | | | |

reply »

Dave F

#13388

Re: Dross Skimmin' | 9 December, 1998

Erwin: Responding to your questions:

>1. What is your minimum dross generated that triggers you to procure an SRS?

Your finance department probably has guidelines for the pay back of capital investments. Some companies use period of time to break-even. Others use a net present value calculation, based on their internal cost of money.

>2. For a 8 to 10 Kg of dross generated daily, what capacity of SRS capable of recycling these amount of dross without compromising other cost factors? Or I haven�t reached the required volume yet?

Last I checked SRSs come in 10 and 30 pound sizes.

Sample break-even calculation (using WAG numbers):

Daily savings using SRS = 8kg of dross/day * 75% recovery by SRS * 90% of the weight of dross that is solder * ($1.50/kg of solder - $0.25/kg of dross recycling) = $6.75/day Working days to break-even = Installed cost of the SRS / Daily savings using SRS = $20k/$6.75/day = 2,963 days = 141 months = 11.76 years

Figure this out for yourself, but most finance guys I know would not seriously consider projects with a 11+ year breakeven. Chrys, in an earlier thread on SRSs on SMTnet, calculated a 7 month breakeven. Yours is probably short also and I've just donked the numbers.

>3. Can you recommend a brand name of SRS for this amount?

SRS is marketed by Fancort (201.575.0610 fax 9234) in the US. Apple House in the UK developed and manufactures the "Solder Recovery System" (SRS). Either could give you a lead on your local rep.

>4. I am also thinking of converting to inert atmosphere, what do you think? Am I on the right track?

You bet. A nitrogen blanket on your wave solder machine will reduce dross formation, widen your process window, and allow you to use less aggressive fluxes.

TTYL

Dave F

|1. What is your minimum dross generated that triggers you to procure an SRS? | 2. For a 8 to 10 Kg of dross generated daily, what capacity of SRS capable of recycling these amount of dross without compromising other cost factors? Or I have'nt reached the reqiured volume yet? | 3. Can you recommend a brand name of SRS for this amount? | 4. I am also thinking of converting to inert atmosphere, what do you think? Am I on the right track? | | Please respond, | | Erwin Dorol | Electronic Assemblies Inc, Philippines | Have either one of you seen or used a SRS machine? I had | | | | | | one in for a demo - very impressive. The original model was | | | | | | a little too awkward for production to use, however, the newer | | | | | | model is a little easier to use. The biggest problem that I had with the machine was it's capacity - I think that they expanded the capacity. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ----------------------------------------------------------------- | | | | I have used the SRS system from Fancort. My last company proved it out and we had been using 1 for over 2 years. They bought a second shortly after. I just finished writing an AR to purchase one for my new company. I will be getting the 30lb/bigger model you were reffering to. With a recovery on the average of 75% good reuseable solder, it wasn't hard to justify. In our case it will pay for itself in a little over 8 weeks. Anyone interested should check out Fancort's website @ http://www.fancort.com/products.htm | | | | | | | | Earl & Dave, can't we all just get along? hehe. JKidding | | | | | | | | Jason | | | | | | | See Dave, | | | | | | When the elders begin play, the kids have to but in. | | | | | | Jason, where the hell you been? Where's all your cohorts? Must be the holidays. Besides, I know you're hiding someting. What technical pot are you stiring now? No "Gates" paranoia here. | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | Who's paranoid? | | | | Nothing to hide Earl, I simply answered the man's question without all the proper english and sarcasum. | | | | | | | | | | | |

reply »

Jason

#13389

Re: SRS Systems | 9 December, 1998

Erwin,

I have a question for you. Are there any dross recycling facilities in the Phillippines? How much do they pay per lb/kg? What is your cost of solder? If you recover 75% good solder from your waste, you can easily cut your cost of soldering by a good 40 - 50 %. Dave's right every company calculates capital expenditures differently. What you need to do is see how your financial gurues do this. What I did was present the yearly costs of soldering with recovery verses the yearly cost of solder minus the payback from recycling. I know it's simple but it worked. Also remeber that what's left over as waste from the recovery can still be sold off to the recyclers because their bigger and better machines can still squeeze out more solder. And then their is the waste drum savings but that is minor.

Fancort currently distributes 3 models. The SRS2000 and the drop through model SRS200-6, which are rated for 15lbs or 6kg of dross, and the SRS4000 which is rated for 25-30lbs or up to 18kg of dross. I am sure prices vary but my quotes, in US dollars were $16,500 for the 2000-6 and $23,000 for the 4000. One more thing, Fancort no longer distributes SRS under the name Apple House, the new products name is Earth-Tronics Inc. I don't know if it is the same company or a new manufacturer.

reply »

SMT in-printer dispensing

PCB X-Ray Inspection System