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Earl Moon

#11251

Things I Like Without Endorsing | 2 June, 1999

To you all for comment and summary,

The following things I like without endorsing (PCB/PCBA stuff - outside the great women in my life [many] and without [mostly]):

1) A good set of design rules 2) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements 3) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements implemented/used by concurrent engineering people from concept to customer acceptance. 4) A good master and assembly drawing with clearly defined acceptance specifications 5) PCB's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (MLB constructions, plating, surface coatings, hole sizes, electrical parameters, solder masks, cleanliness, etc.) 6) PCBA's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (solderable surfaces, traces not open to pads, no vias in pads, device and pad relationships met, cured solder masks, cleanliness) 7) Processes capable of producing acceptable PCB/PCBA,s (well defined, carefully evaluated/qualified, properly implemented, clearly written/provided procedures, well trained/responsible operators and engineers/personnel, statistical evidence of high quality, efficiency, and effectiveness) 8) Good tools and equipment (soldering irons [Metcal], rework equipment [Pace, SRT, Conceptronic), printing equipment (DEK and MPM), placement equipment (Philips, Panasonic, Mydata), reflow and wave soldering (BTU, Conceptronic, Vitronics, Electrovert) 9) Great, well trained operators and engineers (did I mention this?) because management was smart enough to relaize they drive Mercedes because of them without proper reward or kind comments (this one's for you Steve, and the rest of us wanting mostly to do it right the first time) 10) Post processing/inspection (way too much confusion here as X-Ray, electrical testing, visual, etc.)

Anyway, I was just putting together a "Top Ten" wish list comprised of my most recent (last 5 years) favorite stuff. Anyone else care to expand, comment, or not?

Moonman

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JohnW

#11252

Re: Things I Like Without Endorsing | 2 June, 1999

| To you all for comment and summary, | | The following things I like without endorsing (PCB/PCBA stuff - outside the great women in my life [many] and without [mostly]): | | 1) A good set of design rules | 2) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements | 3) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements implemented/used by concurrent engineering people from concept to customer acceptance. | 4) A good master and assembly drawing with clearly defined acceptance specifications | 5) PCB's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (MLB constructions, plating, surface coatings, hole sizes, electrical parameters, solder masks, cleanliness, etc.) | 6) PCBA's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (solderable surfaces, traces not open to pads, no vias in pads, device and pad relationships met, cured solder masks, cleanliness) | 7) Processes capable of producing acceptable PCB/PCBA,s (well defined, carefully evaluated/qualified, properly implemented, clearly written/provided procedures, well trained/responsible operators and engineers/personnel, statistical evidence of high quality, efficiency, and effectiveness) | 8) Good tools and equipment (soldering irons [Metcal], rework equipment [Pace, SRT, Conceptronic), printing equipment (DEK and MPM), placement equipment (Philips, Panasonic, Mydata), reflow and wave soldering (BTU, Conceptronic, Vitronics, Electrovert) | 9) Great, well trained operators and engineers (did I mention this?) because management was smart enough to relaize they drive Mercedes because of them without proper reward or kind comments (this one's for you Steve, and the rest of us wanting mostly to do it right the first time) | 10) Post processing/inspection (way too much confusion here as X-Ray, electrical testing, visual, etc.) | | Anyway, I was just putting together a "Top Ten" wish list comprised of my most recent (last 5 years) favorite stuff. Anyone else care to expand, comment, or not? | | Moonman | Moonman,

I love ya man!, I printed this off, dropped it on one of our 'senior' bosses desk with the imortal words...SEE IT AINT JUST ME!!!! ( anyone looking to hire a good process engineer by the way!)

Anyway's here are a few of my favorite thing's...

1. Alll the above ( ok it's a cop out) 2. A customer that listen's to what you tell them and put it into design's like leaving a dam gap round the edge of the board to use a placement machine!!! 3. Customers that have all the documentation and gerber / cad data , just cos I like an easy life. Can do a good job quicker if I got good information. 4. Buyer's that dont buy material loose!, I mean how do they think we're gonna fit it in the machines??? 5. Vendors that work with you and deliver on time. 6. Bosses that listen to you...I have to say that my immediate boss is the best 1 I've had ( and it's not incase he's reading this)he actualy listens, thinks, then give's u his opinon but suport's u to do a good job..bet your all jealous. 7. Board manufacturers that can hold a tolerance and not supply warped boards. 8. A good operator Traning department that actually know what they're talking about outwith soldering irons. 9. Half day Fridays!!! 10. Women in short skirt's on the shop floor or office...but hey that might just be me....I doubt it tho'

That's my top 10 for this week what do you think then...???

