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Too hot to handle

Joe

#12803

Too hot to handle | 25 January, 1999

Greetings,

Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators.

Thank you.

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Earl Moon

#12804

Re: Too hot to handle | 25 January, 1999

| Greetings, | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | Thank you. |

Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow.

Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios.

Cheerio,

Moonman

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Nik

#12805

Re: Too hot to handle | 26 January, 1999

| | Greetings, | | | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | | | Thank you. | | | | Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. | | Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios. | | Cheerio, | | Moonman | How the temerature could be as high as 210-230 C after reflow?? Max temp in owen 250 C approximatly,,and after coolingzones it's under 100 C,,,,cool enough to handel barehanded!!!

///Nik

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Thomas Clift

#12806

Re: Too hot to handle | 26 January, 1999

| | | Greetings, | | | | | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | | | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | | | | | Thank you. | | | | | | | Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. | | | | Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios. | | | | Cheerio, | | | | Moonman | | | How the temerature could be as high as 210-230 C after reflow?? | Max temp in owen 250 C approximatly,,and after coolingzones | it's under 100 C,,,,cool enough to handel barehanded!!! | | ///Nik | The man said "wave", Nik. Not reflow!

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Earl Moon

#12807

Re: Too hot to handle | 27 January, 1999

| | | Greetings, | | | | | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | | | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | | | | | Thank you. | | | | | | | Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. | | | | Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios. | | | | Cheerio, | | | | Moonman | | | How the temerature could be as high as 210-230 C after reflow?? | Max temp in owen 250 C approximatly,,and after coolingzones | it's under 100 C,,,,cool enough to handel barehanded!!! | | ///Nik | Hell Guys,

Can't anyone take a joke? At least I got someone's attention.

Earl Moon

reply »

Charles Stringer

#12808

Re: Too hot to handle | 28 January, 1999

| | | | Greetings, | | | | | | | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | | | | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | | | | | | | Thank you. | | | | | | | | | | Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. | | | | | | Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios. | | | | | | Cheerio, | | | | | | Moonman | | | | | How the temerature could be as high as 210-230 C after reflow?? | | Max temp in owen 250 C approximatly,,and after coolingzones | | it's under 100 C,,,,cool enough to handel barehanded!!! | | | | ///Nik | | | Hell Guys, | | Can't anyone take a joke? At least I got someone's attention. | | Earl Moon | With regard to the comments over vapour being given off, we had a health and safety problem when using a peelable mask on our wave solder machines. Basically the peelable was trapping flux and the boards came out the back end of the wave solderer smoking! (We proved it was a combination of flux and peelable by processing boards with only one element present with no problems.) The odour was truely awful and needless to say we changed our peelable mask

reply »

Earl Moon

#12809

Re: Too hot to handle | 28 January, 1999

| | | | | Greetings, | | | | | | | | | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | | | | | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | | | | | | | | | Thank you. | | | | | | | | | | | | | Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. | | | | | | | | Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios. | | | | | | | | Cheerio, | | | | | | | | Moonman | | | | | | | How the temerature could be as high as 210-230 C after reflow?? | | | Max temp in owen 250 C approximatly,,and after coolingzones | | | it's under 100 C,,,,cool enough to handel barehanded!!! | | | | | | ///Nik | | | | | Hell Guys, | | | | Can't anyone take a joke? At least I got someone's attention. | | | | Earl Moon | | | With regard to the comments over vapour being given off, we had a health and safety problem when using a peelable mask on our wave solder machines. | Basically the peelable was trapping flux and the boards came out the back end of the wave solderer smoking! (We proved it was a combination of flux and peelable by processing boards with only one element present with no problems.) The odour was truely awful and needless to say we changed our peelable mask

In all seriousness, there's some awful stuff in boards and what goes on/in to them. It's a matter of health and welfare to get more of these issues resolved. Like I said before, there are many moves afoot, as you all know, to take the bad and ugly out - hopefully leaving the good. The only problem is, there ain't much good. I really wanted everyone to look at times, temperatures, and chemical compositions concerning all we and our co-workers are exposed to everyday. If we can't remove the stuff, and we cannot, we must protect ourselves using every available means.

