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Earl Moon

#10155

Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 13 August, 1999

Ladies and Gentlemen,

As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector.

I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches.

The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean?

The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side.

I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately.

My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close.

Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily).

I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night.

Ain't life grand?

Earl Moon

reply »

Peter Barton

#10156

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 13 August, 1999

| Ladies and Gentlemen, | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | Ain't life grand? | | Earl Moon | Earl,

Once you have removed the connector would it not be possible to place the connector site over the bottom side preheat on your rework station, set at a fairly high temperature then attack the top side with a good quality heated vacuum desoldering tool?

So long as the tip I/D on the solder sucker matches that on the PTH on the PCB and the tip is really clean you should get enough heat transmission to melt and remove the remaining solder without removing all the pads as well.

I have had some success using this method in a similar situation. The vacuum desoldering tool I used was a Hakko model 470 but any other with a good vacuum capacity should do.

Hope this helps,

Pete B.

reply »

#10157

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 13 August, 1999

| Ladies and Gentlemen, | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | Ain't life grand? | | Earl Moon | Earl: Aint a DFM/CE "guru" being foisted in repair a little like Roger Clemens taking over for Jorge Posada? But then again, if you're making Clemens money to do Posada work, who cares??

I know exactly what you�re talking about. It�s sad. Are you out looking for new work?

You�re correctamuno, oh grizzled one. Preheating is essential. Here�s what you do (this is a beautiful thing to behold):

� Call Leister 800.700.6894 and buy one of their hand held hot air tools with a custom nozzel made for that lovery connector. Leister can make nozzels fairly quickly. Others (who will remain un-named) talk about tens of years to make a custom nozzel. � Go to Walmart and buy an electric fry pan. Cut the sides from the fry pan. Cut a slot into the center of the fry pan to accept the nozzel, carefully avoiding the heating element. � Cob the whole thing together with the Leister attached below the ex-fry pan / hot plate with the nozzel poking through the slot to be flush with the heating surface. Mount this cobery at bench surface height. � Get geared-up and get to reaming. You may need to protect the Leister from the reamings with a screen.

Yall have a nice weekend now y'hear?

Dave F

reply »

Boca

#10158

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 13 August, 1999

| | Ladies and Gentlemen, | | | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | | | Ain't life grand? | | | | Earl Moon | | | Earl, | | Once you have removed the connector would it not be possible to place the connector site over the bottom side preheat on your rework station, set at a fairly high temperature then attack the top side with a good quality heated vacuum desoldering tool? | | So long as the tip I/D on the solder sucker matches that on the PTH on the PCB and the tip is really clean you should get enough heat transmission to melt and remove the remaining solder without removing all the pads as well. | | I have had some success using this method in a similar situation. The vacuum desoldering tool I used was a Hakko model 470 but any other with a good vacuum capacity should do. | | Hope this helps, | | Pete B. | | | Earl,

Hav'nt done this one myself, but ...

Some of the 'mini wave' rework stations have a hole clearing option which might work. After component removal a silicon boot can be brought down on the site, the wave mini wave cycles to preheat the holes, and a puff of air is applies thru the boot thru the holes to clear any remaining solder. Maybe you've already tried this, in that case ....never mind...

By the way, I appreciate your observations on the obvious tie between DFM/CE and repair /rework, isn't it great?

Best wishes, Boca

reply »

Earl Moon

#10159

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 13 August, 1999

| | Ladies and Gentlemen, | | | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | | | Ain't life grand? | | | | Earl Moon | | | Earl: Aint a DFM/CE "guru" being foisted in repair a little like Roger Clemens taking over for Jorge Posada? But then again, if you're making Clemens money to do Posada work, who cares?? | | I know exactly what you�re talking about. It�s sad. Are you out looking for new work? | | You�re correctamuno, oh grizzled one. Preheating is essential. Here�s what you do (this is a beautiful thing to behold): | | � Call Leister 800.700.6894 and buy one of their hand held hot air tools with a custom nozzel made for that lovery connector. Leister can make nozzels fairly quickly. Others (who will remain un-named) talk about tens of years to make a custom nozzel. | � Go to Walmart and buy an electric fry pan. Cut the sides from the fry pan. Cut a slot into the center of the fry pan to accept the nozzel, carefully avoiding the heating element. | � Cob the whole thing together with the Leister attached below the ex-fry pan / hot plate with the nozzel poking through the slot to be flush with the heating surface. Mount this cobery at bench surface height. | � Get geared-up and get to reaming. You may need to protect the Leister from the reamings with a screen. | | Yall have a nice weekend now y'hear? | | Dave F | Dave, and all you other aspiring DFM/CE/repair specialists,

