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SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


Production job times

Views: 5276


mij

#64292

Production job times | 10 May, 2011

Hi I am responsible for the whole of production and test and have been given the job by my manager to get accurate job times on all assemblies timing various staff. I have 18 years experience working in all areas of production and test so I know the best ways jobs are done, write the procedures based on my methods used. I train staff to achieve their numbers but find when left unchallenged they grossly under perform, using every excuse in the book not to do them. I want to be fair but feel the only way is to challenge them frequently. So what techniques do people use to ensure numbers are constantly achieved?

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#64293

Production job times | 10 May, 2011

I've found Electro-Shock Behavior Modification tools to be quite helpful.... You've got to crank the voltage up a little at first, but once you hit 'em two or three times you can turn it back down.

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mij

#64294

Production job times | 10 May, 2011

hmmm I don't think i'l get away with that one, the staff do not grasp the fact that if we do not maintain an acceptable efficiency their jobs are at risk to going to Asia or the company folding completely.

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#64295

Production job times | 10 May, 2011

If it truly is a case of lazy workers who could perform better (faster), tie their pay and/or bonuses to their performance. The faster workers get a larger bonus than the slower workers for instance. Many different ways to implement the details but pay based on performance is common.

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#64296

Production job times | 10 May, 2011

Frozen chocolate mint Girl Scout cookies ... that's the way to go

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#64309

Production job times | 12 May, 2011

This is just an example of what we do at our facility. We record cycle times of the "cells" the operators work in, they are divided into load time, robot time, tester, and packout. Generally I let the operator complete the process about five or more times, obviously I don't let the operator know I'm clocking them so they don't sand bag their times. Take the average time of the five, deduct about 15 percent effeciency (bathroom, touch up, gathering supplies, ect.). With the gathered info you should have your PPM. The operators keep track of what product they are running, how many hours they ran it, and record any "downtime" caused by equipment which in that case a member of engineering must inspect. At the end of everyshift there is a spread sheet created by the supervisors with the information operators , emailed to process engineering, and we figure out if they are producing the expected quota. If the operator is not meeting expectations we sit them down explain what's going on and if it continues to happen then disciplinary actions will follow. If they want to keep their job their performance will increase, if it continues to be unacceptable then pretty good chance that operator is seeking a new line of work.

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#64324

Production job times | 16 May, 2011

As strange it could sound, fired them!, well not all of them at the same time, but some folks and make them understand that they are fired because the lack of performance

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#64339

Production job times | 23 May, 2011

+1 Armando

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