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safety?

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I'm compiling a list of basic safety items that a manufactur... - Dec 03, 2012 by gaz  


gaz

#67716

safety? | 3 December, 2012

I'm compiling a list of basic safety items that a manufacturer should have in the shop.

e.g. goggles eye wash

What do you guys think should be on this list?

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#67717

Here's what you should have | 3 December, 2012

Spray area personal protective equipment * Paint spray respirator. * Leather topped shoes with slip resistant soles. * Safety eyeglasses Wave solder area personal protective equipment * Paint spray respirator * Leather topped shoes with slip resistant soles * Safety eyeglasses * Heat proof gloves * Heat proof apron Assembly area personal protective equipment *Safety eyeglasses are required to be worn in this area at all times. SMT assembly area personal protective equipment * Safety eyeglasses are required to be worn in this area at all times. * Protective gloves Hazardous materials spill remediation kit Blood bourne pathogen spill remediation kit Emergency lighting First aid kit Fire extinguishers Fire safe storage for flux Emergency flushing Proper training

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#67723

safety? | 4 December, 2012

Well done davef.

when you said "* Protective gloves" is this the use once disposable gloves say a dentist would use?

and what about anti-static precautions, sometimes your clothing might zip the electronic, but it still works, just that it might fail earlier that what it would of normally, at customers nuisance.

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#67726

safety? | 4 December, 2012

Here, the aim of using protective gloves in the SMT assembly area is to keep solder paste from operator hands for safety reasons. And sure, you make a good point, while you're trying to determine the correct material, it's a good idea that these gloves be selected from material that is ES dissipative, as you say.

Any time you use 'ESD protection' and 'customers' in the same sentence, you're walking a line between an approach that * Is cost effective * Makes customers' happy when spending your money

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#67727

safety? | 4 December, 2012

Hey Dave, to your knowledge are any of the listed items required by OSHA or any other standards?

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#67729

On OSHA ... | 4 December, 2012

Dan: OSHA is going to expect that you have a safety plan with lockout/tagout, blood bourne pathogen control, hazardous material spill remediation procedures, first aid preparedness, emergency flushing, etc.

While not required specifically in the code, the code is written broadly and open to interpretation. They're going to expect that you have taken prudent steps to protect your peeps that work in areas with potential hazards to their health. If they come in for some reason and you haven't done that, they'll write you up and require that it'll be fixed within a specified period of time.

Do it on your pace or theirs ... your pick.

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#67730

safety? | 5 December, 2012

I'd love for safety to be number one around here. I cringe a lot as I walk through our facility, I'm shocked by the things people do without the proper safety equipment. I always go and grab the equipment and bring it to the employee and explain, for example, "Those leads you are cutting could shoot into your eye and hurt you very bad, here take these glasses to protect you." But they always decline. I've even been laughed at for offering safety equipment. Our wave operators refuse to wear heat resistant gloves or aprons, they dont even wear safety glasses or a respirator while cleaning out the waves! So we offer the proper equipment and explain how its beneficial but still the employees refuse to use them.

What does everyone think?

1.)-Use wavers to show employees are aware of the dangers involved and willingly refuse to use the equipment?

or

2.)-Use discipline to enforce safety?

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#67731

safety? | 5 December, 2012

I have worked construction in both domestic and highrise in the last few years. Not wearing safety gear is an immediately sackable offense. It is not a bad way for it to be. Hard hats are always required on multi-story, steel capped boots are always worn, if working at night reflective and phlorescent vests etc. If I was the Boss paying the insurance that here in Australia basically mandates such stuff. I would simply have a meeting say what the new rules are, and those that wished to do otherwise should seek new employment. End of story. Of course there are areas where the wearing of gear can be a hazard in its self. Or makes it difficult to to the job, fit a hand into a machine etc. But all these things should be planned through and be justifiable to your insurer.

regards sarason.

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#67735

I aint granting no stinkin' waivers | 5 December, 2012

OSHA grants no waivers, neither should you. People need to be educated to the hazards of their work place. Bosses need to stand up, be adults and enforce prudent methods to keep their employees safe. Bosses will be blamed when something goes wrong, not the people. No one's guna buy "Oh, Bunny didn't like wearing safety glasses."

