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Mini Mike

#9522

1 mil = ?? inches | 16 September, 1999

I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil?

...or 10 mil?

reply »

KCA Electronics, Inc

#9523

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 16 September, 1999

| I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | ...or 10 mil? | | 1 mil= .001 inches 10 mil= .010 inches Also, it has nothing to do with metric.

reply »

Earl Moon

#9524

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 16 September, 1999

| I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | ...or 10 mil? | | each mil = .001"

Earl Moon

reply »

Dreamsniper

#9525

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 16 September, 1999

| | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches | 10 mil= .010 inches | Also, it has nothing to do with metric.

I was also confused with this standard of measuring before and it depends on which country you are in. Like me here in Australia, people speak of "mil in metric" and to some people here that term is for "millimeter" and when they speak of "thou" that term is for "mil in imperial system".

But the correct conversion is :

1 mil= .001 inches or one thousandt of an inch 1 inch = 1000 mil | 10 mil= .010 inches

| AND it has nothing to do with metric...

Taking from my many experiences working in different countries...=)

armin |

reply »

Charles Stringer

#9526

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 17 September, 1999

| | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | each mil = .001" | | Earl Moon | At risk of informing someones grandmother on the art of removing the contents of an egg without breaking the shell.

mil is an abbreviation of milli meaning 1/1000 e.g 1 Millimetre is 1 meter/1000 The term is also applied to imperial units of measure as given above. In the UK 0.001" is called a thou as opposed to a mil which often is used as an abbreviation for 1 millimetre

If you are from the colonies then 1 mil = 0.001" = 1 thou = .0254mm or 1mm = 39.37 mil or thou

I hope the above is clear it was in my head before I started typing.

On a different note there is a little used unit called a millihelen this is defined as the amount of beauty required to launch one ship........

reply »

Brian

#9527

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 17 September, 1999

| | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | each mil = .001" | | | | Earl Moon | | | At risk of informing someones grandmother on the art of removing the contents of an egg without breaking the shell. | | mil is an abbreviation of milli meaning 1/1000 | e.g 1 Millimetre is 1 meter/1000 | The term is also applied to imperial units of measure as given above. In the UK 0.001" is called a thou as opposed to a mil which often is used as an abbreviation for 1 millimetre | | If you are from the colonies then 1 mil = 0.001" = 1 thou = .0254mm | or 1mm = 39.37 mil or thou | | I hope the above is clear it was in my head before I started typing. | | On a different note there is a little used unit called a millihelen this is defined as the amount of beauty required to launch one ship........ | | Boy! Am I glad you cleared that up: I was about to add similar remarks until I saw yours. I would like to add that 'mil' (metric or inchic) and 'thou' are both slang, or at least jargon, terms and should not be used in written language. Write "34 mils" as "0.034 inches" or, better still, according to the new decimal conventions, "0,034 inches". This is totally unambiguous. For those unaware of this convention, the Germanic and Gallic countries have used a comma as a decimal point since time immemorial and ISO now recommend it in preference to the full stop or the point placed half-way up the line because the full stop in many computer fonts is quasi-invisible (Arial included). So what about thousands dividers? In these countries, both the full stop and the apostrophe have been used, but ISO recommends a space (e.g., 1 234 567,89 rather than 1.234.567,89 or 1'234'567,89). For fractions, the leading zero before the decimal point is obligatory (e.g., 0,123 and not .123 or ,123, which would be ambiguous if your fax machine lost the punctuation sign or whatever).

However, I'm havering off-topic.

Brian

reply »

