Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


Big K

#10771

product changeovers | 1 July, 1999

I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome.

Big K

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Scott

#10772

Re: product changeovers | 2 July, 1999

| I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | Big K | I've used separate feeder staging areas with great success, a >50% reduction in time. One draw back, the availability of feeders... You need 280 feeders max to change over a max capacity of 140 feeder machine (or a variance of a product mix vs. part numbers); then there's 8mm, 12mm, 16mm, sticks feeders that complicate the issue. I've also isolated the staging area from the assembly area to reduce "interaction". Good start with your plan.

reply »

Earl Moon

#10773

Re: product changeovers | 2 July, 1999

| | I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | | | Big K | | | I've used separate feeder staging areas with great success, a >50% reduction in time. One draw back, the availability of feeders... You need 280 feeders max to change over a max capacity of 140 feeder machine (or a variance of a product mix vs. part numbers); then there's 8mm, 12mm, 16mm, sticks feeders that complicate the issue. I've also isolated the staging area from the assembly area to reduce "interaction". Good start with your plan. | Bik K,

Great name - outstanding. Scott's got it right. Short of getting rid of machines not designed to do your/our high mix, low volume, get many more feeders.

We have feeders literally coming out of the walls as vertical carousels (how do you spell that damn word anyway?). We have outside tape and reel programmer/loaders as well as those internal. It just doesn't end. However, we run as many as 50 new protos a month and our production cycle times, for about 15 new setups per line/day, is 4 days or less shooting for over 20 million placements per month soon. This encompasses over 1500 assembly numbers in current or past production.

We now have completed setting up our six Fuji CP and IP lines to do as you are. I cannot even imagine what we've had to do to make these machines perform outside their world of turn on and forget but to reload.

Fortunately, we now are getting more help from our new Mydata machines. This only is because we have some extra large panels that won't run on anything else. Maybe, they'll take over all production.

Enjoy,

Earl Moon

reply »

#10774

Re: product changeovers | 2 July, 1999

| I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | Big K | I'm not trying to be flip, I'm trying to understand. This is the second Fuji conversation like this in the past month, not that I'm compaining, it's fascinating!!!

Do people using Fuji's in a high mix-low volume factory:

1 Buy Fuji's because they expect their volume to to expand to match-up their machines? 2 Have Fuji's and change their manufacturing lot size philospophy from high volume low volume? 3 Have a boss that got "such a deal" on the machines he snapped? 4 Er what?

Thanks for your patience.

Dave F

reply »

Earl Moon

#10775

Re: product changeovers | 2 July, 1999

| | I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | | | Big K | | | I'm not trying to be flip, I'm trying to understand. This is the second Fuji conversation like this in the past month, not that I'm compaining, it's fascinating!!! | | Do people using Fuji's in a high mix-low volume factory: | | 1 Buy Fuji's because they expect their volume to to expand to match-up their machines? | 2 Have Fuji's and change their manufacturing lot size philospophy from high volume low volume? | 3 Have a boss that got "such a deal" on the machines he snapped? | 4 Er what? | | Thanks for your patience. | | Dave F | Well shit Dave,

All the above, but why so suprising to one as experienced as you in perfection? Hell, maybe things just changed overnight, or the machines just slowed down to suit low volume needs.

reply »

Scotty

#10776

Re: product changeovers | 2 July, 1999

| | I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | | | Big K | | | I'm not trying to be flip, I'm trying to understand. This is the second Fuji conversation like this in the past month, not that I'm compaining, it's fascinating!!! | | Do people using Fuji's in a high mix-low volume factory: | | 1 Buy Fuji's because they expect their volume to to expand to match-up their machines? | 2 Have Fuji's and change their manufacturing lot size philospophy from high volume low volume? | 3 Have a boss that got "such a deal" on the machines he snapped? | 4 Er what? | | Thanks for your patience. | | Dave F |

Dave F

I also use Fuji CP's & IP's in a high-mix low volume(50-300 lot runs) shop. Best decision we ever made, they are very suited for this type of mfg. I can give you several reasons why but I would sound like a sales person. The speed and accuracy is well known but there are more benefits than that to a small house.

