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C.K.

#9675

DE-IONIZED WATER SUPPLIERS | 9 September, 1999

Hello SMTNEtters':

Does anyone know of any suppliers who can supply De-I H20 (some high-quality H20!!) in 55 gallon containers.

We have no use for "point-of-use" treatment, like mixed bed, anion, or cation tanks, or anything like that...we're a NO-CLEAN shop.

We just basically need De-I water to replace alcohol on our spray fluxers. We're running VOC-Free on a couple of our lines now.

Please let me know.

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#9676

Re: DE-IONIZED WATER SUPPLIERS | 9 September, 1999

What quality DI water do you need(ie >1 MOHM, 18 MOHM)?

What state are you located?

What type of volume will you use (1 drum per week, month, year)?

Mike (800) 218-8128

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#9677

Re: DE-IONIZED WATER SUPPLIERS | 9 September, 1999

| Hello SMTNEtters': | | Does anyone know of any suppliers who can supply De-I H20 (some high-quality H20!!) in 55 gallon containers. | | We have no use for "point-of-use" treatment, like mixed bed, anion, or cation tanks, or anything like that...we're a NO-CLEAN shop. | | We just basically need De-I water to replace alcohol on our spray fluxers. We're running VOC-Free on a couple of our lines now. | | Please let me know. | hello CK I've not heard of anyone selling it like you request and it certainly would not last long in a 55 gal steel drum until it was on the floor. I use DI for the same purpose that you are proposing and its source is a modest water system that sits under the sink. It consists of a particulate prefilter and a deionizing cartridge with a neon type dissolved solids indicator. It cost <$400 and has functioned for several years with only a few cartridge changes. The prefilter is one of those 6" x 12" "whole house filters from Home Depot and the deionizing components came from McMaster-Carr. It certainly wouldn't work for a cleaner but for thinning flux it's fine. John Thorup

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#9678

Re: DE-IONIZED WATER SUPPLIERS | 9 September, 1999

| | Hello SMTNEtters': | | | | Does anyone know of any suppliers who can supply De-I H20 (some high-quality H20!!) in 55 gallon containers. | | | | We have no use for "point-of-use" treatment, like mixed bed, anion, or cation tanks, or anything like that...we're a NO-CLEAN shop. | | | | We just basically need De-I water to replace alcohol on our spray fluxers. We're running VOC-Free on a couple of our lines now. | | | | Please let me know. | | | hello CK | I've not heard of anyone selling it like you request and it certainly would not last long in a 55 gal steel drum until it was on the floor. | I use DI for the same purpose that you are proposing and its source is a modest water system that sits under the sink. It consists of a particulate prefilter and a deionizing cartridge with a neon type dissolved solids indicator. It cost <$400 and has functioned for several years with only a few cartridge changes. The prefilter is one of those 6" x 12" "whole house filters from Home Depot and the deionizing components came from McMaster-Carr. It certainly wouldn't work for a cleaner but for thinning flux it's fine. | John Thorup | CK: Just to continue with John's thought ... well may be not his thought, but it's my thought based on what I thought his thought would be ...

Anyhow, your 55 gallon drum of DI water will have a pH of 5.5 when opened. It immediately will begin absorbing CO2 in the air and forming carbonic acid. This acid will then re-ionize your deionized water, until the pH reaches 7.0 and it will be very similar to the stuff coming from your tap. The rate of reaction is based largely on the resistivity of your soon to be dedeionized water ... the higher the resistivity, the faster the rate of reaction.

Cool eh?

Dave F

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ScottM

#9679

Re: DE-IONIZED WATER SUPPLIERS | 10 September, 1999

| Hello SMTNEtters': | | Does anyone know of any suppliers who can supply De-I H20 (some high-quality H20!!) in 55 gallon containers. | | We have no use for "point-of-use" treatment, like mixed bed, anion, or cation tanks, or anything like that...we're a NO-CLEAN shop. | | We just basically need De-I water to replace alcohol on our spray fluxers. We're running VOC-Free on a couple of our lines now. | | Please let me know. | Have you thought about running down to the supermarket and buying distilled water in 1 gallon containers?

Scott

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Brian

#9680

Re: DE-IONIZED WATER SUPPLIERS | 10 September, 1999

I'll go along with what John and Dave say. If you must buy it in (and it will be expensive), then never buy it in greater quantities than 25 litres in new PE containers or 1 week's supply, whichever is the smaller, from a local supplier who can guarantee the date of packing. Use within a month of packing. I second the notion that it will be cheaper to have a small mixed bed unit, such as repair garages use for battery water.

Brian

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C.K.

#9681

Re: DE-IONIZED WATER SUPPLIERS | 10 September, 1999

| What quality DI water do you need(ie >1 MOHM, 18 MOHM)? | | What state are you located? | | What type of volume will you use (1 drum per week, month, year)? | | Mike | (800) 218-8128 |

We are located in Illinois (Southwest Suburb of Chicago). Our usage will probably be in the 1 drum per month ballpark. We don't need mega-quality (1 MOHM would probably suffice) water, since we're only using it for cleaning wave solder fluxing equipment.

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Brian

#9682

Re: DE-IONIZED WATER SUPPLIERS | 11 September, 1999

| | What quality DI water do you need(ie >1 MOHM, 18 MOHM)? | | | | What state are you located? | | | | What type of volume will you use (1 drum per week, month, year)? | | | | Mike | | (800) 218-8128 | | | | We are located in Illinois (Southwest Suburb of Chicago). Our usage will probably be in the 1 drum per month ballpark. We don't need mega-quality (1 MOHM would probably suffice) water, since we're only using it for cleaning wave solder fluxing equipment. | For the 10 litres/day, your best bet is a filter/mixed bed deioniser with, say, 50 - 100 litres of resins. With medium quality tap water, this will last you typically 2-3 months before a cartridge change at 1 �S-cm. Initial capital cost, with a conductivity meter, will be typically in the thousand buck range and cartridge changes a few tens, if you shop around. If you buy the stuff in, with a guarantee on quality and stated packing dates, it will probably cost you 2-3 times more, counted over a 2 year amortisation. If it's cheaper than that, then it is probably not good quality, because the guy who is packing it will probably be doing exactly the same AND you will be paying for the containers. Remember, never store DI water in an opened container for more than a week: it will no longer be DI.

FYI, my company made thousands of litres of ionic conductivity testing solution (50% and 75% purest isopropanol, rest RO + DI water with conductivity < 0.075 �S-cm) and we had to re-polish the water back to spec if it had been kept in a sealed container for just one day. OK, I grant you, this spec is a lot tighter than you need, but it illustrates how unstable DI water is. If you have an open tray of such water, it will stabilise from 0.075 to c. 1 �S-cm (depending on local pollutants) within hours, without agitation, much faster with.

Brian

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