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SMT Disasters

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These images are of two melted matrix trays, full of BGA com... - Jul 07, 2008 by Josh  

#55389

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

These images are of two melted matrix trays, full of BGA components, which were left to bake in an oven over the weekend. The oven temperature controller was not checked after a recent power failure and reached a temperature of 715�F. The two trays melted together trapping one tray of components inside. The laminate portion of the BGA turned to ash, and the ceramic case became extremely brittle.

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#55392

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

Yeah, I burned my Pop-Tarts* this morning. Someone turned the knob on the cafeteria toaster oven. Gotta check them knobs no matter where ya go.

(* = Poster has no affiliation with Pop-Tarts or Pop-Tarts products)

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#55394

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

Well if something like that had to happen, at least it didn't happen with expensive parts.

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#55397

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

Pop-Tarts are kind of expense Dave. Maybe your 6 digit income can afford them daily......

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#55402

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

I have a wall of shame in my office. If someone does something stupid that damages equipment or parts I hang them on the wall to Embarrass them for their entire employment. sounds like you should hang these pictures on your oven to remind people what could happen, take a picture of the dummy that did this and hang it next to the picture of the parts! bet it wont happen again.

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#55404

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

What if you made a mistake and hung up the wrong picture?

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#55405

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

That's funny you say that, we also have a wall of shame where we hang the pictures. Sometimes it's amazing what people can do when they aren't paying attention. We don't post pictures of the operators though.

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#55410

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

We assume you're being facaecious.

If you think humiliating people drives your organization toward growth, development, and improvement; you're sadly mistaken. Your promotion of fear as motivation develops only one thing - anger towards you and the company that you represent. You demotivate not only the people whose picture you post, but all others because they wont take a chance on getting their nose rubbed in something that has the slightest chance of going sideways.

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#55411

SMT Disasters | 7 July, 2008

Me?? Six figures?? You're the one cooking those expensive Pop-Tarts, mame.

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#55412

SMT Disasters | 8 July, 2008

I totally agree with you, which is why we chose not to post a persons picture. Such fear could also affect productivity, as they are more cautious as not to make a mistake, which in turn could cause more problems.

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#55418

SMT Disasters | 8 July, 2008

What??? Those parts are fiiiiiine. You just need a slightly more aggressive flux. Sheesh. What's the big deal? I've gotten worse parts from a broker and had to make them work.

(Ow. I planted my tongue so firmly in my cheek that it hurts)

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#55423

SMT Disasters | 9 July, 2008

In our shop, a very large portion of the mistakes in the shop have their genesis with someone one other than the person making the mistake. Often, it is a chain of events that lead to the mistake.

How do your picture posting systems drill down to determine the root cause of the mistake?

We use a white board with columns: ISSUE/CONCERN ... ACTION ... FINDINGS

DATE: 01/18/01 ISSUE: White sudstance on floor. Pack ship area. ACTION: Police/Fire/Hazmat Team called & responded. Area isolated, substance covered / contained FINDINGS: Hazmat will have substance analyzed. Area cleaned & released for operation.

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#55431

SMT Disasters | 9 July, 2008

Ours are catagorized under "New Machine Justification" for getting the proper equipment for the job. I might catagorize this one under "Dry Cabinet"

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#55439

SMT Disasters | 9 July, 2008

There are temperature controllers that can be configured for a "safety stat" mode, so they blow a fuse to the main heater control if it goes, say, 10C or some reasonable fluctuation above the setpoint. It might be a VERY reasonable thing to add to your bake cabinet before you put it back on line. What you want is a TOTALLY independent control, with a separate sensor, power supply, etc. from the main control. If you don't like blowing fuses, you could put a big motor contactor in series with the main power to the oven, and have the safety stat drop out that contactor on overtemp.

Jon

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#55476

SMT Disasters | 11 July, 2008

We have an entire Industrial Eng crew that come in 2.5 hours after everyone starts work and leave 30 minutes after everyone leaves (that�s like having 65 extra working days off each year!). In that 30 minutes they take picture of what they think are defects and tape them on the Line Information Boards. No one can determine what it is they are trying to point out in their pictures, since they hide in their offices all day. Usually by the time they come in we are building something else or have other concerns besides their 8 X 11 glossy pictures (they must have a really nice printer some where). Plus the fact they usually post a new picture about 22.5 days on average, so the pictured product they post is usually 30-40 work orders in our past.

This may not be a SMT Disaster but sure is a work ethic disaster. Especially since we have no line rates, ergonomics, manufacturing production control, simulation analysis, optimization, or economic analysis. I guess I�m used to having Industrial engineering as a diverse discipline with many areas of specialization.

They do wear stop watches around their necks when they get coffee�� guess that�s something.

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#55480

SMT Disasters | 11 July, 2008

There is nothing wrong with working "remote hours". Why does everyone think we are slackers just because we work 4-5 hours a day at work. There is a ton of remote time spent thinking about work whilst driving too and from work, at home, working out - jogging during work hours, as well as AT work - which equates to double time. So you may think that those 65 days are spent goofing off when in actuality they are innovative time spent ideating.

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#55483

SMT Disasters | 11 July, 2008

Ms. Chunks,

I am an industrial engineering student at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee in Milwaukee, WI USA with many years of experience in the SMT assembly industry. By your description, an IE job with your company offers just the type of challenge I'm looking for (none). My only concern is that the IE's at your company must fetch their own coffee... Was that a typo? If you have any openings in the IE department I would certainly be interested in providing my resume. I am more than happy to relocate to a slightly less aggressive nation.

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