Big K

If you have any programs that use common parts you might try using the optimizer, to keep the common parts at the same feeder slot thereby reducing the amount of changeover.

Scotty

reply »

DEAN

#10777

Re: product changeovers | 3 July, 1999

| | I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | | | Big K | | | I'm not trying to be flip, I'm trying to understand. This is the second Fuji conversation like this in the past month, not that I'm compaining, it's fascinating!!! | | Do people using Fuji's in a high mix-low volume factory: | | 1 Buy Fuji's because they expect their volume to to expand to match-up their machines? | 2 Have Fuji's and change their manufacturing lot size philospophy from high volume low volume? | 3 Have a boss that got "such a deal" on the machines he snapped? | 4 Er what? | | Thanks for your patience. | | Dave F | Here is an idea I used a couple of years ago on CP4.3 machines. Product 1 used 120 feeder locations. Product 2 used 100 feeder locations. This requires "joint" table mode. Fuji optimizers assign the highest user, fastest transport parts to slot 1 ascending to 160 (slowest transport ). For a changeover in this fashion requires removing at least 100 feeder locations of product 1 (remaining 20 can sit on table unused). What I devised was running a normal optimized program (slot 1 to 120) for product 1. However, on product 2, I optimized in reverse from slot 160 to 60 . Therefore, the changeover time was reduced to the difference of product 1 minus product 2 (or 20 feeder locations)! These two products accounted for around 1.7 million placements per week. Changeover time went from 30 minutes to 5 minutes! Also, I ran changeover mode which can make a difference on large feeder setups rather than waiting for the Device table to return to feeder 1, it prelodes the turret from the last ending point (reverse picking). If you have IP machines, buy extra device carts for fast feeder swap-outs. To answer a question above, it is wise to expand into your equipment as long as your equipment corelates to your existing or planed business model. Fuji has a reputation of robustness and performance. As they have saturated the high volume market place and the "crank 'em out " what ever the cost attitude is fading to, "cost per placement does matter" , it seems too late as the low-medium markets are fast filling up with a plethera of machine vendors well suited to medium volume. I am fortunate to work in a CM which provides business services in high volume to low volume cost sensitive markets and as a result of that I work with a wide array of equipment. If it wasn't for creative folks like us SMT netters, Fuji's wouln't of had a chance to perform in low-mid volume shops. Coinsequently, often times we must work with equipment not necessarily best suited for the application, but with planning creative genius technical leadership and American know-how it is possible create a proffitable environment. Complain as much as you want, but the ship date still stands. Make it work or your customer may come to my shop! Dean

reply »

JohnW

#10778

Re: product changeovers | 3 July, 1999

| | | I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | | | | | Big K | | | | | I've used separate feeder staging areas with great success, a >50% reduction in time. One draw back, the availability of feeders... You need 280 feeders max to change over a max capacity of 140 feeder machine (or a variance of a product mix vs. part numbers); then there's 8mm, 12mm, 16mm, sticks feeders that complicate the issue. I've also isolated the staging area from the assembly area to reduce "interaction". Good start with your plan. | | | Bik K, | | Great name - outstanding. Scott's got it right. Short of getting rid of machines not designed to do your/our high mix, low volume, get many more feeders. | | We have feeders literally coming out of the walls as vertical carousels (how do you spell that damn word anyway?). We have outside tape and reel programmer/loaders as well as those internal. It just doesn't end. However, we run as many as 50 new protos a month and our production cycle times, for about 15 new setups per line/day, is 4 days or less shooting for over 20 million placements per month soon. This encompasses over 1500 assembly numbers in current or past production. | | We now have completed setting up our six Fuji CP and IP lines to do as you are. I cannot even imagine what we've had to do to make these machines perform outside their world of turn on and forget but to reload. | | Fortunately, we now are getting more help from our new Mydata machines. This only is because we have some extra large panels that won't run on anything else. Maybe, they'll take over all production. | | Enjoy, | | Earl Moon | My place run Fuji IP3's and Cp6's as a general rule in the low and meduim volume and change over isn't quick in thegranmd scale normally about 30 mins ago but our guy's in the SMD programming team are doing a superb job with common material and program's to cut down change overs. The problems strt to hit as you go to the double tables tho , I like the idea or optimising the second program from 160 down, but doesn't this reduce the flexibility of the line ? we run any board down any line when ever we need to so have complete flexibility. The problem with feeding up an IP on a spare device trolly is that you have to push the dam thing into place..out IP's are on base pad's which add probably 3 inches to the height..don't ask the reason cos I don't know..never felt the urge to ask...but trying to push one of those IP trollies into place is a recipe for a bad back!. I guess the best machine I've seen for off line kitting is the Europlacer stuff but it's not great for real volumes. In term's of optimisation Fuji just isn't too go at it..that's why they're subing the next generation of programming out..we're looking at 'other' optimiser's that really wo9rk and give result's of usually 30% up on a fuji Volumes is a different matter tho'..do you go for the turret or do you go for multiple heads ?? We went for in the main Panasert's for hi volumne but change over is minimal and they are great at churning out board after board, changeover time thou is around 45 mins with the mongolian hoard aproach..many hand's and all that. Basically the optimisation side of stuff is each to their own I guess but what we have found is by identifying what product's use the same material you can optimise the schedule rather than the program's on their own to reduce the changes so your 1st change maybe 60% of the feed in about 30 mins but changes 2,3,4 may be 5 - 10% and take only 5 mins so it average's out over the day. That's great for calculating efective placement rates and machine utilisations..but it also help's stores with kitting and done right can cut the number of feeder's your haveing to tie your precious pound's or dollars up in!