I'll tell you something else. If I was your customer and during a visit observed sloppy safety procedure enforcement, I'd wonder what other methods and procedures you were short-cutting.

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#67736

safety? | 5 December, 2012

I personally agree with that, but whenever I try to enforce safety the employees run to the owner and then I am made out to be a bully. I honestly believe I work in a different world than the rest of you. I am guessing in my case its best to just leave it be since I will not be held accountable, but still I'd hate to see any of these people seriously injured.

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#67740

No progress, unless the boss wants it | 5 December, 2012

You should try to change things, but until the owner supports you, you will continue to pee on your shoes, as you say.

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#67776

safety? | 6 December, 2012

Usually an accident that was perfectly for-seeable, due to a breaking of the rules, or an injury exacerbated by not wearing the appropriate safety gear can kick people along to be sensible. A little pep talk along about doing the right thing after a minor problem can focus peoples minds.

I have witnessed about 2 serious car accidents in the last 6 months. a lady dead at the wheel smashing into trees on the wrong side of the road a cyclist meeting a car as she was rounding a corner. The driver drunk as a skunk. Mind you her taking a corner on a saturday night is never a good idea in front of any car.

No accident is really an accident they are just to bad coincidences coming together to make something that would be minor or simply nothing at all worse.

Most accidents actually occur when people are tired. This paradoxically is about the worse time to teach them anything. because they don't have the psychological energy to take anything extra in.

Good luck in your campaign

sarason

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#67779

safety? | 7 December, 2012

I agree with you sarason, but just last week the owner of our company walked up to the wave solder while an operator was performing maintenance and the operator threw a bar of solder into the bath and solder splashed into the owners eye. Still no one thinks its a serious topic. So seeing the accident actually happen didn't change anyone's mind. The same operator that splashed the boss is cleaning the wave as I type with no gloves, glasses, apron, or respiratory protection.

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#67790

safety? | 7 December, 2012

A few years back I got a splinter of steel in my eye which destroyed my super good eyesight. Which now means it is difficult for me to work in electronics. The pain of steel was difficult to explain but, a year earlier I had a nail shot into my finger joint with a nail gun. and it swelled to twice its normal size. This was absolutely nothing compared to the eye injury. I had to endure the pain for about 4 days. As I only managed to get to the emergency department the next day ( a Saturday morning ). The eye specialist I got to on the following Monday. The specialist said my eyes would return to normal vision within about 3 months of the scraping that was done to remove the cuts that were made by the steel splinter. For months I had a double vision much like you would see in cartoons when I was a kid. For the first month it was a difficult task to drive as I had to drive with an eye patch and judging distance was difficult. It has taken about 2 years to have normal vision but when I compare both eyes, my right eye, still is nowhere as good.

Anyone that would risk this level of injury, has just got to be thick. Feel free to share this, with your co-workers.

regards sarason.

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#67791

safety? | 7 December, 2012

That's terrible I am so sorry that this happened to you. I will pass this story along as I have many others I like to share as well. Thank you for the real life account of a work related injury. Question, were you wearing safety equipment?

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#67797

safety? | 9 December, 2012

More than you would think. Hard hat, gloves, eye glasses, face shield when grinding, cutting, All relevent clothing. 35C in the shade. The mistake I made was cleaning the sweat out of my eye with the leather glove. Unfortunately, it was a friday afternoon, the sight was running down. No bloody eyewash bottle. The steel splinter was caught in the glove. So the lesson is never scratch , itch, sweat etc. Something you learn working construction.(mind over matter). Anyway when it actually happened. The splinter mustn't have dug in. I waited until I got home to clean out the splinter. As it turned out this was to late.

regards sarason

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#67806

safety? | 11 December, 2012

Juggalo,

Your boss obviously hasn't thought about the implications of taking a complacent attitude toward safety can cost. He is liable if someone gets hurt working in his plant who isn't wearing the proper safety equipment or none at all. It doesn't matter if they choose not to. Safety has to be an institutional philosophy and your owner needs to get behind it. Not only for his employees sake and safety, but for his protection as well. Safety policies need to be drafted, implemented, and enforced. The last thing your boss needs is to be sued because there is no safety policy. This he will understand, the bottom line. Speak his language and get him on board. OSHA offers no waivers. If they come through your plant and see someone soldering without safety glasses on, it doesn't matter if Bunny doesn't want to wear them. What will matter is the $10,000 fine per offense your owner will have to pay out in fines.

