Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design SMT Electronics Assembly Manufacturing Forum

Printed Circuit Board Assembly & PCB Design Forum

SMT electronics assembly manufacturing forum.


Soldering fumes

Steve

#5631

Soldering fumes | 19 March, 2001

Does any body know if there are any legitimate health or safety reason's to vent solder fumes, at both reflow and hand soldering work stations? Personally I don't like to have the fumes in my face, but I don't know if it causes a health risk.

Thanks for your responses.

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#5639

Soldering fumes | 19 March, 2001

Liken soldering fumes to cigarette smoke. These fumes consist of two elements.

1 Smoke particles [very sticky] 2 Gases and vapors

Particulate Filters: Smoke particles can be removed with a particulate filter. All particulate filters are graded under a Eurovent Standard (EU), which relates filtration efficiency to particle size. The higher the EU number, the greater the efficiency of the filter.

Chemical/Gas Filters: Gases and vapors must be absorbed by chemical filters, which are usually carbon based. Airidus chemical filters will absorb the most common chemicals and solvents found within the electronics industry. To understand the filtration efficiency needs of your chemicals and solvents, please provide an MSDS safety sheet to your local Airidus representative for review.

Hazards of solder fumes: http://www.airidus.com/prodlit/fumes.html

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Mike Beach

#5642

Soldering fumes | 19 March, 2001

Steve, I don't like the fumes in my face either! Can you forward me any decent replies? It would be greatly appreciated.

Presently at work we have a fan with a carbon filter attatched. This works fairly well if properly positioned, and it is incredible how often this filter needs to be cleaned!

Thanks if you can send me anything! Mike mikebeach1@hotmail.com

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Mike Beach

#5643

Soldering fumes | 19 March, 2001

Steve, I don't like the fumes in my face either! Can you forward me any decent replies? It would be greatly appreciated.

Presently at work we have a fan with a carbon filter attatched. This works fairly well if properly positioned, and it is incredible how often this filter needs to be cleaned!

Thanks if you can send me anything! Mike mikebeach1@hotmail.com

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#5644

Soldering fumes | 19 March, 2001

Your carbon filters are getting gummed-up by the smoke component of the fumes. [Your carbon filter is intended to remove the vapor portion of the fumes.] You need a cheap bag filter in front of the carbon filter that you can sacrifice. These fumes will gum-up HEPA filters the same way.

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CAL

#5661

Soldering fumes | 20 March, 2001

I only inhale flux with a high IPA content.(joke for those who don't know me)

I have seen the inside of duct work for our wave soldering machine............NASTY!

DAVE F. is right! Flux contains a lot of bad stuff- Chlorides, Bromides, Flourides, acids and salts to name a few.Just not good stuff to take into ones body.

IPC J-STD-001 13.1 Health and Safety: adequate ventilation MUST (required) be provided in all areas where solder chemicals are used or fumes are generated.

I hope this helps.

Cal

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CAL

#5662

Soldering fumes | 20 March, 2001

I only inhale flux with a high IPA content.(joke for those who don't know me)

I have seen the inside of duct work for our wave soldering machine............NASTY!

DAVE F. is right! Flux contains a lot of bad stuff- Chlorides, Bromides, Fluorides, acids and salts to name a few.Just not good stuff to take into ones body.

IPC J-STD-001 13.1 Health and Safety: adequate ventilation MUST (required) be provided in all areas where solder chemicals are used or fumes are generated.

We currently use Metcal and Impell to exhaust fumes.

I hope this helps.

Cal

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