just my ramblins tho

JohnW

reply »

Earl Moon

#10779

Re: product changeovers | 3 July, 1999

| | | | I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | | | | | | | Big K | | | | | | | I've used separate feeder staging areas with great success, a >50% reduction in time. One draw back, the availability of feeders... You need 280 feeders max to change over a max capacity of 140 feeder machine (or a variance of a product mix vs. part numbers); then there's 8mm, 12mm, 16mm, sticks feeders that complicate the issue. I've also isolated the staging area from the assembly area to reduce "interaction". Good start with your plan. | | | | | Bik K, | | | | Great name - outstanding. Scott's got it right. Short of getting rid of machines not designed to do your/our high mix, low volume, get many more feeders. | | | | We have feeders literally coming out of the walls as vertical carousels (how do you spell that damn word anyway?). We have outside tape and reel programmer/loaders as well as those internal. It just doesn't end. However, we run as many as 50 new protos a month and our production cycle times, for about 15 new setups per line/day, is 4 days or less shooting for over 20 million placements per month soon. This encompasses over 1500 assembly numbers in current or past production. | | | | We now have completed setting up our six Fuji CP and IP lines to do as you are. I cannot even imagine what we've had to do to make these machines perform outside their world of turn on and forget but to reload. | | | | Fortunately, we now are getting more help from our new Mydata machines. This only is because we have some extra large panels that won't run on anything else. Maybe, they'll take over all production. | | | | Enjoy, | | | | Earl Moon | | | My place run Fuji IP3's and Cp6's as a general rule in the low and meduim volume and change over isn't quick in thegranmd scale normally about 30 mins ago but our guy's in the SMD programming team are doing a superb job with common material and program's to cut down change overs. The problems strt to hit as you go to the double tables tho , I like the idea or optimising the second program from 160 down, but doesn't this reduce the flexibility of the line ? we run any board down any line when ever we need to so have complete flexibility. | The problem with feeding up an IP on a spare device trolly is that you have to push the dam thing into place..out IP's are on base pad's which add probably 3 inches to the height..don't ask the reason cos I don't know..never felt the urge to ask...but trying to push one of those IP trollies into place is a recipe for a bad back!. I guess the best machine I've seen for off line kitting is the Europlacer stuff but it's not great for real volumes. | In term's of optimisation Fuji just isn't too go at it..that's why they're subing the next generation of programming out..we're looking at 'other' optimiser's that really wo9rk and give result's of usually 30% up on a fuji | Volumes is a different matter tho'..do you go for the turret or do you go for multiple heads ?? | We went for in the main Panasert's for hi volumne but change over is minimal and they are great at churning out board after board, changeover time thou is around 45 mins with the mongolian hoard aproach..many hand's and all that. | Basically the optimisation side of stuff is each to their own I guess but what we have found is by identifying what product's use the same material you can optimise the schedule rather than the program's on their own to reduce the changes so your 1st change maybe 60% of the feed in about 30 mins but changes 2,3,4 may be 5 - 10% and take only 5 mins so it average's out over the day. | That's great for calculating efective placement rates and machine utilisations..but it also help's stores with kitting and done right can cut the number of feeder's your haveing to tie your precious pound's or dollars up in! | | just my ramblins tho | | JohnW | John,

