Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


Selective Wave Solder Palletizing

Earl Moon

#12694

Selective Wave Solder Palletizing | 4 February, 1999

I realize it's been discussed many times before. I need to know your opinions, experience, and knowledge concerning "today's"/latest and best pallet designs, suppliers, and methods for using them more effectively.

Thanks much,

Earl Moon

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Ryan Jennens

#12695

Re: Selective Wave Solder Palletizing | 4 February, 1999

| I realize it's been discussed many times before. I need to know your opinions, experience, and knowledge concerning "today's"/latest and best pallet designs, suppliers, and methods for using them more effectively. | | Thanks much, | | Earl Moon | Hey there Earl!

We use selective soldering pallets extensively. This allows us to reflow bottom-side components and eliminate any problems which are associated with waving said components. This also protects tantulum caps from thermal shock and keeps the boards flat and level regardless of original board condition. The pallet place makes them out of ESD material, so that helps in that arena. The cost is not very high, considering the reduced rework and gaurantee of level boards and no flooding.

Ryan Jennens TelGen Corporation formerly Phoenix Engineering Design, Inc.

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Chad Haim

#12696

Re: Selective Wave Solder Palletizing | 5 February, 1999

| I realize it's been discussed many times before. I need to know your opinions, experience, and knowledge concerning "today's"/latest and best pallet designs, suppliers, and methods for using them more effectively. | | Thanks much, | | Earl Moon | I know there's no advertising, but our website www.spprecision.com will give lots of useful information concerning selective solder pallets.

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chris arnold

#12697

Re: Selective Wave Solder Palletizing | 8 February, 1999

| I realize it's been discussed many times before. I need to know your opinions, experience, and knowledge concerning "today's"/latest and best pallet designs, suppliers, and methods for using them more effectively.

Earl,

Pallets can be extremely useful in reducing soldering defects at the wave operation. This in turn increases first pass yield and reduces the amount of materials sent to repair. Pallets fully support the pcb and can eliminate or reduce tape and liquid mask usage and their related defects. A pallet will also act as a solder dam, allowing you to increase wave height without flooding the card.

Please keep in mind that a pallet can address many design/manufacturing issues; but custom pallets and their effectiveness can be design/layout dependent. This is especially true with high density cards.

Regarding materials: I have had the most experience w/ delamt and have received good perfromance from it. It has been in the market since the '90 or '91. Others have come along since then; glastic, attwater, roechling, durastone, and G-10. G-10 is acceptable only in proto or low run work since the material absorbs water and breaks down due to the heating cycles in the wave. cost wise the newer materials run any where from 2-5 times the cost of G-10. The cost difference is well worth the expense because the material life is significantly better.

Please feel free to contact me at 877-383-8665 if you have any other questions.

Chris

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Jim Gleason

#12698

Re: Selective Wave Solder Palletizing | 9 February, 1999

Earl, We have found that many people get closer to a zero defect program using pallets. Since you eliminate manula masking you eliminate on huge area of possible defects production. Since the pallets can align connectors etc, you get less defects due to components shifting over the wave. Masking of underside componets also cuts their temperature in half over the wave and keeps their original solder joints intact.An added benifit is that you can engrave instructin on the pallet i.e run this direction in wave. With the long life materials we use today the cost per PCb run is incredibly small. We have found that the PCB board design changes before the pallets wear out.

In the SMT area the flush mount hold down allow you to run the PCB on the pallet all the way throuhg you SMT line. This allos the PCB to be better supported over the stencil and you get better registration and longer squeege life. Handling defects are greatly reduced also.

Needless to say there are very good cost saving due to reduction on manual labor, reduced defects etc. Feel free to give me a buzz if you would like more info.

Jim 972-494-1911| I realize it's been discussed many times before. I need to know your opinions, experience, and knowledge concerning "today's"/latest and best pallet designs, suppliers, and methods for using them more effectively. | | Thanks much, | | Earl Moon |

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