Can't thank you enough, but Dave you have made my day. I'm on my way to K-Mart (my personal favorite low life shopping adventure spot) to pick two or three of the little frying beauties (in case I butcher one by cutting its little chicken heart out). No offense intended to all you K-Mart shoppers (blue light special on isle 7). After all, I think I almost met a future x wife there once - not this again.

I already have the nozzle of which you speak and have an abundance of rework (not repair) stuff to plug it into. We do DFM here but some boards are so difficult (this really is true), we need a little feedback from the back end from time to time for process improvement (that's why I'm making the Roger, not Clemens, but rabbit money) - and that's the story I'm sticking to. Even so, I'm not looking for other work - yet. That may come if YOUR idea doesn't work. If MINE works, you'll be the first to know and I'll seek a raise from league minimum.

Thanks again all,

Earl

reply »

Earl Moon

#10160

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 13 August, 1999

| | | Ladies and Gentlemen, | | | | | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | | | | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | | | | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | | | | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | | | | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | | | | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | | | | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | | | | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | | | | | Ain't life grand? | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | Earl, | | | | Once you have removed the connector would it not be possible to place the connector site over the bottom side preheat on your rework station, set at a fairly high temperature then attack the top side with a good quality heated vacuum desoldering tool? | | | | So long as the tip I/D on the solder sucker matches that on the PTH on the PCB and the tip is really clean you should get enough heat transmission to melt and remove the remaining solder without removing all the pads as well. | | | | I have had some success using this method in a similar situation. The vacuum desoldering tool I used was a Hakko model 470 but any other with a good vacuum capacity should do. | | | | Hope this helps, | | | | Pete B. | | | | | | | Earl, | | Hav'nt done this one myself, but ... | | Some of the 'mini wave' rework stations have a hole clearing option which might work. After component removal a silicon boot can be brought down on the site, the wave mini wave cycles to preheat the holes, and a puff of air is applies thru the boot thru the holes to clear any remaining solder. Maybe you've already tried this, in that case ....never mind... | | By the way, I appreciate your observations on the obvious tie between DFM/CE and repair /rework, isn't it great? | | Best wishes, | Boca | Peter and Boca,

Thanks for the input. Peter, the solder sucker idea almost worked, but won't get it over the long haul. Thanks.

Boca,

Glad you liked my little snip at this very nearly funny subject. Also got my attention about this boot blower thing. As I've not been a practicing mini-wave fan for many years, I don't keep up on the latest and greatest. Any ideas where I might get one of these attachments while telling me how the process is performed in a reasonably safe manner - short of outdoors.

Thanks again guys. Great stuff,

Earl

reply »

ScottM

#10161

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 13 August, 1999

| | | | Ladies and Gentlemen, | | | | | | | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | | | | | | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | | | | | | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | | | | | | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | | | | | | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | | | | | | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | | | | | | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | | | | | | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | | | | | | | Ain't life grand? | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | | Once you have removed the connector would it not be possible to place the connector site over the bottom side preheat on your rework station, set at a fairly high temperature then attack the top side with a good quality heated vacuum desoldering tool? | | | | | | So long as the tip I/D on the solder sucker matches that on the PTH on the PCB and the tip is really clean you should get enough heat transmission to melt and remove the remaining solder without removing all the pads as well. | | | | | | I have had some success using this method in a similar situation. The vacuum desoldering tool I used was a Hakko model 470 but any other with a good vacuum capacity should do. | | | | | | Hope this helps, | | | | | | Pete B. | | | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | Hav'nt done this one myself, but ... | | | | Some of the 'mini wave' rework stations have a hole clearing option which might work. After component removal a silicon boot can be brought down on the site, the wave mini wave cycles to preheat the holes, and a puff of air is applies thru the boot thru the holes to clear any remaining solder. Maybe you've already tried this, in that case ....never mind... | | | | By the way, I appreciate your observations on the obvious tie between DFM/CE and repair /rework, isn't it great? | | | | Best wishes, | | Boca | | | Peter and Boca, | | Thanks for the input. Peter, the solder sucker idea almost worked, but won't get it over the long haul. Thanks. | | Boca, | | Glad you liked my little snip at this very nearly funny subject. Also got my attention about this boot blower thing. As I've not been a practicing mini-wave fan for many years, I don't keep up on the latest and greatest. Any ideas where I might get one of these attachments while telling me how the process is performed in a reasonably safe manner - short of outdoors. | | Thanks again guys. Great stuff, | | Earl | AirVac is the company that makes these critters, all sorts of sizes. Though they're made for their machine a little bit of tubing and a hookup to an air regulator should work.