You said a bunch. My biggest problem running Fuji, Panasonic, or Sanyo high speed stuff is that they are meant to run free. They are meant, in my mind, to run as thoroughbreds.

I watch 6" reels placed on feeders, placed on the carts you describe being roled into position only to be consumed within seconds. Then, another cart is roled in and on it goes.

I just prefer equipment designed for particular needs. I never discount high speed, but use it where needed. I prefer flexibility. Just like PCB design and fabrication, assembly requirements are met through concurrence and the ability to maximize efficiency and effectiveness.

I guess, if I had my say, I would like to have one or two super high speed lines and another line or two dedicated to high mix, low volume, plus spare machines and the ability to roll one in to mix with another line. We never get that for which we wish, but it doesn't stop us. Also, when is FujiCam and UniCam really going to fulfill its destiny?

Earl Moon

reply »

Scott Cook

#10780

Re: product changeovers | 3 July, 1999

| John, | | You said a bunch. My biggest problem running Fuji, Panasonic, or Sanyo high speed stuff is that they are meant to run free. They are meant, in my mind, to run as thoroughbreds. | | I watch 6" reels placed on feeders, placed on the carts you describe being roled into position only to be consumed within seconds. Then, another cart is roled in and on it goes. | | I just prefer equipment designed for particular needs. I never discount high speed, but use it where needed. I prefer flexibility. Just like PCB design and fabrication, assembly requirements are met through concurrence and the ability to maximize efficiency and effectiveness. | | I guess, if I had my say, I would like to have one or two super high speed lines and another line or two dedicated to high mix, low volume, plus spare machines and the ability to roll one in to mix with another line. We never get that for which we wish, but it doesn't stop us. Also, when is FujiCam and UniCam really going to fulfill its destiny? | | Earl Moon |

Earl,

Once again, you give us pearls of wisdom.

In answer to your rhetorical question:

Soon, VERY SOON. Get on the train; it's about to go 80 miles an hour! The merger brings very good things.......

Scott Cook scook@smtnet.com

reply »

