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Batch cleaner

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#62567

Batch cleaner | 30 August, 2010

I'm looking into buying a closed loop batch cleaner. I was wondering what the cost of ownership would be. I'm assuming that the filters would be the biggest expense. I would probably be running about 200 boards per week. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks

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#62571

Batch cleaner | 30 August, 2010

So let's see, Cost of Ownership = [[Equipment cost + Setup]+[Operating costs]] / [Yield*Throughput*Utilization], where 'Operating costs' include: chemicals, water, electricity, DI tanks, filters, recycling costs, etc.

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#62579

Batch cleaner | 31 August, 2010

If the batch cleaner is truly closed loop, then 100% of all of the process fluid (water) is captured, filtered (particulate, carbon, resin) and reused. This answer is based on a traditional closed-loop batch cleaning system with an integrated water recycler running without a defluxing chemical.

In this configuration, all process water is recycled. Cost of any cleaning system is based on the following criteria:

Cost of machine Cost of electricity Assemblies per load (based on size and equipment’s cleaning performance) Cycle time Filter (carbon and resin) life Filter (carbon and resin) replacement cost

I do not know your assembly’s size but I will base an estimate on an average size of 4”x9”. I will also base the machine’s specifications on one that we build (others may be different). I will also make the assumption that the closed-loop recycler is integrated into the cleaning system. Finally, I will assume that no defluxing chemical will be used.

Assemblies per load: 52 Loads per hour (clean, cleanliness test, dry): 3 Assemblies cleaned per hour: 156 Number of production hours required to clean 200 assemblies: 1.3 hours Energy required to run machine for 1.3 hours: $1.30 (@ $0.12 per kW/hr) Total annual Energy (assuming no extra time running): $15.60 Estimated annual filter cost: $495.00 Total annual operational costs: $510.60 Cost per assembly: $0.22

Obviously, there are more costs including labor, depreciation, etc, and you will most likely not clean all assemblies at one time. In all likelihood, you will clean only a few at one time, causing you to operate the machine with smaller loads, all increasing the overall operational costs. The point of this exercise is to illustrate the individual process cost centers. I hope this helps!

Mike Konrad

Aqueous Technologies

konrad@aqueoustech.com

www.aqueoustech.com

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#62580

Batch cleaner | 1 September, 2010

Sheesh Mike. Can I get you to do my homework too? I've got a term paper coming up on Forcasting Advancements in Artificial Intelligence. Due in two weeks. Let me know when you've got a rough draft I can critique. ;)

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#62651

Batch cleaner | 7 September, 2010

Thanks for the info mike. How well do these batch cleaners work with densely populated through hole boards that were solder with no clean flux? Is there a problem with water getting trapped under large capacitors? I'm using kester 959t for flux on both lead and lead free assemblies.

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#62652

Batch cleaner | 7 September, 2010

As with so many things, some brands work very well on high density, low profile assemblies and some do not. Because my company manufactures these machines, I don't want to use this forum as an advertisement so I will recommend the following:

1. Send assemblies to various manufacturers and ask them to perform cleaning evaluations. Insist that they record (video) the entire process and provide a detailed timeline.

2. Inspect the assemblies ionically (ROSE test) and visually.

Request the cleaner's SPC data to review the specifics of each process step.

The good news is that both batch and inline defluxing systems are capable of effectively removing all process residues, even in high density applications. The decision drivers that should determine batch or inline should be based solely on volume and economics, not cleaning performance.

Mike Konrad

Aqueous Technologies

www.aqueoustech.com

konrad@aqueoustech.com

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