Earl Moon

#9528

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 17 September, 1999

| | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | each mil = .001" | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | At risk of informing someones grandmother on the art of removing the contents of an egg without breaking the shell. | | | | mil is an abbreviation of milli meaning 1/1000 | | e.g 1 Millimetre is 1 meter/1000 | | The term is also applied to imperial units of measure as given above. In the UK 0.001" is called a thou as opposed to a mil which often is used as an abbreviation for 1 millimetre | | | | If you are from the colonies then 1 mil = 0.001" = 1 thou = .0254mm | | or 1mm = 39.37 mil or thou | | | | I hope the above is clear it was in my head before I started typing. | | | | On a different note there is a little used unit called a millihelen this is defined as the amount of beauty required to launch one ship........ | | | | | Boy! Am I glad you cleared that up: I was about to add similar remarks until I saw yours. I would like to add that 'mil' (metric or inchic) and 'thou' are both slang, or at least jargon, terms and should not be used in written language. Write "34 mils" as "0.034 inches" or, better still, according to the new decimal conventions, "0,034 inches". This is totally unambiguous. For those unaware of this convention, the Germanic and Gallic countries have used a comma as a decimal point since time immemorial and ISO now recommend it in preference to the full stop or the point placed half-way up the line because the full stop in many computer fonts is quasi-invisible (Arial included). So what about thousands dividers? In these countries, both the full stop and the apostrophe have been used, but ISO recommends a space (e.g., 1 234 567,89 rather than 1.234.567,89 or 1'234'567,89). For fractions, the leading zero before the decimal point is obligatory (e.g., 0,123 and not .123 or ,123, which would be ambiguous if your fax machine lost the punctuation sign or whatever). | | However, I'm havering off-topic. | | Brian | Truly, I am enlightened and, how shall I put it - in awe both at the majesty of your comments and your queen.

MoonMan

reply »

Brian

#9529

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 17 September, 1999

| | | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | each mil = .001" | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | At risk of informing someones grandmother on the art of removing the contents of an egg without breaking the shell. | | | | | | mil is an abbreviation of milli meaning 1/1000 | | | e.g 1 Millimetre is 1 meter/1000 | | | The term is also applied to imperial units of measure as given above. In the UK 0.001" is called a thou as opposed to a mil which often is used as an abbreviation for 1 millimetre | | | | | | If you are from the colonies then 1 mil = 0.001" = 1 thou = .0254mm | | | or 1mm = 39.37 mil or thou | | | | | | I hope the above is clear it was in my head before I started typing. | | | | | | On a different note there is a little used unit called a millihelen this is defined as the amount of beauty required to launch one ship........ | | | | | | | | Boy! Am I glad you cleared that up: I was about to add similar remarks until I saw yours. I would like to add that 'mil' (metric or inchic) and 'thou' are both slang, or at least jargon, terms and should not be used in written language. Write "34 mils" as "0.034 inches" or, better still, according to the new decimal conventions, "0,034 inches". This is totally unambiguous. For those unaware of this convention, the Germanic and Gallic countries have used a comma as a decimal point since time immemorial and ISO now recommend it in preference to the full stop or the point placed half-way up the line because the full stop in many computer fonts is quasi-invisible (Arial included). So what about thousands dividers? In these countries, both the full stop and the apostrophe have been used, but ISO recommends a space (e.g., 1 234 567,89 rather than 1.234.567,89 or 1'234'567,89). For fractions, the leading zero before the decimal point is obligatory (e.g., 0,123 and not .123 or ,123, which would be ambiguous if your fax machine lost the punctuation sign or whatever). | | | | However, I'm havering off-topic. | | | | Brian | | | Truly, I am enlightened and, how shall I put it - in awe both at the majesty of your comments and your queen. | | MoonMan |

MoonMan

Whose queen? I have not lived in a country with a queen since the day after your country last had a president assassinated (no connection between the two events, I assure you, nor with the fact that the Great Train Robbery took place a day or two beforehand).

Brian

reply »