JohnW

#10781

Re: product changeovers | 3 July, 1999

| | | | | I am currently looking into ways to decrease SMT changeover times. I work in a high mix-low volume factory. We use Fuji CP's and IP's for SMT production. I would appreciate hearing from anybody that has some proven methods for reducing setup/changeover times. Due to a large variety of components on these modules, we cannot use the split table mode on the CP's. I am thinking along the lines of a separate feeder staging area. Any comments or suggestions are welcome. | | | | | | | | | | Big K | | | | | | | | | I've used separate feeder staging areas with great success, a >50% reduction in time. One draw back, the availability of feeders... You need 280 feeders max to change over a max capacity of 140 feeder machine (or a variance of a product mix vs. part numbers); then there's 8mm, 12mm, 16mm, sticks feeders that complicate the issue. I've also isolated the staging area from the assembly area to reduce "interaction". Good start with your plan. | | | | | | | Bik K, | | | | | | Great name - outstanding. Scott's got it right. Short of getting rid of machines not designed to do your/our high mix, low volume, get many more feeders. | | | | | | We have feeders literally coming out of the walls as vertical carousels (how do you spell that damn word anyway?). We have outside tape and reel programmer/loaders as well as those internal. It just doesn't end. However, we run as many as 50 new protos a month and our production cycle times, for about 15 new setups per line/day, is 4 days or less shooting for over 20 million placements per month soon. This encompasses over 1500 assembly numbers in current or past production. | | | | | | We now have completed setting up our six Fuji CP and IP lines to do as you are. I cannot even imagine what we've had to do to make these machines perform outside their world of turn on and forget but to reload. | | | | | | Fortunately, we now are getting more help from our new Mydata machines. This only is because we have some extra large panels that won't run on anything else. Maybe, they'll take over all production. | | | | | | Enjoy, | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | My place run Fuji IP3's and Cp6's as a general rule in the low and meduim volume and change over isn't quick in thegranmd scale normally about 30 mins ago but our guy's in the SMD programming team are doing a superb job with common material and program's to cut down change overs. The problems strt to hit as you go to the double tables tho , I like the idea or optimising the second program from 160 down, but doesn't this reduce the flexibility of the line ? we run any board down any line when ever we need to so have complete flexibility. | | The problem with feeding up an IP on a spare device trolly is that you have to push the dam thing into place..out IP's are on base pad's which add probably 3 inches to the height..don't ask the reason cos I don't know..never felt the urge to ask...but trying to push one of those IP trollies into place is a recipe for a bad back!. I guess the best machine I've seen for off line kitting is the Europlacer stuff but it's not great for real volumes. | | In term's of optimisation Fuji just isn't too go at it..that's why they're subing the next generation of programming out..we're looking at 'other' optimiser's that really wo9rk and give result's of usually 30% up on a fuji | | Volumes is a different matter tho'..do you go for the turret or do you go for multiple heads ?? | | We went for in the main Panasert's for hi volumne but change over is minimal and they are great at churning out board after board, changeover time thou is around 45 mins with the mongolian hoard aproach..many hand's and all that. | | Basically the optimisation side of stuff is each to their own I guess but what we have found is by identifying what product's use the same material you can optimise the schedule rather than the program's on their own to reduce the changes so your 1st change maybe 60% of the feed in about 30 mins but changes 2,3,4 may be 5 - 10% and take only 5 mins so it average's out over the day. | | That's great for calculating efective placement rates and machine utilisations..but it also help's stores with kitting and done right can cut the number of feeder's your haveing to tie your precious pound's or dollars up in! | | | | just my ramblins tho | | | | JohnW | | | John, | | You said a bunch. My biggest problem running Fuji, Panasonic, or Sanyo high speed stuff is that they are meant to run free. They are meant, in my mind, to run as thoroughbreds. | | I watch 6" reels placed on feeders, placed on the carts you describe being roled into position only to be consumed within seconds. Then, another cart is roled in and on it goes. | | I just prefer equipment designed for particular needs. I never discount high speed, but use it where needed. I prefer flexibility. Just like PCB design and fabrication, assembly requirements are met through concurrence and the ability to maximize efficiency and effectiveness. | | I guess, if I had my say, I would like to have one or two super high speed lines and another line or two dedicated to high mix, low volume, plus spare machines and the ability to roll one in to mix with another line. We never get that for which we wish, but it doesn't stop us. Also, when is FujiCam and UniCam really going to fulfill its destiny? | | Earl Moon | Earl, spare lines....is some factories you can be shot for suggesting that you know..one of the measure's our place is into is machine utilisation and effectiveness and it aint effective if it's sitting doing nothing. Equally tho I take your point that the hi speed stuff like the CP6 range maybe isn't what you need unless your doing the reel hi volume's. I know only too well your point about 6" reel's being used up, I got 1 board that has a 240+ per usage on each board and the customer keep's supplying 5k reel's..it's murder, finally went for next d position rules and loaded 4 positions with the same stuff. We don't do alot of cart changes it's normally down with the machine and strip and reload for the medium / low volume stuff and concentrate on hitting the numbers at the quality to catch back for the magical million plus placement's a day, since at the end of the day it's only any use if your building something that is right and to the quality we need. The panasert's are running as pure thorough bread's hitting the 40K placement / hr rate

Fuji cam ha yes, they promised ot, people tested it and decided that no way was it getting tried out on the shop floor cos it was that bad, now that unicam has taken up the helm maybe thing's will be different..but then there's Technomatic's as well who have done not to bad plus fabmaster are suppose to be working on new optimisation software as well as Autodoc their documentation side of thing's so that would give a real all in one package, so there are many to choose from and each have their own merit's but so far Fuji just hasn't got it as far as I can see, other's may disagree but heck that's democracy for you.