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#67807

safety? | 11 December, 2012

I just looked at your profile thinking perhaps you live outside the US. Different cultures can view safety in different ways. I was surprised to see you're in Chicago.

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#67810

safety? | 11 December, 2012

The owner of the company is from India, I don't know if that has anything to do with his thinking. He told me that he runs his business like a garden not a military. So I wear my safety gear and I am not too concerned with his fines as he appears to have tons of money anyway. If he isn't concerned I am not either. I have come to the realization in the last few days that there is too much corruption in this place to try to change. So I am looking elsewhere for a place where my ideas and ambitions are accepted and seen in a positive light. Not as trying to waste money or bully people.

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#67813

safety? | 11 December, 2012

Juggalo, How could anyone that affiliates themselves with the Insane Clown Posse not be taken seriously when making safety suggestions ?

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#67814

safety? | 11 December, 2012

Ha ha, very funny. I also have tattoos, I use curse words, and I am young. I shouldn't be trusted with anything, yeah right.

I hope that was actually meant to be a joke and I see the irony, but not every Juggalo is the same. Long story short and to avoid a flame war, being a Juggalo only means you can be whoever you want to be, and still belong to a group of people who accept you. So I am just me, and I am trying to make a career in the field of electronics manufacturing, so lets get back to that subject. :)

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#67818

safety? | 12 December, 2012

You won't want to hear this, but I guess that depends where your tattoos are located, and whether you swear like a sailor around the company. It's perception and people will perceive you a certain way depending on your appearance and how you handle yourself. Tattoos don't define you as a person, but everyone else will have there own definitions about you based on their perception. It may not be fair, but that's the way it is. My point is, part of the problem may be you. I believe that is what Sr Tech may have been alluding to.

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#67824

safety? | 12 December, 2012

I agree, 100%. My tattoos are on my arms and legs and are visible if I do not wear long sleeves or pants, so I understand people look at me in a different way. I also agree that I may be part of the problem with how I handle myself, but the only thing that seems to be problematic is the fact that I am impatient. Everyone wants to change this place at a snails pace, and even something as simple as making employees wear safety glasses has to be done at everyone else's pace, which can be frustrating. I've been told that I can not change the world over night, but nothing has changed. So based on my current situation, I'd say the real problem is this place. When I first started here two years ago, I had my work face on, 100% polite, yes sir, no sir, can I open this door for you? Can I help you lift this? Anything I could do to get on peoples good side, But then they took advantage of that. Management started to expect more and more without pay increases, and eventually I kind of relaxed. This also seems to be the case with many workers around here, they do not care about quality safety or punctuality. I sometimes feel like an aid in a retirement home more than a manufacturing engineer. I am really focused on learning now, because with everything I know it'll be easy to deflect comments like the one SR Tech made, and perceptions about me being a Juggalo and how that must negatively affect my work. But I do not curse directly at people and I assume people hear me use curse words when I'm thinking out loud, or speaking to my close friend/co-worker, neither of which I do in a yelling or even loud tone.

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#67835

safety? | 13 December, 2012

Until you get the owner behind you, you won't be able to do much. And until someone gets hurt, and they sue his pants off, he's not likely to change (We live in a society where personal culpability doesn't mean anything and no one is expected to use common sense). I believe this is a reflection of his feeling towards his employees. He doesn't care about their safety, based on what you have said. Perhaps you should look for other employment.

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#67836

safety? | 13 December, 2012

Thanks for the tips Resse! I am currently searching elsewhere. Wish me luck!

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