Earl Moon

#9530

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 17 September, 1999

| | | | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | each mil = .001" | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | At risk of informing someones grandmother on the art of removing the contents of an egg without breaking the shell. | | | | | | | | mil is an abbreviation of milli meaning 1/1000 | | | | e.g 1 Millimetre is 1 meter/1000 | | | | The term is also applied to imperial units of measure as given above. In the UK 0.001" is called a thou as opposed to a mil which often is used as an abbreviation for 1 millimetre | | | | | | | | If you are from the colonies then 1 mil = 0.001" = 1 thou = .0254mm | | | | or 1mm = 39.37 mil or thou | | | | | | | | I hope the above is clear it was in my head before I started typing. | | | | | | | | On a different note there is a little used unit called a millihelen this is defined as the amount of beauty required to launch one ship........ | | | | | | | | | | | Boy! Am I glad you cleared that up: I was about to add similar remarks until I saw yours. I would like to add that 'mil' (metric or inchic) and 'thou' are both slang, or at least jargon, terms and should not be used in written language. Write "34 mils" as "0.034 inches" or, better still, according to the new decimal conventions, "0,034 inches". This is totally unambiguous. For those unaware of this convention, the Germanic and Gallic countries have used a comma as a decimal point since time immemorial and ISO now recommend it in preference to the full stop or the point placed half-way up the line because the full stop in many computer fonts is quasi-invisible (Arial included). So what about thousands dividers? In these countries, both the full stop and the apostrophe have been used, but ISO recommends a space (e.g., 1 234 567,89 rather than 1.234.567,89 or 1'234'567,89). For fractions, the leading zero before the decimal point is obligatory (e.g., 0,123 and not .123 or ,123, which would be ambiguous if your fax machine lost the punctuation sign or whatever). | | | | | | However, I'm havering off-topic. | | | | | | Brian | | | | | Truly, I am enlightened and, how shall I put it - in awe both at the majesty of your comments and your queen. | | | | MoonMan | | | | MoonMan | | Whose queen? I have not lived in a country with a queen since the day after your country last had a president assassinated (no connection between the two events, I assure you, nor with the fact that the Great Train Robbery took place a day or two beforehand). | | Brian | | Damn Brian,

Do forgive as, coupled with the fact I'm not too bright, I'm very ignorant.

Earl

reply »

#9531

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches | 17 September, 1999

| | | | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | each mil = .001" | | | | | | | | | | Earl Moon | | | | | | | | | At risk of informing someones grandmother on the art of removing the contents of an egg without breaking the shell. | | | | | | | | mil is an abbreviation of milli meaning 1/1000 | | | | e.g 1 Millimetre is 1 meter/1000 | | | | The term is also applied to imperial units of measure as given above. In the UK 0.001" is called a thou as opposed to a mil which often is used as an abbreviation for 1 millimetre | | | | | | | | If you are from the colonies then 1 mil = 0.001" = 1 thou = .0254mm | | | | or 1mm = 39.37 mil or thou | | | | | | | | I hope the above is clear it was in my head before I started typing. | | | | | | | | On a different note there is a little used unit called a millihelen this is defined as the amount of beauty required to launch one ship........ | | | | | | | | | | | Boy! Am I glad you cleared that up: I was about to add similar remarks until I saw yours. I would like to add that 'mil' (metric or inchic) and 'thou' are both slang, or at least jargon, terms and should not be used in written language. Write "34 mils" as "0.034 inches" or, better still, according to the new decimal conventions, "0,034 inches". This is totally unambiguous. For those unaware of this convention, the Germanic and Gallic countries have used a comma as a decimal point since time immemorial and ISO now recommend it in preference to the full stop or the point placed half-way up the line because the full stop in many computer fonts is quasi-invisible (Arial included). So what about thousands dividers? In these countries, both the full stop and the apostrophe have been used, but ISO recommends a space (e.g., 1 234 567,89 rather than 1.234.567,89 or 1'234'567,89). For fractions, the leading zero before the decimal point is obligatory (e.g., 0,123 and not .123 or ,123, which would be ambiguous if your fax machine lost the punctuation sign or whatever). | | | | | | However, I'm havering off-topic. | | | | | | Brian | | | | | Truly, I am enlightened and, how shall I put it - in awe both at the majesty of your comments and your queen. | | | | MoonMan | | | | MoonMan | | Whose queen? I have not lived in a country with a queen since the day after your country last had a president assassinated (no connection between the two events, I assure you, nor with the fact that the Great Train Robbery took place a day or two beforehand). | | Brian | | Brian: That was "queen" not "Queen." ;-)

reply »

JohnW

#9532

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches - why don't we all use the same thing ? | 17 September, 1999

| | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | Also, it has nothing to do with metric. | | | I was also confused with this standard of measuring before and it depends on which country you are in. Like me here in Australia, people speak of "mil in metric" and to some people here that term is for "millimeter" and when they speak of "thou" that term is for "mil in imperial system". | | But the correct conversion is : | | 1 mil= .001 inches or one thousandt of an inch | 1 inch = 1000 mil | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | AND it has nothing to do with metric... | | | Taking from my many experiences working in different countries...=) | | armin | | A thought trundled into my brain, a not all to frequent occurance these days, why don't we all use the same unit's. I mean UK / Europe are metricated, US is still in imperial, Australia is in I guess imperial, I mean what ever happened to SI unit's ? I'm working in Scotland so my head work's in metric, mm's and such so it's a headache to do the conversion's all the time, especially on a Friday Afternoon when my ice cold beer is calling. I guess my question ( yes there was one) was who decide's on the unit's ?