Scott

reply »

#10162

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 15 August, 1999

| Ladies and Gentlemen, | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | Ain't life grand? | | Earl Moon | Earl,

You've got a challenge there. Sound similar to so many nasty projects we've worked on over the years. The thickness of the PCB combined with the small holes makes this extra difficult.

We have 4 Electrovert SoldaPac solder reflow systems and would certainly use on this project. As you described, removal is fairly easy. One the connector is removed we'd use the solder reflow system fitted with a blow out nozzle to clear the holes. Steps follow: 1. Remove old connector and clean area. 2. Apply peelable or water soluble mask around rework site to protect areas from solder spray. 3. Preheat PCB at 75C for 30 minutes. 4. Apply flux and place the PCB back on solder fountain. A few seconds after solder reflow place nozzle over site and simultaneously drop solder wave and blow out solder with blow out tool. 5. Those holes that do not clear using the blow out process can be cleared using a standard hand held desoldering tool combined with auxiliary heat. 6. With the holes clear, the new connector could be inserted and reflowed again with the solder reflow system.

You can't underestimate operator skill and experience, they're essential.

Earl, this is a tough one, but I believe we'd use this technique vs. others mentioned. If you have a spare, send us one, I'll give it a try with this method.

You can review our method in more detail if you visit our online guidebook at www.circuitnet.com/catalog/c8-1-2.htm

Jeff Ferry

reply »

#10163

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 16 August, 1999

I don't know if you have tried this but... What if after removing the bad connector, while the holes are still molten you insert the new one right into the holes?

This is the way we do it, and it seems to work

Good luck

reply »

Earl Moon

#10164

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 16 August, 1999

| I don't know if you have tried this but... | What if after removing the bad connector, while the holes are still molten you insert the new one right into the holes? | | This is the way we do it, and it seems to work | | Good luck | Mike and Scott,

Thanks for the input. One of our biggest problems relates to attempting connector replacement immediately after removal while still on the wave. I won't go into it, but it's another nightmare as the 22 layer board with the small hole and connector pin sizes already mentioned doesn't like it and the board is on the wave over 3 minutes when you can get the replacement to even start going in.

Thanks again, and Mike did you get the master drawing notes and other stuff I posted?

Earl Moon

reply »

#10165

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 17 August, 1999

| | I don't know if you have tried this but... | | What if after removing the bad connector, while the holes are still molten you insert the new one right into the holes? | | | | This is the way we do it, and it seems to work | | | | Good luck | | | Mike and Scott, | | Thanks for the input. One of our biggest problems relates to attempting connector replacement immediately after removal while still on the wave. I won't go into it, but it's another nightmare as the 22 layer board with the small hole and connector pin sizes already mentioned doesn't like it and the board is on the wave over 3 minutes when you can get the replacement to even start going in. | | Thanks again, and Mike did you get the master drawing notes and other stuff I posted? | | Earl Moon

Yes I did, Thank you it will be very helpfull.

Mike |

reply »