JohnW

reply »

#10782

A Blurb about Fujicam | 7 July, 1999

Snip | John, | | You said a bunch. My biggest problem running Fuji, Panasonic, or Sanyo high speed stuff is that they are meant to run free. They are meant, in my mind, to run as thoroughbreds. | | I watch 6" reels placed on feeders, placed on the carts you describe being roled into position only to be consumed within seconds. Then, another cart is roled in and on it goes. | | I just prefer equipment designed for particular needs. I never discount high speed, but use it where needed. I prefer flexibility. Just like PCB design and fabrication, assembly requirements are met through concurrence and the ability to maximize efficiency and effectiveness. | | I guess, if I had my say, I would like to have one or two super high speed lines and another line or two dedicated to high mix, low volume, plus spare machines and the ability to roll one in to mix with another line. We never get that for which we wish, but it doesn't stop us. Also, when is FujiCam and UniCam really going to fulfill its destiny? | | Earl Moon | Earl

I have been using Fujicam for about four months now. I love it; my programming time has gone from a couple of days to around 2 hrs. We also use Fujicam for our documentation, prior to the installation of Fujicam it would take our documentation department sometimes a week to make a 1st article print. Now it takes 1-2 hrs. There are still a few bugs, but nothing I can't work around.

MD Cox

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Earl Moon

#10783

Re: A Blurb about Fujicam | 8 July, 1999

| Snip | | John, | | | | You said a bunch. My biggest problem running Fuji, Panasonic, or Sanyo high speed stuff is that they are meant to run free. They are meant, in my mind, to run as thoroughbreds. | | | | I watch 6" reels placed on feeders, placed on the carts you describe being roled into position only to be consumed within seconds. Then, another cart is roled in and on it goes. | | | | I just prefer equipment designed for particular needs. I never discount high speed, but use it where needed. I prefer flexibility. Just like PCB design and fabrication, assembly requirements are met through concurrence and the ability to maximize efficiency and effectiveness. | | | | I guess, if I had my say, I would like to have one or two super high speed lines and another line or two dedicated to high mix, low volume, plus spare machines and the ability to roll one in to mix with another line. We never get that for which we wish, but it doesn't stop us. Also, when is FujiCam and UniCam really going to fulfill its destiny? | | | | Earl Moon | | | Earl | | I have been using Fujicam for about four months now. I love it; my programming time has gone from a couple of days to around 2 hrs. We also use Fujicam for our documentation, prior to the installation of Fujicam it would take our documentation department sometimes a week to make a 1st article print. Now it takes 1-2 hrs. There are still a few bugs, but nothing I can't work around. | | MD Cox | | MD,

Great to hear that and Scott's explanation about where Fuji and Unicam are going. In my current future ex positon, we are lagging too far behind and most folks blame it on our reactive posture. If we could get more control up front, we probably would agree.

Thanks,

Earl Moon

reply »

Steve

#10784

Re: product changeovers | 10 July, 1999

| | John, | | | | You said a bunch. My biggest problem running Fuji, Panasonic, or Sanyo high speed stuff is that they are meant to run free. They are meant, in my mind, to run as thoroughbreds. | | | | I watch 6" reels placed on feeders, placed on the carts you describe being roled into position only to be consumed within seconds. Then, another cart is roled in and on it goes. | | | | I just prefer equipment designed for particular needs. I never discount high speed, but use it where needed. I prefer flexibility. Just like PCB design and fabrication, assembly requirements are met through concurrence and the ability to maximize efficiency and effectiveness. | | | | I guess, if I had my say, I would like to have one or two super high speed lines and another line or two dedicated to high mix, low volume, plus spare machines and the ability to roll one in to mix with another line. We never get that for which we wish, but it doesn't stop us. Also, when is FujiCam and UniCam really going to fulfill its destiny? | | | | Earl Moon | | | | Earl, | | Once again, you give us pearls of wisdom. | | In answer to your rhetorical question: | | Soon, VERY SOON. Get on the train; it's about to go 80 miles an hour! The merger brings very good things....... | | Scott Cook | scook@smtnet.com | | Is that a light or another bigger faster CircuitCAM train at the end of the tunnel? Check out the leader!

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