JohnW

reply »

Brian

#9533

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches - why don't we all use the same thing ? | 19 September, 1999

| | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | Also, it has nothing to do with metric. | | | | | | I was also confused with this standard of measuring before and it depends on which country you are in. Like me here in Australia, people speak of "mil in metric" and to some people here that term is for "millimeter" and when they speak of "thou" that term is for "mil in imperial system". | | | | But the correct conversion is : | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches or one thousandt of an inch | | 1 inch = 1000 mil | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | | AND it has nothing to do with metric... | | | | | | Taking from my many experiences working in different countries...=) | | | | armin | | | | A thought trundled into my brain, a not all to frequent occurance these days, why don't we all use the same unit's. | I mean UK / Europe are metricated, US is still in imperial, Australia is in I guess imperial, I mean what ever happened to SI unit's ? | I'm working in Scotland so my head work's in metric, mm's and such so it's a headache to do the conversion's all the time, especially on a Friday Afternoon when my ice cold beer is calling. | I guess my question ( yes there was one) was who decide's on the unit's ? | | JohnW | | Well, now, John, what do you think the International Standardisation Organisation (ISO)is for? Let's take the country with the greatest use of non-metric units, the USA, without any disrespect. Believe it or not, the USA Congress not only passed a bill legalising the use of metric units OVER 100 years ago, it had a rider strongly recommending its universal adoption and use in schools. And the USA is a signatory to all the ISO standards. As far as I know, the USA is the only major country that does not use the metric system. Another illustration is paper sizes: the USA signed the standard adopting the An, Bn etc. series of paper sizes. The last I heard, only two countries have not adopted it, the USA and yemen (sorry, I've just lost my capital y).

However, take courage. The first country to adopt the metric system was France, nearly 200 years ago. The livre (pound) became a current term for 500 grams but, if you ask for une livre de pain, you will get a 450 gram loaf, even today, because the bakers were recalcitrant to adopting the new units (and they gain an extra 10%).

Several years ago, I was exhibiting at InterNepcon in Birmingham UK and I needed a melamine hardboard panel. On enquiring the standard size, I was told it was 48 inches x 200 centimetres! Almost as bad as the American 10.5 mg/in2 eq. NaCl limit for ionic contamination on PCBs. On this little island, you can find land advertised in hectares, m2, donums or acres (worse, even though the metric system is official, the limit that aliens can purchase for inhabitation is fixed at 3 donums, whatever that may be).

And do your tools fit US machinery, cars etc?

If the USA had enacted their law seriously, then the problem would have been resolved donkey's (and elephant's, lest I be accused of partisanship) years ago.

Sorry if I sound harsh, but, let's admit it, it is a costly problem. Not only are conversions time-consuming, but prone to error and is 2 mils 2 mm or 0,0508 mm? The answer is both, depending where you are and even to whom you are speaking, which is damned ridiculous. My suggestion is to always write in metric and, if you feel it necessary, put the inchic in parentheses after, e.g. 22,3 mm (0,878 inch) or 65�C (149�F), noting that the degree symbol is dropped only for kelvins.

Brian

reply »

Brian

#9534

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches - why don't we all use the same thing ? | 19 September, 1999

| | | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches | | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | Also, it has nothing to do with metric. | | | | | | | | | I was also confused with this standard of measuring before and it depends on which country you are in. Like me here in Australia, people speak of "mil in metric" and to some people here that term is for "millimeter" and when they speak of "thou" that term is for "mil in imperial system". | | | | | | But the correct conversion is : | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches or one thousandt of an inch | | | 1 inch = 1000 mil | | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | | | | AND it has nothing to do with metric... | | | | | | | | | Taking from my many experiences working in different countries...=) | | | | | | armin | | | | | | A thought trundled into my brain, a not all to frequent occurance these days, why don't we all use the same unit's. | | I mean UK / Europe are metricated, US is still in imperial, Australia is in I guess imperial, I mean what ever happened to SI unit's ? | | I'm working in Scotland so my head work's in metric, mm's and such so it's a headache to do the conversion's all the time, especially on a Friday Afternoon when my ice cold beer is calling. | | I guess my question ( yes there was one) was who decide's on the unit's ? | | | | JohnW | | | | | Well, now, John, what do you think the International Standardisation Organisation (ISO)is for? Let's take the country with the greatest use of non-metric units, the USA, without any disrespect. Believe it or not, the USA Congress not only passed a bill legalising the use of metric units OVER 100 years ago, it had a rider strongly recommending its universal adoption and use in schools. And the USA is a signatory to all the ISO standards. As far as I know, the USA is the only major country that does not use the metric system. Another illustration is paper sizes: the USA signed the standard adopting the An, Bn etc. series of paper sizes. The last I heard, only two countries have not adopted it, the USA and yemen (sorry, I've just lost my capital y). | | However, take courage. The first country to adopt the metric system was France, nearly 200 years ago. The livre (pound) became a current term for 500 grams but, if you ask for une livre de pain, you will get a 450 gram loaf, even today, because the bakers were recalcitrant to adopting the new units (and they gain an extra 10%). | | Several years ago, I was exhibiting at InterNepcon in Birmingham UK and I needed a melamine hardboard panel. On enquiring the standard size, I was told it was 48 inches x 200 centimetres! Almost as bad as the American 10.5 mg/in2 eq. NaCl limit for ionic contamination on PCBs. On this little island, you can find land advertised in hectares, m2, donums or acres (worse, even though the metric system is official, the limit that aliens can purchase for inhabitation is fixed at 3 donums, whatever that may be). | | And do your tools fit US machinery, cars etc? | | If the USA had enacted their law seriously, then the problem would have been resolved donkey's (and elephant's, lest I be accused of partisanship) years ago. | | Sorry if I sound harsh, but, let's admit it, it is a costly problem. Not only are conversions time-consuming, but prone to error and is 2 mils 2 mm or 0,0508 mm? The answer is both, depending where you are and even to whom you are speaking, which is damned ridiculous. My suggestion is to always write in metric and, if you feel it necessary, put the inchic in parentheses after, e.g. 22,3 mm (0,878 inch) or 65�C (149�F), noting that the degree symbol is dropped only for kelvins. | | Brian | PS and there should always be a space between the number and the unit, except for �, to avoid any risk of confusion between a numeral and an alphabetical symbol. As an example, is 2,5lm 2,5 lumens or 2,51 metres? 2,5 lm is unequivocal.

reply »

Earl Moon

#9535

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches - why don't we all use the same thing ? | 19 September, 1999

| | | | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches | | | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | | Also, it has nothing to do with metric. | | | | | | | | | | | | I was also confused with this standard of measuring before and it depends on which country you are in. Like me here in Australia, people speak of "mil in metric" and to some people here that term is for "millimeter" and when they speak of "thou" that term is for "mil in imperial system". | | | | | | | | But the correct conversion is : | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches or one thousandt of an inch | | | | 1 inch = 1000 mil | | | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | | | | | | AND it has nothing to do with metric... | | | | | | | | | | | | Taking from my many experiences working in different countries...=) | | | | | | | | armin | | | | | | | | A thought trundled into my brain, a not all to frequent occurance these days, why don't we all use the same unit's. | | | I mean UK / Europe are metricated, US is still in imperial, Australia is in I guess imperial, I mean what ever happened to SI unit's ? | | | I'm working in Scotland so my head work's in metric, mm's and such so it's a headache to do the conversion's all the time, especially on a Friday Afternoon when my ice cold beer is calling. | | | I guess my question ( yes there was one) was who decide's on the unit's ? | | | | | | JohnW | | | | | | | | Well, now, John, what do you think the International Standardisation Organisation (ISO)is for? Let's take the country with the greatest use of non-metric units, the USA, without any disrespect. Believe it or not, the USA Congress not only passed a bill legalising the use of metric units OVER 100 years ago, it had a rider strongly recommending its universal adoption and use in schools. And the USA is a signatory to all the ISO standards. As far as I know, the USA is the only major country that does not use the metric system. Another illustration is paper sizes: the USA signed the standard adopting the An, Bn etc. series of paper sizes. The last I heard, only two countries have not adopted it, the USA and yemen (sorry, I've just lost my capital y). | | | | However, take courage. The first country to adopt the metric system was France, nearly 200 years ago. The livre (pound) became a current term for 500 grams but, if you ask for une livre de pain, you will get a 450 gram loaf, even today, because the bakers were recalcitrant to adopting the new units (and they gain an extra 10%). | | | | Several years ago, I was exhibiting at InterNepcon in Birmingham UK and I needed a melamine hardboard panel. On enquiring the standard size, I was told it was 48 inches x 200 centimetres! Almost as bad as the American 10.5 mg/in2 eq. NaCl limit for ionic contamination on PCBs. On this little island, you can find land advertised in hectares, m2, donums or acres (worse, even though the metric system is official, the limit that aliens can purchase for inhabitation is fixed at 3 donums, whatever that may be). | | | | And do your tools fit US machinery, cars etc? | | | | If the USA had enacted their law seriously, then the problem would have been resolved donkey's (and elephant's, lest I be accused of partisanship) years ago. | | | | Sorry if I sound harsh, but, let's admit it, it is a costly problem. Not only are conversions time-consuming, but prone to error and is 2 mils 2 mm or 0,0508 mm? The answer is both, depending where you are and even to whom you are speaking, which is damned ridiculous. My suggestion is to always write in metric and, if you feel it necessary, put the inchic in parentheses after, e.g. 22,3 mm (0,878 inch) or 65�C (149�F), noting that the degree symbol is dropped only for kelvins. | | | | Brian | | | PS and there should always be a space between the number and the unit, except for �, to avoid any risk of confusion between a numeral and an alphabetical symbol. As an example, is 2,5lm 2,5 lumens or 2,51 metres? 2,5 lm is unequivocal. | Well boys,

That dissertation really sizes it up. We're all screwed with a combination of bolt/nut/hole sizes. Nothing disgusting intended, but take my old Oldsmobile, please.

The Tornado has millions of miles on it (about 175K actually). Working on it is very interesting. First the engine in a 305 CI gutless wonder also dimensioned as something close to 5 liters but that would be more like its more powerful cousin the 350 CI engine.

Again, working on it provides other pleasures as both SAE bolts and those metric. Oh, there's one other size no wrench fits. Could it be Wentworth (don't remember how to spell that from my days with British "iron" as Matchless, BSA, Triumph, and Norton days)?

Damn fine ISO world, ain't it? I give credit to those inventing the standards while taking it mostly from MIL-Q-9848A (revision never rolled since introduction in 1963 and only nine pages long - but the reply took some effort). Shall we start a controversy or world crusade to make it all right?

MoonMan

reply »

Earl Moon

#9536

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches - why don't we all use the same thing ? | 19 September, 1999

| | | | | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches | | | | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | | | Also, it has nothing to do with metric. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | I was also confused with this standard of measuring before and it depends on which country you are in. Like me here in Australia, people speak of "mil in metric" and to some people here that term is for "millimeter" and when they speak of "thou" that term is for "mil in imperial system". | | | | | | | | | | But the correct conversion is : | | | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches or one thousandt of an inch | | | | | 1 inch = 1000 mil | | | | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | | | | | | | | AND it has nothing to do with metric... | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Taking from my many experiences working in different countries...=) | | | | | | | | | | armin | | | | | | | | | | A thought trundled into my brain, a not all to frequent occurance these days, why don't we all use the same unit's. | | | | I mean UK / Europe are metricated, US is still in imperial, Australia is in I guess imperial, I mean what ever happened to SI unit's ? | | | | I'm working in Scotland so my head work's in metric, mm's and such so it's a headache to do the conversion's all the time, especially on a Friday Afternoon when my ice cold beer is calling. | | | | I guess my question ( yes there was one) was who decide's on the unit's ? | | | | | | | | JohnW | | | | | | | | | | | Well, now, John, what do you think the International Standardisation Organisation (ISO)is for? Let's take the country with the greatest use of non-metric units, the USA, without any disrespect. Believe it or not, the USA Congress not only passed a bill legalising the use of metric units OVER 100 years ago, it had a rider strongly recommending its universal adoption and use in schools. And the USA is a signatory to all the ISO standards. As far as I know, the USA is the only major country that does not use the metric system. Another illustration is paper sizes: the USA signed the standard adopting the An, Bn etc. series of paper sizes. The last I heard, only two countries have not adopted it, the USA and yemen (sorry, I've just lost my capital y). | | | | | | However, take courage. The first country to adopt the metric system was France, nearly 200 years ago. The livre (pound) became a current term for 500 grams but, if you ask for une livre de pain, you will get a 450 gram loaf, even today, because the bakers were recalcitrant to adopting the new units (and they gain an extra 10%). | | | | | | Several years ago, I was exhibiting at InterNepcon in Birmingham UK and I needed a melamine hardboard panel. On enquiring the standard size, I was told it was 48 inches x 200 centimetres! Almost as bad as the American 10.5 mg/in2 eq. NaCl limit for ionic contamination on PCBs. On this little island, you can find land advertised in hectares, m2, donums or acres (worse, even though the metric system is official, the limit that aliens can purchase for inhabitation is fixed at 3 donums, whatever that may be). | | | | | | And do your tools fit US machinery, cars etc? | | | | | | If the USA had enacted their law seriously, then the problem would have been resolved donkey's (and elephant's, lest I be accused of partisanship) years ago. | | | | | | Sorry if I sound harsh, but, let's admit it, it is a costly problem. Not only are conversions time-consuming, but prone to error and is 2 mils 2 mm or 0,0508 mm? The answer is both, depending where you are and even to whom you are speaking, which is damned ridiculous. My suggestion is to always write in metric and, if you feel it necessary, put the inchic in parentheses after, e.g. 22,3 mm (0,878 inch) or 65�C (149�F), noting that the degree symbol is dropped only for kelvins. | | | | | | Brian | | | | | PS and there should always be a space between the number and the unit, except for �, to avoid any risk of confusion between a numeral and an alphabetical symbol. As an example, is 2,5lm 2,5 lumens or 2,51 metres? 2,5 lm is unequivocal. | | | Well boys, | | That dissertation really sizes it up. We're all screwed with a combination of bolt/nut/hole sizes. Nothing disgusting intended, but take my old Oldsmobile, please. | | The Tornado has millions of miles on it (about 175K actually). Working on it is very interesting. First the engine in a 305 CI gutless wonder also dimensioned as something close to 5 liters but that would be more like its more powerful cousin the 350 CI engine. | | Again, working on it provides other pleasures as both SAE bolts and those metric. Oh, there's one other size no wrench fits. Could it be Wentworth (don't remember how to spell that from my days with British "iron" as Matchless, BSA, Triumph, and Norton days)? | | Damn fine ISO world, ain't it? I give credit to those inventing the standards while taking it mostly from MIL-Q-9848A (revision never rolled since introduction in 1963 and only nine pages long - but the reply took some effort). Shall we start a controversy or world crusade to make it all right? | | MoonMan | SHOULD BE 9858 - too early even for me.

MoonMan

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Brian

#9537

Re: 1 mil = ?? inches - why don't we all use the same thing ? | 20 September, 1999