Boca

#10166

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 17 August, 1999

| | | | Ladies and Gentlemen, | | | | | | | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | | | | | | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | | | | | | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | | | | | | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | | | | | | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | | | | | | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | | | | | | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | | | | | | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | | | | | | | Ain't life grand? | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | | Once you have removed the connector would it not be possible to place the connector site over the bottom side preheat on your rework station, set at a fairly high temperature then attack the top side with a good quality heated vacuum desoldering tool? | | | | | | So long as the tip I/D on the solder sucker matches that on the PTH on the PCB and the tip is really clean you should get enough heat transmission to melt and remove the remaining solder without removing all the pads as well. | | | | | | I have had some success using this method in a similar situation. The vacuum desoldering tool I used was a Hakko model 470 but any other with a good vacuum capacity should do. | | | | | | Hope this helps, | | | | | | Pete B. | | | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | Hav'nt done this one myself, but ... | | | | Some of the 'mini wave' rework stations have a hole clearing option which might work. After component removal a silicon boot can be brought down on the site, the wave mini wave cycles to preheat the holes, and a puff of air is applies thru the boot thru the holes to clear any remaining solder. Maybe you've already tried this, in that case ....never mind... | | | | By the way, I appreciate your observations on the obvious tie between DFM/CE and repair /rework, isn't it great? | | | | Best wishes, | | Boca | | | Peter and Boca, | | Thanks for the input. Peter, the solder sucker idea almost worked, but won't get it over the long haul. Thanks. | | Boca, | | Glad you liked my little snip at this very nearly funny subject. Also got my attention about this boot blower thing. As I've not been a practicing mini-wave fan for many years, I don't keep up on the latest and greatest. Any ideas where I might get one of these attachments while telling me how the process is performed in a reasonably safe manner - short of outdoors. | | Thanks again guys. Great stuff, | | Earl | Earl, The 'mini wave' we use in the AirVac PCBRM12. It has a wide array of features and can be scaled up to include preheaters and ..... We kept it simple, just the base unit. One of the options has a silicon boot (they call it a cleaning hood) which matches the footprint of the nozzle mounted below the fab. The boot is brought down over the holes while solder is still liquid, and a puff of air blows the solder out of the holes. Pretty safe because the fab is mounted on the machine and the solder nozzle is below the fab, shouldn't be any stray solder blowing around. Some of their products are seen at http://air-vac-eng.com/srm4.htm

You can do this indoors or out, your preference. (Sorry, I slipped, I try to control my sarcasim, it can easily be misunderstood in print, or in real life for that matter....)

Have a great time, Boca

reply »

Boca

#10167

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 17 August, 1999

| | | | | Ladies and Gentlemen, | | | | | | | | | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | | | | | | | | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | | | | | | | | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | | | | | | | | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | | | | | | | | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | | | | | | | | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | | | | | | | | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | | | | | | | | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | | | | | | | | | Ain't life grand? | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | | | | Once you have removed the connector would it not be possible to place the connector site over the bottom side preheat on your rework station, set at a fairly high temperature then attack the top side with a good quality heated vacuum desoldering tool? | | | | | | | | So long as the tip I/D on the solder sucker matches that on the PTH on the PCB and the tip is really clean you should get enough heat transmission to melt and remove the remaining solder without removing all the pads as well. | | | | | | | | I have had some success using this method in a similar situation. The vacuum desoldering tool I used was a Hakko model 470 but any other with a good vacuum capacity should do. | | | | | | | | Hope this helps, | | | | | | | | Pete B. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | | Hav'nt done this one myself, but ... | | | | | | Some of the 'mini wave' rework stations have a hole clearing option which might work. After component removal a silicon boot can be brought down on the site, the wave mini wave cycles to preheat the holes, and a puff of air is applies thru the boot thru the holes to clear any remaining solder. Maybe you've already tried this, in that case ....never mind... | | | | | | By the way, I appreciate your observations on the obvious tie between DFM/CE and repair /rework, isn't it great? | | | | | | Best wishes, | | | Boca | | | | | Peter and Boca, | | | | Thanks for the input. Peter, the solder sucker idea almost worked, but won't get it over the long haul. Thanks. | | | | Boca, | | | | Glad you liked my little snip at this very nearly funny subject. Also got my attention about this boot blower thing. As I've not been a practicing mini-wave fan for many years, I don't keep up on the latest and greatest. Any ideas where I might get one of these attachments while telling me how the process is performed in a reasonably safe manner - short of outdoors. | | | | Thanks again guys. Great stuff, | | | | Earl | | | Earl, | The 'mini wave' we use in the AirVac PCBRM12. It has a wide array of features and can be scaled up to include preheaters and ..... We kept it simple, just the base unit. One of the options has a silicon boot (they call it a cleaning hood) which matches the footprint of the nozzle mounted below the fab. The boot is brought down over the holes while solder is still liquid, and a puff of air blows the solder out of the holes. Pretty safe because the fab is mounted on the machine and the solder nozzle is below the fab, shouldn't be any stray solder blowing around. Some of their products are seen at http://air-vac-eng.com/srm4.htm | | You can do this indoors or out, your preference. (Sorry, I slipped, I try to control my sarcasim, it can easily be misunderstood in print, or in real life for that matter....) | | Have a great time, | Boca | |

reply »

