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Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free

Nams

#9868

Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free | 1 September, 1999

Is there any Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free

electronic product in Europe, U.S.A. and Japan?

If you have any summarized data about that, Let me know.

reply »

Brian

#9869

Re: Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free | 1 September, 1999

| Is there any Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free | | electronic product in Europe, U.S.A. and Japan? | | If you have any summarized data about that, Let me know. | | There is no legislation, as far as I know, in either the USA or Europe. Japan is probably further advanced in this field but I'm not sure whether there is any actual or proposed legislation. Europe is proposing a legislation to forbid the use of lead in solder as from 2004, but this has not nor I hope will be enacted.

However, "lead-free" electronics is not the same as "lead-free" solder. Half the weight of your TV set or computer monitor is lead, to be found in the envelope of the cathode-ray tube, assuming you do not use an LCD or plasma display. 3/4 the weight of an x-ray tube housing is lead. Not to mention that many high-power UPSs use lead-acid batteries (and some others Nicad ones, the cadmium being far more toxic than lead). I maintain that electronics totally exempt from lead - and vast quantities at that - is a pipe-dream, so why bother about the relatively small quantities used in solder? Especially so when recycling it seems a good option.

Now, I'll ask you a question. The engine computer of a car works in the harshest environment imaginable. But it is not the fact that it should operate at any temperature between, say, -50�C to +100�C that is determinant, but the fact that it may be forced to change 100� in less than one hour. Would YOU want to drive a car where the joining methods in the engine computer or the ABS braking system does not have the ductility of tin/lead solder and where these electronics are subject to vibration and shock, to boot?

I am more than environmentally conscious but I do not have my head in the ozone layer like the technocrats of the European Union and the proponents of the Reid Bill in the USA who wish to ban lead in solder. My main arguments are: - banning lead in solder will cost dearly - it will reduce the reliability of electronics, generally - no case of lead poisoning from electronics soldering has ever been documented, to my knowledge - recycling the lead is feasible - dumping electronics in landfills can be done to prevent the the lead from polluting soil and groundwater.

It is my contention that everyone working in the electronics industry should vociferously fight to maintain the use of lead in solder, BUT to acknowledge that lead may cause problems if mismanaged and therefore to support recycling it. I published an editorial to this effect about 8 years ago, when the subject was before US Congress, and I have not changed my position since.

In short, BANNING LEAD IN SOLDER IS UNNECESSARY.

Brian

reply »

Earl Moon

#9870

Re: Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free | 1 September, 1999

| | Is there any Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free | | | | electronic product in Europe, U.S.A. and Japan? | | | | If you have any summarized data about that, Let me know. | | | | | There is no legislation, as far as I know, in either the USA or Europe. Japan is probably further advanced in this field but I'm not sure whether there is any actual or proposed legislation. Europe is proposing a legislation to forbid the use of lead in solder as from 2004, but this has not nor I hope will be enacted. | | However, "lead-free" electronics is not the same as "lead-free" solder. Half the weight of your TV set or computer monitor is lead, to be found in the envelope of the cathode-ray tube, assuming you do not use an LCD or plasma display. 3/4 the weight of an x-ray tube housing is lead. Not to mention that many high-power UPSs use lead-acid batteries (and some others Nicad ones, the cadmium being far more toxic than lead). I maintain that electronics totally exempt from lead - and vast quantities at that - is a pipe-dream, so why bother about the relatively small quantities used in solder? Especially so when recycling it seems a good option. | | Now, I'll ask you a question. The engine computer of a car works in the harshest environment imaginable. But it is not the fact that it should operate at any temperature between, say, -50�C to +100�C that is determinant, but the fact that it may be forced to change 100� in less than one hour. Would YOU want to drive a car where the joining methods in the engine computer or the ABS braking system does not have the ductility of tin/lead solder and where these electronics are subject to vibration and shock, to boot? | | I am more than environmentally conscious but I do not have my head in the ozone layer like the technocrats of the European Union and the proponents of the Reid Bill in the USA who wish to ban lead in solder. My main arguments are: | - banning lead in solder will cost dearly | - it will reduce the reliability of electronics, generally | - no case of lead poisoning from electronics soldering has ever been documented, to my knowledge | - recycling the lead is feasible | - dumping electronics in landfills can be done to prevent the the lead from polluting soil and groundwater. | | It is my contention that everyone working in the electronics industry should vociferously fight to maintain the use of lead in solder, BUT to acknowledge that lead may cause problems if mismanaged and therefore to support recycling it. I published an editorial to this effect about 8 years ago, when the subject was before US Congress, and I have not changed my position since. | | In short, BANNING LEAD IN SOLDER IS UNNECESSARY. | | Brian | I'll second all that.