JohnW

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Dean

#11253

Re: Things I Like Without Endorsing | 2 June, 1999

| To you all for comment and summary, | | The following things I like without endorsing (PCB/PCBA stuff - outside the great women in my life [many] and without [mostly]): | | 1) A good set of design rules | 2) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements | 3) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements implemented/used by concurrent engineering people from concept to customer acceptance. | 4) A good master and assembly drawing with clearly defined acceptance specifications | 5) PCB's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (MLB constructions, plating, surface coatings, hole sizes, electrical parameters, solder masks, cleanliness, etc.) | 6) PCBA's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (solderable surfaces, traces not open to pads, no vias in pads, device and pad relationships met, cured solder masks, cleanliness) | 7) Processes capable of producing acceptable PCB/PCBA,s (well defined, carefully evaluated/qualified, properly implemented, clearly written/provided procedures, well trained/responsible operators and engineers/personnel, statistical evidence of high quality, efficiency, and effectiveness) | 8) Good tools and equipment (soldering irons [Metcal], rework equipment [Pace, SRT, Conceptronic), printing equipment (DEK and MPM), placement equipment (Philips, Panasonic, Mydata), reflow and wave soldering (BTU, Conceptronic, Vitronics, Electrovert) | 9) Great, well trained operators and engineers (did I mention this?) because management was smart enough to relaize they drive Mercedes because of them without proper reward or kind comments (this one's for you Steve, and the rest of us wanting mostly to do it right the first time) | 10) Post processing/inspection (way too much confusion here as X-Ray, electrical testing, visual, etc.) | | Anyway, I was just putting together a "Top Ten" wish list comprised of my most recent (last 5 years) favorite stuff. Anyone else care to expand, comment, or not? | | Moonman | Wow, Earl! You don't ask for much. Do you? addendum...Things I too like. * Quote evaluations which are accurate and do not exceed present capability. Oh yeah and make money, too! * The 70 hour work week is NOT the standard, but the exception. * Tape AND reel means there must be a reel and not 4 inches of exact count parts!!! * The term "flip-chip" does not include placing soic parts upside-down! * Robust repeatable processes followed exactly by operator staff (or else). * SMT machines that have no surfaces which could be mistaken for cup holders. (12 ounces of coffee goes a long ways in an MPM 3000!!!) * SMT machines with fake controll panels so the operators can tweek knobs and gauges without actually affecting the current process. * Component designers which actually design packages to be COMPATABLE with P&P machines. * Good raises and an occasional bonus! Life is good, friends. This is the "busy season". New equipment arives, weekly and I don't get many breaks. Catch you on the flip-side! Dean

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Earl Moon

#11254

Re: Things I Like Without Endorsing | 3 June, 1999

| | To you all for comment and summary, | | | | The following things I like without endorsing (PCB/PCBA stuff - outside the great women in my life [many] and without [mostly]): | | | | 1) A good set of design rules | | 2) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements | | 3) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements implemented/used by concurrent engineering people from concept to customer acceptance. | | 4) A good master and assembly drawing with clearly defined acceptance specifications | | 5) PCB's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (MLB constructions, plating, surface coatings, hole sizes, electrical parameters, solder masks, cleanliness, etc.) | | 6) PCBA's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (solderable surfaces, traces not open to pads, no vias in pads, device and pad relationships met, cured solder masks, cleanliness) | | 7) Processes capable of producing acceptable PCB/PCBA,s (well defined, carefully evaluated/qualified, properly implemented, clearly written/provided procedures, well trained/responsible operators and engineers/personnel, statistical evidence of high quality, efficiency, and effectiveness) | | 8) Good tools and equipment (soldering irons [Metcal], rework equipment [Pace, SRT, Conceptronic), printing equipment (DEK and MPM), placement equipment (Philips, Panasonic, Mydata), reflow and wave soldering (BTU, Conceptronic, Vitronics, Electrovert) | | 9) Great, well trained operators and engineers (did I mention this?) because management was smart enough to relaize they drive Mercedes because of them without proper reward or kind comments (this one's for you Steve, and the rest of us wanting mostly to do it right the first time) | | 10) Post processing/inspection (way too much confusion here as X-Ray, electrical testing, visual, etc.) | | | | Anyway, I was just putting together a "Top Ten" wish list comprised of my most recent (last 5 years) favorite stuff. Anyone else care to expand, comment, or not? | | | | Moonman | | | Wow, Earl! You don't ask for much. Do you? | addendum...Things I too like. | * Quote evaluations which are accurate and do not exceed present capability. Oh yeah and make money, too! | * The 70 hour work week is NOT the standard, but the exception. | * Tape AND reel means there must be a reel and not 4 inches of exact count parts!!! | * The term "flip-chip" does not include placing soic parts upside-down! | * Robust repeatable processes followed exactly by operator staff (or else). | * SMT machines that have no surfaces which could be mistaken for cup holders. (12 ounces of coffee goes a long ways in an MPM 3000!!!) | * SMT machines with fake controll panels so the operators can tweek knobs and gauges without actually affecting the current process. | * Component designers which actually design packages to be COMPATABLE with P&P machines. | * Good raises and an occasional bonus! | Life is good, friends. This is the "busy season". New equipment arives, weekly and I don't get many breaks. Catch you on the flip-side! | Dean | | Outstanding Dean. Exactly the kind of response for which I hoped. Let me add some stuff to your stuff so I can more clearly present my very idealistic view of how "it" should be done instead of the way many "managers" in this business now do it.