Earl Moon

#10168

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 17 August, 1999

| | | | | | Ladies and Gentlemen, | | | | | | | | | | | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | | | | | | | | | | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | | | | | | | | | | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | | | | | | | | | | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | | | | | | | | | | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | | | | | | | | | | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | | | | | | | | | | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | | | | | | | | | | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | | | | | | | | | | | Ain't life grand? | | | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | | | | | | Once you have removed the connector would it not be possible to place the connector site over the bottom side preheat on your rework station, set at a fairly high temperature then attack the top side with a good quality heated vacuum desoldering tool? | | | | | | | | | | So long as the tip I/D on the solder sucker matches that on the PTH on the PCB and the tip is really clean you should get enough heat transmission to melt and remove the remaining solder without removing all the pads as well. | | | | | | | | | | I have had some success using this method in a similar situation. The vacuum desoldering tool I used was a Hakko model 470 but any other with a good vacuum capacity should do. | | | | | | | | | | Hope this helps, | | | | | | | | | | Pete B. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | | | | Hav'nt done this one myself, but ... | | | | | | | | Some of the 'mini wave' rework stations have a hole clearing option which might work. After component removal a silicon boot can be brought down on the site, the wave mini wave cycles to preheat the holes, and a puff of air is applies thru the boot thru the holes to clear any remaining solder. Maybe you've already tried this, in that case ....never mind... | | | | | | | | By the way, I appreciate your observations on the obvious tie between DFM/CE and repair /rework, isn't it great? | | | | | | | | Best wishes, | | | | Boca | | | | | | | Peter and Boca, | | | | | | Thanks for the input. Peter, the solder sucker idea almost worked, but won't get it over the long haul. Thanks. | | | | | | Boca, | | | | | | Glad you liked my little snip at this very nearly funny subject. Also got my attention about this boot blower thing. As I've not been a practicing mini-wave fan for many years, I don't keep up on the latest and greatest. Any ideas where I might get one of these attachments while telling me how the process is performed in a reasonably safe manner - short of outdoors. | | | | | | Thanks again guys. Great stuff, | | | | | | Earl | | | | | Earl, | | The 'mini wave' we use in the AirVac PCBRM12. It has a wide array of features and can be scaled up to include preheaters and ..... We kept it simple, just the base unit. One of the options has a silicon boot (they call it a cleaning hood) which matches the footprint of the nozzle mounted below the fab. The boot is brought down over the holes while solder is still liquid, and a puff of air blows the solder out of the holes. Pretty safe because the fab is mounted on the machine and the solder nozzle is below the fab, shouldn't be any stray solder blowing around. Some of their products are seen at http://air-vac-eng.com/srm4.htm | | | | You can do this indoors or out, your preference. (Sorry, I slipped, I try to control my sarcasim, it can easily be misunderstood in print, or in real life for that matter....) | | | | Have a great time, | | Boca | | | | | | Boca baby,

I do appreciate the input. Referencing my latest posting about Air-Vac stuff, I am trying to get a line on the SRM4. It looks to be a scaled down version of your PCBRM. After talking with Air-Vac this morning, it appears getting one of these things for demo is going to be very difficult. Can I come over to your place and try one out?

Thanks again, but I still need to know how well these things work on thick, high layer count boards, with really small holes.

Enjoy,

Earl Moon

reply »

