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THT manual assembly worker instructions

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Manual THT assembly (10 to 300 boards, 20 to 300 THT compone... - Feb 23, 2008 by schorschimi  

#53783

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 23 February, 2008

Manual THT assembly (10 to 300 boards, 20 to 300 THT components each)requires instructions for the semiskilled workers. These instructions should also be used for viual manual inspection and the final AQL.

Which type of instruction is recommended? Literature with research results would be highly appreciated.

Schoschimi

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#53785

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 24 February, 2008

Some of our troop have poorly developed reading skills, because either English is a second language or other reasons. So, we use visual tools.

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#53787

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 24 February, 2008

Hi davef,

your comment is interesting.

Can you give details of your "visual tools"

schorschimi

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#53788

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 24 February, 2008

Skill and experiance level of assemblers is critical. High skill and experiance with the type of assembly, print and BOM and hgihlighters.

Day labor would be 5 to 10 components for each assembler, already prepped with pictures or drawings showing where the parts go. Assume the assemblers can read some language. The descriptions are gibberish in English as they are abbreveations, parts locations and parts numbers. So everything is a symbol that has to be learned. I had the same problems with non-English speakers as natives.

Something in between would be a a machine from Contact Systems or equilivent that presents only the part to be assembled and a light where it goes. Some cut and clinch the part.

This all depends on how expensive is the labor and how costly is the error?

Some one has to review the document package for hidden requirements and non standard practice. This operation sounds like a CM doing obsolete PCA's. Although IPC 610 is a current workmanships standard, there were many designs from the 70's, 80's ans 90's that pre date the standard or were built to a different standard completely. The problem is some of the designs will not work if built to todays specification.

It's up the the factory team to figure out the enviorment they are in and what will work.

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PR

#53789

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 25 February, 2008

We also used color coding of bins, along with a picture of where to put the part on the PCB. Also split up parts that look similar (to seperate work stations) when possible.

good luck

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#53792

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 25 February, 2008

Search the fine SMTnet Archives on line balancing to find threads like http://www.smtnet.com/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=53089

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#53793

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 25 February, 2008

There are various software programs out there to aid in the creation of visual aids for manual assy. and other steps in the process. We currently use Circuitcam (Aegis). It helps us create color coded (by part number) visual aids for the whole process.

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#53795

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 25 February, 2008

Poor reading skills......that being said, with good resolution (3 megapixel and up) digital cameras so readily available, and cheap, why not use real pictures? After all, a picture's worth a thousand words...

In the '90s, I used to translate CAD/Gerber to work instruction format...color coded (one color for stuff, one for inspect) and all that good stuff. Some people still didn't understand the instruction.

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#53801

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 25 February, 2008

the information on "slide lines" in this forum sounds fine, but if you have to stuff 10 boards with 100 or more components a slide line is not very practical. We therefore have 1 worker do the whole board. I assume that others face the same task. What kind of worker instruction is recommended for these tasks?

Schorschmi

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#53803

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 25 February, 2008

In that case the same tools can apply, just different implementation.

We might use any a number of visual aids for an assembly, one for each component type (resisors, capacitors, ICs, etc.). In the case you're describing we might color code the locations on the drawing according to part value or description and throw a tag into the parts bin of the same color. We would get nowhere fast using written instructions, particularly those written in English.

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#53804

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 25 February, 2008

Our people have EXCELLENT reading skills, and for some stuff I do have a list of the order to assemble the parts, with some tricks, etc. called out. But, a color-coded assembly drawing is what we use the most. I use Sharpie markers to color-code the most commonly used components. They are available in about 8 colors. I write a legend on the border with a red square marked 1.0K, a green square marked 0.1 uF, etc.

This is the fastest way to indicate the parts.

Jon

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#53811

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 26 February, 2008

Does anyone still do Laser-Guided manual insertion?

Any manufacturers out there for that?

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#53812

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 26 February, 2008

here are two companies from Germany doing these machines.

Heeb D 74372 Sinsheim and Fritsch D 92280 Kastl

Many companies use Royonik

What kind of instructions are you using for the boards I described?

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#53813

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 26 February, 2008

You mean like Contact Systems? Other than that I'm sure there are some old Royonics machines still floating around.

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#53814

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 26 February, 2008

KRIKIES! "excellent" reading skills, me lad?

Is your workforce required to read "Catcher in the Rye" and Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales"? lol

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#53815

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 26 February, 2008

The german machines use the same basic procedure as the Compact Systems CS-400E but (to my knowledge) no cut and clinch. Can you give any information about manual visual inspection after stuffing boards with such machine. If stuffing boards without such machine what kind of assembly instructions do you provide for your workers?

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#53816

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 26 February, 2008

I haven't had the luxury of machine based pth assembly in quite a while, but when I did, given that the machines control which parts are inserted (and to a lesser degree where they are inserted) we decided not to perform inspection on that part of the process other than downsteam assembler checks.

There was post wave inspection to check soldering quality but that process was audited heavily and didn't really require much inspection either. The rare missed parts and wrong polarities washed out in test.

This was medical device manufacturing and the entire machine area (auto-insert as well) process was subjected to process validation so we really did have the bases covered pretty closely. Every move (program load, bin refills, configuration checks, etc.) was subjected to two party signoffs.

AFA instructions, I talked about it above. Mostly felt pen color coded drawings here. At my previous employer (where we had the Universal and Royonics PTH stuff) we had colorized drawings, procedures, assembly aids, *special* instructions, the works.

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#53828

THT manual assembly worker instructions | 28 February, 2008

You can pick up a used Contact CS-400(x) machine pretty cheap these days. Let me know if youre interested and I can prob find one for you.

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