1) Quote evaluations in my world would be prepared using concurrent engineering evaluations to ensure designs producible within proven process capabilities, to make money too, or designs or processes or both would be modified to do so. This is the biggest problem I face in industry today as the cognizant, responsible "experts" don't get together, from design through test, to provide input as to what can be done, with what, to get the job done, or not.

2) As a contract/consultant type, I love 60/70 hour weeks because of the overtime, but it can be a bit much I agree, no matter the money. Give me more while I can still do it, but the "normal" case is too excessive with people stretched to limits while they and product quality suffers - all in the name of demand/cycle time improvement.

3) Man did you hit it with tape and reel and exact count parts that are never enough as line stoppages because - where's the parts for this job and why are we doing this to our Fuji's. They/we deserve better.

4) Upside down! Did you say upside down? We had one 6 month veteran/expert operator who didn't need no stinking pre-process audit check list to do her job. She is the only person I've ever known with this incredible attitude that ran a complete lot of double sided assemblies all the way through the oven UPSIDE DOWN. This goes beyond flip chip. How about that new flip board technology?

5) In my current job, we have some of the best operators around. "Management" let them alone, about two years ago, to "own" and "manage" their own processes. It worked well for awhile until management got lazy and let them alone for good. Now I'm struggling to re-institute training and the ability to provide "direction," instead of kind and gentle guidance, so these folks are first responsible again, then accountable or? Of course, after adequate training with real procedures (one procedure now has the operator loading programs and editing part files before even turning on the machine) that actually reflect what must be done by whom, when, where, how, and why. As far a as process robustness, most of my machines are that and repeatable. It's too often what goes in, by whom, that comes out crap.

6) There ain't now damn food or drink allowed in any manufacturing area...

7) Training, training, training, and performance evaluations with real time feedback with number nine plus appreciation attached. On second thought, and third, screw appreciation - give me the raises.

8) Component, and all other designers, included in the DFM/CE process. What a concept!

9) I do love them raises. I really love raises - even more than watching my bosses drive their $80,000 Mercedes before I get my beloved raises. Bonuses? They actually happen? Damn, can't wait to see one in my lifetime.

10) I know, Dean, you don't minde being busy. It's much better than not being. However, I also know you mean being busy doing it right the first time - not doing it over.