Earl Moon |

reply »

Earl Moon

#12810

Re: Too hot to handle | 28 January, 1999

| | | | | Greetings, | | | | | | | | | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | | | | | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | | | | | | | | | Thank you. | | | | | | | | | | | | | Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. | | | | | | | | Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios. | | | | | | | | Cheerio, | | | | | | | | Moonman | | | | | | | How the temerature could be as high as 210-230 C after reflow?? | | | Max temp in owen 250 C approximatly,,and after coolingzones | | | it's under 100 C,,,,cool enough to handel barehanded!!! | | | | | | ///Nik | | | | | Hell Guys, | | | | Can't anyone take a joke? At least I got someone's attention. | | | | Earl Moon | | | With regard to the comments over vapour being given off, we had a health and safety problem when using a peelable mask on our wave solder machines. | Basically the peelable was trapping flux and the boards came out the back end of the wave solderer smoking! (We proved it was a combination of flux and peelable by processing boards with only one element present with no problems.) The odour was truely awful and needless to say we changed our peelable mask

In all seriousness, there's some awful stuff in boards and what goes on/in to them. It's a matter of health and welfare to get more of these issues resolved. Like I said before, there are many moves afoot, as you all know, to take the bad and ugly out - hopefully leaving the good. The only problem is, there ain't much good. I really wanted everyone to look at times, temperatures, and chemical compositions concerning all we and our co-workers are exposed to everyday. If we can't remove the stuff, and we cannot, we must protect ourselves using every available means.

Earl Moon |

reply »

Wayne Bracy

#12811

Re: Too hot to handle | 29 January, 1999

| | | | | | Greetings, | | | | | | | | | | | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | | | | | | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | | | | | | | | | | | Thank you. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. | | | | | | | | | | Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios. | | | | | | | | | | Cheerio, | | | | | | | | | | Moonman | | | | | | | | | How the temerature could be as high as 210-230 C after reflow?? | | | | Max temp in owen 250 C approximatly,,and after coolingzones | | | | it's under 100 C,,,,cool enough to handel barehanded!!! | | | | | | | | ///Nik | | | | | | | Hell Guys, | | | | | | Can't anyone take a joke? At least I got someone's attention. | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | With regard to the comments over vapour being given off, we had a health and safety problem when using a peelable mask on our wave solder machines. | | Basically the peelable was trapping flux and the boards came out the back end of the wave solderer smoking! (We proved it was a combination of flux and peelable by processing boards with only one element present with no problems.) The odour was truely awful and needless to say we changed our peelable mask | | In all seriousness, there's some awful stuff in boards and what goes on/in to them. It's a matter of health and welfare to get more of these issues resolved. Like I said before, there are many moves afoot, as you all know, to take the bad and ugly out - hopefully leaving the good. The only problem is, there ain't much good. I really wanted everyone to look at times, temperatures, and chemical compositions concerning all we and our co-workers are exposed to everyday. If we can't remove the stuff, and we cannot, we must protect ourselves using every available means. | | Earl Moon | |

Earl:

It's a matter of economics! Cost too much to do it right! We have to make sure that every step is taken to protect the people working the assembly line. In the past, Way too often, we would go into facilities and see the workers being placed in harms way and management worried about the bottom line and "End of Month shipments".

Today most companies are taking a close look at process and the dangers and doing something to correct them. Enjoy reading your responses....

Wayne

As for the heat problem most ovens do not offer a long enough cooling zone to bring the processed boards down under 100 degrees C. Some installations have added a brush roller conveyor as a cooling zone buffer. (?)

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Nik

#12812

Re: Too hot to handle | 1 February, 1999

| | | | Greetings, | | | | | | | | Can anyone tell me what temperatures pcb's should have when coming out of a forced convection reflow oven and out of a wavesoldering machine. | | | | Also, is there any danger of the pcb's giving off some kind of gas or vapour which can be harmful in any way to the operators. | | | | | | | | Thank you. | | | | | | | | | | Top side board temperatures immediately out of wave are somewhere between 220 to 240 degrees C. depending on wave temperature (shouldn't vary much from 480 to 500 F.). Top and bottom side, and I guess core (because of the very long soak and liquidous range), temperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. | | | | | | Concerning dangerous vapors, there are many discussions about reducing or eliminating components as halogens and bromines in epoxy resin systems. To what extent they are harmful, is in debate but be sure moves to remove them are being formulated just as is lead and about any other substance known to man. I'm not complaining, but I won't stop using some real sugar on my Wheaties or Cheerios. | | | | | | Cheerio, | | | | | | Moonman | | | | | How the temerature could be as high as 210-230 C after reflow?? | | Max temp in owen 250 C approximatly,,and after coolingzones | | it's under 100 C,,,,cool enough to handel barehanded!!! | | | | ///Nik | | | The man said "wave", Nik. Not reflow! | Yes he did,,BUT!!! if you read the message again you'll understand too, this part maybe?? ................................... emperatures immediately out of reflow's liquidous zones vary according to requirements to effect reflow but range from about 210 to 230 degrees C. The cooling ramp for both is fairly steep though often less so for reflow. .......................................

Or am i wrong?? Nik

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