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Water Soluble vs. No Clean

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#41310

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 2 May, 2006

Currently I am using a water soluble solder paste and no clean wire solder. For awhile now I have been pushing to switch to no clean across the board. Can anyone give me an idea of how this will effect production?

Switching to no clean will allow me to get rid of my troublesome aqueous cleaner, shorten production time, and allow me not have to use such an aggressive flux. What is the other side of coin?

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PWH

#41313

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 2 May, 2006

Just a few problems you might have to deal with:

1) Your bare boards must be clean and kept clean though-out the process. You could notice handling contamination that might otherwise have been removed in your wash.

2) You will see solder balls and beads that you never noticed were there with water soluable.

3) Tighter control of print process is needed to cut back on solder balls and beads.

4) Placements of parts must be very good as off-center placemtents can contribute to solder beads.

5) Re-work on the SMT line can be a bit more time consuming as post re-work clean-up is more difficult.

6) Re-cutting of stencils might be required on some builds as smaller apertures or home-plate apertures might be needed to cut back on SMT solder issues.

7) You will need to buy additive for your stencil cleaner.

Sounds like a lot but overall, pretty simple stuff to deal with and most of these result in positive quality changes.

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#41315

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 2 May, 2006

Thank you PWH,

All good points. I use a semi-automatic printing process not a screen printer so if more solder balls and beads are created then I would be creating more re-work and that is exactly what I do not want to do.

I guess the best thing to do would be to sample some no clean paste and test run a few boards to see how many of these problems actually occur.

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Mike Konrad

#41325

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 2 May, 2006

We manufacturer cleaning equipment (full disclosure) so, our answer may seem self-serving. The facts however are accurate and relevant so here I go�

Changing from an OA (water soluble) flux to a no-clean flux makes sense. After all, even die-hard cleaning proponents like me can concede the fact that not all assemblies have to be cleaned. Please note the fact that I did not say �not all assemblies would benefit from cleaning�. To be clear, all assemblies benefit from cleaning although the benefits of cleaning may not be fully appreciated on all boards. Matters of use that affect liability, dependability etc all play a role in the decision to clean or not to clean. Obviously, boards and applications benefit from cleaning. Most medical, military, flight, space, and other high reliability applications normally require cleaning for a reason.

Can YOU give up cleaning? Maybe, but you need to consider the other costs of not cleaning.

There are a number of articles available that demonstrate the cost of not cleaning. I am pleased to provide links to such articles:

From Austin American Technology: http://www.aat-corp.com/whynocleans.pdf

From Aqueous Technologies http://smt.pennnet.com/articles/article_display.cfm?Section=ARCHI&C=Colum&ARTICLE_ID=245681&KEYWORDS=konrad&p=35

From Zestron http://smt.pennnet.com/Articles/Article_Display.cfm?Section=ARTCL&ARTICLE_ID=249818&VERSION_NUM=2&p=35

From Forsite http://www.residues.com/pdfs/Circuitnet/Process_Residues_Cause_Field_Performance_Problems.pdf

http://www.residues.com/pdf/FailureOfACircuit.pdf

I hope this helps.

Mike Konrad Aqueous Technologies (909) 944-7771 ext 29 www.aqueoustech.com konrad@aqueoustech.com

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Chunks

#41343

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 3 May, 2006

All good points by Pee Wee Herman; your solder balling may appear if you don't currently have stencil with reduced apertures or "homeplate" design.

"Flux is solders' muscle."

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#41345

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 3 May, 2006

Chunks,

You should have been in marketing But as a flux manufacturer I have to make a small correction Solder is the muscle flux the nerve

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#41346

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 3 May, 2006

And for all you dopes who come on this board and shamlessly promote your products through strong-armed negative sales tactics....may I present Mr. Konrad.

This is how it's done.

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Chunks

#41348

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 3 May, 2006

Does that make the board the bone? If so then the components are tendons? I knew I should've stayed awake in Bio!

Flux manufacturer eh... Is it true that flux is made in big vats by witches?

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Cmiller

#41352

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 3 May, 2006

Amen.

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Silver Sparrow

#41354

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 3 May, 2006

We run both No-Clean and Water Soluble boards without any problems. We had problems with solderballs, but adjusted the P&P machines not to push the parts into the paste so much. Home plate apperatures help also. The biggest question is if your customer will be happy with flux on your boards.

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#41355

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 3 May, 2006

Chunks, you don't wanna know where I would put aqueous cleaners in the bio equation. (just kidding Mike) And your absolutely right flux is made by good looking witches in bathing suites That�s why I'm in that business

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Chunks

#41368

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 4 May, 2006

I knew it. That's why you can never show us parts of your facility. Plus the fact that all lost socks from the dryer end up in your facility too. We all know that's how no-clean was invented.

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RDR

#41369

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 4 May, 2006

Yep, this would be why I have aqueoustech products in my factory and not "theirs"!

Russ

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RDR

#41370

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 4 May, 2006

And of course it is a great product that performs well!

there's a sales pitch for you from a USER!

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Pee Wee

#41375

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 4 May, 2006

Dang it Chunks! Didn't even think of the intitials correlation - nice one. Maybe I'll stick with Pee Wee from here on out...

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Chunks

#41376

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 4 May, 2006

Sorry, I love that movie! And do a pretty good impression too!

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#41399

Water Soluble vs. No Clean | 6 May, 2006

We too use both Water soluble and No-clean in our shop. I can tell you that we have won 6 different contracts from other local contract house because our boards "look pretty". It's amazing how some customers judge how other houses build their boards. We are just about to convert our whole shop over to the water soluable process. The no clean is just too much of a mess to work with. If you operators have any touch-up on a no-clean board they will most likly have to add additional flux. This additional flux looks like crap! If you have the operators clean this extra flux from the PCB then you have to chemicals to clean it, this adds time and expense. We did a study and it was costing us more to use the no-clean process. We have customers that think they want no-clean by freak when they see flux. Go figure!

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