Thanks Deanman,

Moonman

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Dean

#11255

Re: Things I Like Without Endorsing | 5 June, 1999

| | | To you all for comment and summary, | | | | | | The following things I like without endorsing (PCB/PCBA stuff - outside the great women in my life [many] and without [mostly]): | | | | | | 1) A good set of design rules | | | 2) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements | | | 3) A good set of design rules meeting producibility requirements implemented/used by concurrent engineering people from concept to customer acceptance. | | | 4) A good master and assembly drawing with clearly defined acceptance specifications | | | 5) PCB's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (MLB constructions, plating, surface coatings, hole sizes, electrical parameters, solder masks, cleanliness, etc.) | | | 6) PCBA's meeting acceptance and producibility requirements (solderable surfaces, traces not open to pads, no vias in pads, device and pad relationships met, cured solder masks, cleanliness) | | | 7) Processes capable of producing acceptable PCB/PCBA,s (well defined, carefully evaluated/qualified, properly implemented, clearly written/provided procedures, well trained/responsible operators and engineers/personnel, statistical evidence of high quality, efficiency, and effectiveness) | | | 8) Good tools and equipment (soldering irons [Metcal], rework equipment [Pace, SRT, Conceptronic), printing equipment (DEK and MPM), placement equipment (Philips, Panasonic, Mydata), reflow and wave soldering (BTU, Conceptronic, Vitronics, Electrovert) | | | 9) Great, well trained operators and engineers (did I mention this?) because management was smart enough to relaize they drive Mercedes because of them without proper reward or kind comments (this one's for you Steve, and the rest of us wanting mostly to do it right the first time) | | | 10) Post processing/inspection (way too much confusion here as X-Ray, electrical testing, visual, etc.) | | | | | | Anyway, I was just putting together a "Top Ten" wish list comprised of my most recent (last 5 years) favorite stuff. Anyone else care to expand, comment, or not? | | | | | | Moonman | | | | | Wow, Earl! You don't ask for much. Do you? | | addendum...Things I too like. | | * Quote evaluations which are accurate and do not exceed present capability. Oh yeah and make money, too! | | * The 70 hour work week is NOT the standard, but the exception. | | * Tape AND reel means there must be a reel and not 4 inches of exact count parts!!! | | * The term "flip-chip" does not include placing soic parts upside-down! | | * Robust repeatable processes followed exactly by operator staff (or else). | | * SMT machines that have no surfaces which could be mistaken for cup holders. (12 ounces of coffee goes a long ways in an MPM 3000!!!) | | * SMT machines with fake controll panels so the operators can tweek knobs and gauges without actually affecting the current process. | | * Component designers which actually design packages to be COMPATABLE with P&P machines. | | * Good raises and an occasional bonus! | | Life is good, friends. This is the "busy season". New equipment arives, weekly and I don't get many breaks. Catch you on the flip-side! | | Dean | | | | | Outstanding Dean. Exactly the kind of response for which I hoped. Let me add some stuff to your stuff so I can more clearly present my very idealistic view of how "it" should be done instead of the way many "managers" in this business now do it. | | 1) Quote evaluations in my world would be prepared using concurrent engineering evaluations to ensure designs producible within proven process capabilities, to make money too, or designs or processes or both would be modified to do so. This is the biggest problem I face in industry today as the cognizant, responsible "experts" don't get together, from design through test, to provide input as to what can be done, with what, to get the job done, or not. | | 2) As a contract/consultant type, I love 60/70 hour weeks because of the overtime, but it can be a bit much I agree, no matter the money. Give me more while I can still do it, but the "normal" case is too excessive with people stretched to limits while they and product quality suffers - all in the name of demand/cycle time improvement. | | 3) Man did you hit it with tape and reel and exact count parts that are never enough as line stoppages because - where's the parts for this job and why are we doing this to our Fuji's. They/we deserve better. | | 4) Upside down! Did you say upside down? We had one 6 month veteran/expert operator who didn't need no stinking pre-process audit check list to do her job. She is the only person I've ever known with this incredible attitude that ran a complete lot of double sided assemblies all the way through the oven UPSIDE DOWN. This goes beyond flip chip. How about that new flip board technology? | | 5) In my current job, we have some of the best operators around. "Management" let them alone, about two years ago, to "own" and "manage" their own processes. It worked well for awhile until management got lazy and let them alone for good. Now I'm struggling to re-institute training and the ability to provide "direction," instead of kind and gentle guidance, so these folks are first responsible again, then accountable or? Of course, after adequate training with real procedures (one procedure now has the operator loading programs and editing part files before even turning on the machine) that actually reflect what must be done by whom, when, where, how, and why. As far a as process robustness, most of my machines are that and repeatable. It's too often what goes in, by whom, that comes out crap. | | 6) There ain't now damn food or drink allowed in any manufacturing area... | | 7) Training, training, training, and performance evaluations with real time feedback with number nine plus appreciation attached. On second thought, and third, screw appreciation - give me the raises. | | 8) Component, and all other designers, included in the DFM/CE process. What a concept! | | 9) I do love them raises. I really love raises - even more than watching my bosses drive their $80,000 Mercedes before I get my beloved raises. Bonuses? They actually happen? Damn, can't wait to see one in my lifetime. | | 10) I know, Dean, you don't minde being busy. It's much better than not being. However, I also know you mean being busy doing it right the first time - not doing it over. | | Thanks Deanman, | | Moonman | | I am very fortunate as a process technician to be responsible and accountable for the work I do. Pride in ownership is rare. I am fortunate to work with some of the best equipment available. I used to believe in the formula: quality inputs yields quality outputs. Unfortunately, I forgot to factor in the "human element". The quality of my training of the operator staff and technical staff is evident everyday and reflects directly on me. If they fail, I fail. Its that simple. I learned recently that merit and pay are mutually exclusive (and inversely proportional). The bean counters rule the books and we (the opressed) are powerless (and ungrateful for the 2 bits). I agree, Earl, a pat on the back goes a long way. BUT I CAN'T REMEMBER THE LAST TIME A PAT-ON-THE-BACK PAID MY RENT! Well, there is my bad-attitude showing, again. I remember, a while ago, I developed a process to remove epoxy from heat-sinks on BGA memories. With 8 hours of work I allowed the customer to ship 3,000,000 dollars worth of product to France. All I got out of the deal was a polo shirt. (those silicon-vally big shots just push us around). Oh well, no need going critical mass again. Cheers, my friend. Dean He who owns the gold...rules.

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