| | | | | | | | I am not familiar with the "mil" metric. How many inches is in 1 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ...or 10 mil? | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches | | | | | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | | | | Also, it has nothing to do with metric. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | I was also confused with this standard of measuring before and it depends on which country you are in. Like me here in Australia, people speak of "mil in metric" and to some people here that term is for "millimeter" and when they speak of "thou" that term is for "mil in imperial system". | | | | | | | | | | | | But the correct conversion is : | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 mil= .001 inches or one thousandt of an inch | | | | | | 1 inch = 1000 mil | | | | | | | 10 mil= .010 inches | | | | | | | | | | | | | AND it has nothing to do with metric... | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Taking from my many experiences working in different countries...=) | | | | | | | | | | | | armin | | | | | | | | | | | | A thought trundled into my brain, a not all to frequent occurance these days, why don't we all use the same unit's. | | | | | I mean UK / Europe are metricated, US is still in imperial, Australia is in I guess imperial, I mean what ever happened to SI unit's ? | | | | | I'm working in Scotland so my head work's in metric, mm's and such so it's a headache to do the conversion's all the time, especially on a Friday Afternoon when my ice cold beer is calling. | | | | | I guess my question ( yes there was one) was who decide's on the unit's ? | | | | | | | | | | JohnW | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Well, now, John, what do you think the International Standardisation Organisation (ISO)is for? Let's take the country with the greatest use of non-metric units, the USA, without any disrespect. Believe it or not, the USA Congress not only passed a bill legalising the use of metric units OVER 100 years ago, it had a rider strongly recommending its universal adoption and use in schools. And the USA is a signatory to all the ISO standards. As far as I know, the USA is the only major country that does not use the metric system. Another illustration is paper sizes: the USA signed the standard adopting the An, Bn etc. series of paper sizes. The last I heard, only two countries have not adopted it, the USA and yemen (sorry, I've just lost my capital y). | | | | | | | | However, take courage. The first country to adopt the metric system was France, nearly 200 years ago. The livre (pound) became a current term for 500 grams but, if you ask for une livre de pain, you will get a 450 gram loaf, even today, because the bakers were recalcitrant to adopting the new units (and they gain an extra 10%). | | | | | | | | Several years ago, I was exhibiting at InterNepcon in Birmingham UK and I needed a melamine hardboard panel. On enquiring the standard size, I was told it was 48 inches x 200 centimetres! Almost as bad as the American 10.5 mg/in2 eq. NaCl limit for ionic contamination on PCBs. On this little island, you can find land advertised in hectares, m2, donums or acres (worse, even though the metric system is official, the limit that aliens can purchase for inhabitation is fixed at 3 donums, whatever that may be). | | | | | | | | And do your tools fit US machinery, cars etc? | | | | | | | | If the USA had enacted their law seriously, then the problem would have been resolved donkey's (and elephant's, lest I be accused of partisanship) years ago. | | | | | | | | Sorry if I sound harsh, but, let's admit it, it is a costly problem. Not only are conversions time-consuming, but prone to error and is 2 mils 2 mm or 0,0508 mm? The answer is both, depending where you are and even to whom you are speaking, which is damned ridiculous. My suggestion is to always write in metric and, if you feel it necessary, put the inchic in parentheses after, e.g. 22,3 mm (0,878 inch) or 65�C (149�F), noting that the degree symbol is dropped only for kelvins. | | | | | | | | Brian | | | | | | | PS and there should always be a space between the number and the unit, except for �, to avoid any risk of confusion between a numeral and an alphabetical symbol. As an example, is 2,5lm 2,5 lumens or 2,51 metres? 2,5 lm is unequivocal. | | | | | Well boys, | | | | That dissertation really sizes it up. We're all screwed with a combination of bolt/nut/hole sizes. Nothing disgusting intended, but take my old Oldsmobile, please. | | | | The Tornado has millions of miles on it (about 175K actually). Working on it is very interesting. First the engine in a 305 CI gutless wonder also dimensioned as something close to 5 liters but that would be more like its more powerful cousin the 350 CI engine. | | | | Again, working on it provides other pleasures as both SAE bolts and those metric. Oh, there's one other size no wrench fits. Could it be Wentworth (don't remember how to spell that from my days with British "iron" as Matchless, BSA, Triumph, and Norton days)? | | | | Damn fine ISO world, ain't it? I give credit to those inventing the standards while taking it mostly from MIL-Q-9848A (revision never rolled since introduction in 1963 and only nine pages long - but the reply took some effort). Shall we start a controversy or world crusade to make it all right? | | | | MoonMan | | | SHOULD BE 9858 - too early even for me. | | MoonMan | Actually, it was Whitworth, but then there were also BSF (British Standard Fine) nuts and bolts, to screw things up (pun intended).

Last bike here was a 1951 Triumph Thunderbird Bonneville (650 cc, and with the rear suspension built into the hub, working on an arc, so that the chain always had the same tension: those were the days, my friend). My first one was a 250 cc BSA side-valve of 1932 vintage, with hand shift on the right of the tank: wish I still had it! My one regret of those times was not to have been able to lay my hands on a Brough Superior. The most dangerous bike I've ever ridden was a Rudge (I think 350 cc, but no longer sure) which had both brakes operating via Bowden cables from the same hand lever, with results you can imagine, depending which brake decided to work first: it was a lottery!.

Brian

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