John Dwinell

#10169

Re: Micropax Connector Repair (Through Hole Version) | 17 August, 1999

| | | | | | Ladies and Gentlemen, | | | | | | | | | | | | As a newly appointed DFM/CE "guru" here, one of my responsibilities has become repair (of course). As I have some knowledge of BGA repair/rework using semi-automated equipment, it naturally follows I would hav tremendous insight about how to repair a little nitemare connector. | | | | | | | | | | | | I need not go into detail about the connector for those of you knowing its properties. Simply, the through hole version we are using goes into a serious MLB that is .125" thick. Finished plated hole sizes are .021" and the connector pins are about .017"-.018" flimsy, never straight, rectangular little bitches. | | | | | | | | | | | | The current process was never proven successful based on consistency and all the other stuff going into whatever successful is supposed to be. The thinking is to use my favorite repair equipment as a messy little mini-wave. Ok so far as the connector comes out fairly easy. The trick is getting a new one back in. Does anyone know, or care, what I mean? | | | | | | | | | | | | The biggest problems after removal is cleaning out the holes of residual solder. Solder sucking or blowing doesn't get it. I came up with an idea, yet unsuccessful as well, that uses a thermal "drill" to melt through the stuff and push it out the other side. | | | | | | | | | | | | I am using a lathe turned-off soldering iron tip with a hole drilled in machined off end. I placed a broken .018" diameter drill tip into that hole and swedged it in place. Then, I inserted tip into iron handle and went at it. Of course, board's thermal mass was to much to make progress as the tip bogged down immediately. | | | | | | | | | | | | My thoughts now turn to mounting the board on top of the SRT's bottom side heater and cranking up its temp to about 300 C to get closer to the eutectic melting point. Then, I'll insert the soldering iron tip in the top and see what happens. Still, I wonder, there must be a better way to get the holes cleaned out, and no - mechanical drilling wont' get it even close. | | | | | | | | | | | | Once the holes are clean, back to the mini-wave and insert the connector into the board using an alignment fixture so the pins won't bind and bend (they do this very easily). | | | | | | | | | | | | I would appreciate any input concerning this type wierd repair operation. Some of you, probably only one of you, has done something like this more than twice. I would appreciate seeing from those of you successful as I need answers by next tuesday or my DFM/CE/Repair/Rework career may come to an end. By the way, I just inherited this project last night. | | | | | | | | | | | | Ain't life grand? | | | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | | | | | | Once you have removed the connector would it not be possible to place the connector site over the bottom side preheat on your rework station, set at a fairly high temperature then attack the top side with a good quality heated vacuum desoldering tool? | | | | | | | | | | So long as the tip I/D on the solder sucker matches that on the PTH on the PCB and the tip is really clean you should get enough heat transmission to melt and remove the remaining solder without removing all the pads as well. | | | | | | | | | | I have had some success using this method in a similar situation. The vacuum desoldering tool I used was a Hakko model 470 but any other with a good vacuum capacity should do. | | | | | | | | | | Hope this helps, | | | | | | | | | | Pete B. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Earl, | | | | | | | | Hav'nt done this one myself, but ... | | | | | | | | Some of the 'mini wave' rework stations have a hole clearing option which might work. After component removal a silicon boot can be brought down on the site, the wave mini wave cycles to preheat the holes, and a puff of air is applies thru the boot thru the holes to clear any remaining solder. Maybe you've already tried this, in that case ....never mind... | | | | | | | | By the way, I appreciate your observations on the obvious tie between DFM/CE and repair /rework, isn't it great? | | | | | | | | Best wishes, | | | | Boca | | | | | | | Peter and Boca, | | | | | | Thanks for the input. Peter, the solder sucker idea almost worked, but won't get it over the long haul. Thanks. | | | | | | Boca, | | | | | | Glad you liked my little snip at this very nearly funny subject. Also got my attention about this boot blower thing. As I've not been a practicing mini-wave fan for many years, I don't keep up on the latest and greatest. Any ideas where I might get one of these attachments while telling me how the process is performed in a reasonably safe manner - short of outdoors. | | | | | | Thanks again guys. Great stuff, | | | | | | Earl | | | | | Earl, | | The 'mini wave' we use in the AirVac PCBRM12. It has a wide array of features and can be scaled up to include preheaters and ..... We kept it simple, just the base unit. One of the options has a silicon boot (they call it a cleaning hood) which matches the footprint of the nozzle mounted below the fab. The boot is brought down over the holes while solder is still liquid, and a puff of air blows the solder out of the holes. Pretty safe because the fab is mounted on the machine and the solder nozzle is below the fab, shouldn't be any stray solder blowing around. Some of their products are seen at http://air-vac-eng.com/srm4.htm | | | | You can do this indoors or out, your preference. (Sorry, I slipped, I try to control my sarcasim, it can easily be misunderstood in print, or in real life for that matter....) | | | | Have a great time, | | Boca | | | | | |

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