Earl Moon

reply »

Boca

#9871

Re: Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free | 2 September, 1999

| | | Is there any Legistration and(or) Regulation for Lead Free | | | | | | electronic product in Europe, U.S.A. and Japan? | | | | | | If you have any summarized data about that, Let me know. | | | | | | | | There is no legislation, as far as I know, in either the USA or Europe. Japan is probably further advanced in this field but I'm not sure whether there is any actual or proposed legislation. Europe is proposing a legislation to forbid the use of lead in solder as from 2004, but this has not nor I hope will be enacted. | | | | However, "lead-free" electronics is not the same as "lead-free" solder. Half the weight of your TV set or computer monitor is lead, to be found in the envelope of the cathode-ray tube, assuming you do not use an LCD or plasma display. 3/4 the weight of an x-ray tube housing is lead. Not to mention that many high-power UPSs use lead-acid batteries (and some others Nicad ones, the cadmium being far more toxic than lead). I maintain that electronics totally exempt from lead - and vast quantities at that - is a pipe-dream, so why bother about the relatively small quantities used in solder? Especially so when recycling it seems a good option. | | | | Now, I'll ask you a question. The engine computer of a car works in the harshest environment imaginable. But it is not the fact that it should operate at any temperature between, say, -50�C to +100�C that is determinant, but the fact that it may be forced to change 100� in less than one hour. Would YOU want to drive a car where the joining methods in the engine computer or the ABS braking system does not have the ductility of tin/lead solder and where these electronics are subject to vibration and shock, to boot? | | | | I am more than environmentally conscious but I do not have my head in the ozone layer like the technocrats of the European Union and the proponents of the Reid Bill in the USA who wish to ban lead in solder. My main arguments are: | | - banning lead in solder will cost dearly | | - it will reduce the reliability of electronics, generally | | - no case of lead poisoning from electronics soldering has ever been documented, to my knowledge | | - recycling the lead is feasible | | - dumping electronics in landfills can be done to prevent the the lead from polluting soil and groundwater. | | | | It is my contention that everyone working in the electronics industry should vociferously fight to maintain the use of lead in solder, BUT to acknowledge that lead may cause problems if mismanaged and therefore to support recycling it. I published an editorial to this effect about 8 years ago, when the subject was before US Congress, and I have not changed my position since. | | | | In short, BANNING LEAD IN SOLDER IS UNNECESSARY. | | | | Brian | | | I'll second all that. | | Earl Moon | I'm up for third's.

That cost of lead replacement is not just on the backs of 'capitalist pigs' (60's flashback) but is passed on to all end users. Simple economics says as product price increases the demand decreases. Reduced product demand means less manufacturing, reduced jobs, lower pay, human suffering ... All because 'some' lead from 'some' items may be mismanaged and result in 'some' harm.

Sorry for venting, but I have strong opinions on this subject.

The lead free idea has caught on and is probably inevitable, so off we go developing more replacement processes (when replacement materials are available) putzing away time better spent on productive matters... There I go again.

Thanks for listening,

Boca

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